• Directly observed antiretroviral therapy: a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised clinical trials.

      Ford, Nathan; Nachega, Jean B; Engel, Mark E; Mills, Edward J; Médecins Sans Frontières, Cape Town, Western Cape, South Africa. (2009-11-30)
      BACKGROUND: Directly observed therapy has been recommended to improve adherence for patients with HIV infection who are on highly active antiretroviral therapy, but the benefit and cost-effectiveness of this approach has not been established conclusively. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis of randomised trials of directly observed versus self-administered antiretroviral treatment. METHODS: We did duplicate searches of databases (from inception to July 27, 2009), searchable websites of major HIV conferences (up to July, 2009), and lay publications and websites (March-July, 2009) to identify randomised trials assessing directly observed therapy to promote adherence to antiretroviral therapy in adults. Our primary outcome was virological suppression at study completion. We calculated relative risks (95% CIs), and pooled estimates using a random-effects method. FINDINGS: 12 studies met our inclusion criteria; four of these were done in groups that were judged to be at high risk of poor adherence (drug users and homeless people). Ten studies reported on the primary outcome (n=1862 participants); we calculated a pooled relative risk of 1.04 (95% CI 0.91-1.20, p=0.55), and noted moderate heterogeneity between the studies (I(2)= 53.8%, 95% CI 0-75.7, p=0.0247) for directly observed versus self-administered treatment. INTERPRETATION: Directly observed antiretroviral therapy seems to offer no benefit over self-administered treatment, which calls into question the use of such an approach to support adherence in the general patient population. FUNDING: None.
    • Life expectancy of persons receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries: a cohort analysis from Uganda

      Mills, Edward J; Bakanda, Celestin; Birungi, Josephine; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Cooper, Curtis L; Nachega, Jean B; Dybul, Mark; Hogg, Robert S; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; The AIDS Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda; British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (American College of Physicians, 2011-07-18)
      Little is known about the effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on life expectancy in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Low lopinavir plasma or hair concentrations explain second-line protease inhibitor failures in a resource-limited setting.

      van Zyl, Gert Uves; van Mens, Thijs E; McIlleron, Helen; Zeier, Michele; Nachega, Jean B; Decloedt, Eric; Malavazzi, Carolina; Smith, Peter; Huang, Yong; van der Merwe, Lize; et al. (2011-04)
      In resource-limited settings, many patients, with no prior protease inhibitor (PI) treatment on a second-line, high genetic barrier, ritonavir-boosted PI-containing regimen have virologic failure.