Prevalence and risk factors of Lassa seropositivity in inhabitants of the forest region of Guinea: a cross-sectional study.

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/98756
Title:
Prevalence and risk factors of Lassa seropositivity in inhabitants of the forest region of Guinea: a cross-sectional study.
Authors:
Kernéis, Solen; Koivogui, Lamine; Magassouba, N'Faly; Koulemou, Kekoura; Lewis, Rosamund; Aplogan, Aristide; Grais, Rebecca F; Guerin, Philippe J; Fichet-Calvet, Elisabeth
Journal:
PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseases
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. The reservoir host of the virus is a multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis. Prevalence estimates of Lassa virus antibodies in humans vary greatly between studies, and the main modes of transmission of the virus from rodents to humans remain unclear. We aimed to (i) estimate the prevalence of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibodies (LV IgG) in the human population of a rural area of Guinea, and (ii) identify risk factors for positive LV IgG. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population-based cross-sectional study design was used. In April 2000, all individuals one year of age and older living in three prefectures located in the tropical secondary forest area of Guinea (Gueckedou, Lola and Yomou) were sampled using two-stage cluster sampling. For each individual identified by the sampling procedure and who agreed to participate, a standardized questionnaire was completed to collect data on personal exposure to potential risk factors for Lassa fever (mainly contact with rodents), and a blood sample was tested for LV IgG. A multiple logistic regression model was used to determine risk factors for positive LV IgG. A total of 1424 subjects were interviewed and 977 sera were tested. Prevalence of positive LV Ig was of 12.9% [10.8%-15.0%] and 10.0% [8.1%-11.9%] in rural and urban areas, respectively. Two risk factors of positive LV IgG were identified: to have, in the past twelve months, undergone an injection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8 [1.1-3.1]), or lived with someone displaying a haemorrhage (OR = 1.7 [1.1-2.9]). No factors related to contacts with rats and/or mice remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study underlines the potential importance of person-to-person transmission of Lassa fever, via close contact in the same household or nosocomial exposure.
Affiliation:
Epicentre, Paris, France. solen.kerneis@cch.aphp.com
Issue Date:
Nov-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/98756
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pntd.0000548
PubMed ID:
19924222
Language:
en
ISSN:
1935-2735
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKernéis, Solenen
dc.contributor.authorKoivogui, Lamineen
dc.contributor.authorMagassouba, N'Falyen
dc.contributor.authorKoulemou, Kekouraen
dc.contributor.authorLewis, Rosamunden
dc.contributor.authorAplogan, Aristideen
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Rebecca Fen
dc.contributor.authorGuerin, Philippe Jen
dc.contributor.authorFichet-Calvet, Elisabethen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-13T22:28:10Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-13T22:28:10Z-
dc.date.issued2009-11-
dc.identifier.citationPrevalence and risk factors of Lassa seropositivity in inhabitants of the forest region of Guinea: a cross-sectional study. 2009, 3 (11):e548 PLoS Negl Trop Disen
dc.identifier.issn1935-2735-
dc.identifier.pmid19924222-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pntd.0000548-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/98756-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Lassa fever is a viral hemorrhagic fever endemic in West Africa. The reservoir host of the virus is a multimammate rat, Mastomys natalensis. Prevalence estimates of Lassa virus antibodies in humans vary greatly between studies, and the main modes of transmission of the virus from rodents to humans remain unclear. We aimed to (i) estimate the prevalence of Lassa virus-specific IgG antibodies (LV IgG) in the human population of a rural area of Guinea, and (ii) identify risk factors for positive LV IgG. METHODS AND FINDINGS: A population-based cross-sectional study design was used. In April 2000, all individuals one year of age and older living in three prefectures located in the tropical secondary forest area of Guinea (Gueckedou, Lola and Yomou) were sampled using two-stage cluster sampling. For each individual identified by the sampling procedure and who agreed to participate, a standardized questionnaire was completed to collect data on personal exposure to potential risk factors for Lassa fever (mainly contact with rodents), and a blood sample was tested for LV IgG. A multiple logistic regression model was used to determine risk factors for positive LV IgG. A total of 1424 subjects were interviewed and 977 sera were tested. Prevalence of positive LV Ig was of 12.9% [10.8%-15.0%] and 10.0% [8.1%-11.9%] in rural and urban areas, respectively. Two risk factors of positive LV IgG were identified: to have, in the past twelve months, undergone an injection (odds ratio [OR] = 1.8 [1.1-3.1]), or lived with someone displaying a haemorrhage (OR = 1.7 [1.1-2.9]). No factors related to contacts with rats and/or mice remained statistically significant in the multivariate analysis. CONCLUSIONS: Our study underlines the potential importance of person-to-person transmission of Lassa fever, via close contact in the same household or nosocomial exposure.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to PLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAged, 80 and overen
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshAntibodies, Viralen
dc.subject.meshCell Lineen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshCross-Sectional Studiesen
dc.subject.meshDisease Reservoirsen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshGuineaen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshImmunoglobulin Gen
dc.subject.meshLassa Feveren
dc.subject.meshLassa virusen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiceen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshPedigreeen
dc.subject.meshPrevalenceen
dc.subject.meshRatsen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.subject.meshRodentiaen
dc.subject.meshRural Populationen
dc.subject.meshUrban Healthen
dc.subject.meshYoung Adulten
dc.titlePrevalence and risk factors of Lassa seropositivity in inhabitants of the forest region of Guinea: a cross-sectional study.en
dc.contributor.departmentEpicentre, Paris, France. solen.kerneis@cch.aphp.comen
dc.identifier.journalPLoS Neglected Tropical Diseasesen

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