A look back at an ongoing problem: Shigella dysenteriae type 1 epidemics in refugee settings in Central Africa (1993-1995).

Hdl Handle:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/98774
Title:
A look back at an ongoing problem: Shigella dysenteriae type 1 epidemics in refugee settings in Central Africa (1993-1995).
Authors:
Kernéis, Solen; Guerin, Philippe J; von Seidlein, Lorenz; Legros, Dominique; Grais, Rebecca F
Journal:
PloS one
Abstract:
BACKGROUND: Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1) is a cause of major dysentery outbreaks, particularly among children and displaced populations in tropical countries. Although outbreaks continue, the characteristics of such outbreaks have rarely been documented. Here, we describe the Sd1 outbreaks occurring between 1993 and 1995 in 11 refugee settlements in Rwanda, Tanzania and Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). We also explored the links between the different types of the camps and the magnitude of the outbreaks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Number of cases of bloody diarrhea and deaths were collected on a weekly basis in 11 refugee camps, and analyzed retrospectively. Between November 1993 and February 1995, 181,921 cases of bloody diarrhea were reported. Attack rates ranged from 6.3% to 39.1% and case fatality ratios (CFRs) from 1.5% to 9.0% (available for 5 camps). The CFRs were higher in children under age 5. In Tanzania where the response was rapidly deployed, the mean attack rate was lower than in camps in the region of Goma without an immediate response (13.3% versus 32.1% respectively). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This description, and the areas where data is missing, highlight both the importance of collecting data in future epidemics, difficulties in documenting outbreaks occurring in complex emergencies and most importantly, the need to assure that minimal requirements are met.
Affiliation:
Epicentre, Paris, France.
Issue Date:
Feb-2009
URI:
http://hdl.handle.net/10144/98774
DOI:
10.1371/journal.pone.0004494
PubMed ID:
19214226
Language:
en
ISSN:
1932-6203
Appears in Collections:
Other Diseases

Full metadata record

DC FieldValue Language
dc.contributor.authorKernéis, Solenen
dc.contributor.authorGuerin, Philippe Jen
dc.contributor.authorvon Seidlein, Lorenzen
dc.contributor.authorLegros, Dominiqueen
dc.contributor.authorGrais, Rebecca Fen
dc.date.accessioned2010-05-13T22:21:51Z-
dc.date.available2010-05-13T22:21:51Z-
dc.date.issued2009-02-
dc.identifier.citationA look back at an ongoing problem: Shigella dysenteriae type 1 epidemics in refugee settings in Central Africa (1993-1995). 2009, 4 (2):e4494 PLoS ONEen
dc.identifier.issn1932-6203-
dc.identifier.pmid19214226-
dc.identifier.doi10.1371/journal.pone.0004494-
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/98774-
dc.description.abstractBACKGROUND: Shigella dysenteriae type 1 (Sd1) is a cause of major dysentery outbreaks, particularly among children and displaced populations in tropical countries. Although outbreaks continue, the characteristics of such outbreaks have rarely been documented. Here, we describe the Sd1 outbreaks occurring between 1993 and 1995 in 11 refugee settlements in Rwanda, Tanzania and Democratic Republic of the Congo (DRC). We also explored the links between the different types of the camps and the magnitude of the outbreaks. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Number of cases of bloody diarrhea and deaths were collected on a weekly basis in 11 refugee camps, and analyzed retrospectively. Between November 1993 and February 1995, 181,921 cases of bloody diarrhea were reported. Attack rates ranged from 6.3% to 39.1% and case fatality ratios (CFRs) from 1.5% to 9.0% (available for 5 camps). The CFRs were higher in children under age 5. In Tanzania where the response was rapidly deployed, the mean attack rate was lower than in camps in the region of Goma without an immediate response (13.3% versus 32.1% respectively). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: This description, and the areas where data is missing, highlight both the importance of collecting data in future epidemics, difficulties in documenting outbreaks occurring in complex emergencies and most importantly, the need to assure that minimal requirements are met.en
dc.language.isoenen
dc.rightsPublished by Public Library of Science, [url]http://www.plosone.org/[/url] Archived on this site by Open Access permissionen
dc.subject.meshAfrica, Centralen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshDiarrheaen
dc.subject.meshDisease Outbreaksen
dc.subject.meshDysenteryen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshRefugeesen
dc.subject.meshShigella dysenteriaeen
dc.titleA look back at an ongoing problem: Shigella dysenteriae type 1 epidemics in refugee settings in Central Africa (1993-1995).en
dc.contributor.departmentEpicentre, Paris, France.en
dc.identifier.journalPloS oneen
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