Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/91159
Title:
Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings.
Authors:
Mills, Edward J; Ford, Nathan; Singh, Sonal; Eyawo, Oghenowede
Journal:
Current HIV/AIDS reports
Abstract:
There has been an historic expectation that delivering combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to populations affected by violent conflict is untenable due to population movement and separation of drug supplies. There is now emerging evidence that cART provision can be successful in these populations. Using examples from Médecins Sans Frontières experience in a variety of African settings and also local nongovernmental organizations' experiences in northern Uganda, we examine novel approaches that have ensured retention in programs and adequate adherence. Emerging guidelines from United Nations bodies now support the expansion of cART in settings of conflict.
Affiliation:
BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, BC, Canada. emills@cfenet.ubc.ca
Issue Date:
Nov-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/91159
PubMed ID:
19849963
Language:
en
ISSN:
1548-3576
Appears in Collections:
HIV/AIDS

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorMills, Edward Jen
dc.contributor.authorFord, Nathanen
dc.contributor.authorSingh, Sonalen
dc.contributor.authorEyawo, Oghenowedeen
dc.date.accessioned2010-02-04T21:22:25Z-
dc.date.available2010-02-04T21:22:25Z-
dc.date.issued2009-11-
dc.identifier.citationProviding antiretroviral care in conflict settings. 2009, 6 (4):201-9 Curr HIV/AIDS Repen
dc.identifier.issn1548-3576-
dc.identifier.pmid19849963-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/91159-
dc.description.abstractThere has been an historic expectation that delivering combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to populations affected by violent conflict is untenable due to population movement and separation of drug supplies. There is now emerging evidence that cART provision can be successful in these populations. Using examples from Médecins Sans Frontières experience in a variety of African settings and also local nongovernmental organizations' experiences in northern Uganda, we examine novel approaches that have ensured retention in programs and adequate adherence. Emerging guidelines from United Nations bodies now support the expansion of cART in settings of conflict.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Current HIV/AIDS reportsen
dc.subject.meshAcquired Immunodeficiency Syndromeen
dc.subject.meshAfrica South of the Saharaen
dc.subject.meshAnti-Retroviral Agentsen
dc.subject.meshGuidelines as Topicen
dc.subject.meshHealth Knowledge, Attitudes, Practiceen
dc.subject.meshHealth Services Accessibilityen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshMedication Adherenceen
dc.subject.meshRapeen
dc.subject.meshSexual Behavioren
dc.subject.meshUnited Nationsen
dc.subject.meshVoluntary Health Agenciesen
dc.subject.meshWaren
dc.titleProviding antiretroviral care in conflict settings.en
dc.contributor.departmentBC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, BC, Canada. emills@cfenet.ubc.caen
dc.identifier.journalCurrent HIV/AIDS reportsen

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