• Adults receiving HIV care before the start of antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa: patient outcomes and associated risk factors

      Bastard, Mathieu; Nicolay, Nathalie; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Balkan, Suna; Poulet, Elisabeth; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013-12-15)
      Gaining understanding of the period before antiretroviral therapy (ART) is needed to improve treatment outcomes and to reduce HIV transmission. This study describes the cascade of enrollment in HIV care, pre-ART follow-up, and predictors of mortality and lost to follow-up (LTFU) before ART initiation.
    • Adverse events associated with nevirapine use in pregnancy: a systematic review and meta-analysis

      Ford, N; Calmy, A; Andrieux-Meyer, I; Hargreaves, S; Mills, E J; Shubber, Z; Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland. nathan.ford@msf.org (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013-04-24)
      The risk of adverse drug events associated with nevirapine (NVP) is suggested to be greater in pregnant women. We conducted a systematic review and meta-analysis of severe adverse events in HIV-positive women who initiated NVP while pregnant.
    • Barriers and facilitators to combined ART initiation in pregnant women with HIV: lessons learnt from a PMTCT B+ pilot program in Swaziland

      Parker, L A; Jobanputra, K; Okello, V; Nhlangamandla, M; Mazibuko, S; Kourline, T; Kerschberger, B; Pavlopoulos, E; Teck, R (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015-01-26)
      In January 2013, Swaziland launched a PMTCT B+ implementation study in rural Shiselweni. We aimed to identify patient and health service determinants of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART) initiation, to help guide national implementation of PMTCT B+.
    • Brief Report: Decentralizing ART Supply for Stable HIV Patients to Community-Based Distribution Centers: Program Outcomes From an Urban Context in Kinshasa, DRC

      Vogt, F; Kalenga, L; Lukela, J; Salumu, F; Diallo, I; Nico, E; Lampart, E; Van den Bergh, R; Shah, S; Ogundahunsi, O; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2017-02-14)
    • Care in crises: Nursing and humanitarian aid

      Freeman, A (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018-07)
    • Cascade of HIV Care and Population Biral Suppression in a High-Burden Region of Kenya

      Maman, D; Zeh, C; Mukui, I; Kirubi, B; Masson, S; Opolo, V; Szumilin, E; Riche, B; Etard, JF (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015-07-31)
      Direct measurement of antiretroviral treatment (ART) program indicators essential for evidence-based planning and evaluation - especially HIV incidence, population viral load, and ART eligibility - is rare in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • CD4 count slope and mortality in HIV-infected patients on antiretroviral therapy: multicohort analysis from South Africa

      Hoffmann, Christopher J; Schomaker, Michael; Fox, Matthew P; Mutevedzi, Portia; Giddy, Janet; Prozesky, Hans; Wood, Robin; Garone, Daniela B; Egger, Matthias; Boulle, Andrew; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013-05-01)
      In many resource-limited settings monitoring of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) is based on the current CD4 count, with limited access to HIV RNA tests or laboratory diagnostics. We examined whether the CD4 count slope over 6 months could provide additional prognostic information.
    • CD4+ cell count at antiretroviral therapy initiation and economic restoration in rural Uganda

      Venkataramani, Atheendar S; Thirumurthy, Harsha; Haberer, Jessica E; Boum, Yap; Siedner, Mark J; Kembabazi, Annet; Hunt, Peter W; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David R; Tsai, Alexander C (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-01-08)
      To determine whether earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with better economic outcomes.
    • CE: Inside an Ebola Treatment Unit: A Nurse's Report

      Wilson, D (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015-11-10)
      : A firsthand account of combating Ebola in West Africa.
    • Cost and cost-effectiveness of switching from d4T or AZT to a TDF-based first-line regimen in a resource-limited setting in rural Lesotho

      Jouquet, Guillaume; Bygrave, Helen; Kranzer, Katharina; Ford, Nathan; Gadot, Laurent; Lee, Janice; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Goemaere, Eric; Vlahakis, Natalie; Trivino, Laura; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-11-01)
      Latest World Health Organization guidelines recommend shifting away from Stavudine (d4T)-based regimens due to severe side effects. However, widespread replacement of d4T by Tenofovir (TDF) or Zidovudine (AZT) is hampered by cost concerns.
    • Depression During Pregnancy and the Postpartum Among HIV-Infected Women on Antiretroviral Therapy in Uganda

      Kaida, Angela; Matthews, Lynn T; Ashaba, Scholastic; Tsai, Alexander C; Kanters, Steve; Robak, Magdalena; Psaros, Christina; Kabakyenga, Jerome; Boum, Yap; Haberer, Jessica E; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-12-01)
      Among HIV-infected women, perinatal depression compromises clinical, maternal, and child health outcomes. Antiretroviral therapy (ART) is associated with lower depression symptom severity but the uniformity of effect through pregnancy and postpartum periods is unknown.
    • Drug resistance and viral tropism in HIV-1 subtype C-infected patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: implications for future treatment options

      Singh, Ashika; Sunpath, Henry; Green, Taryn N; Padayachi, Nagavelli; Hiramen, Keshni; Lie, Yolanda; Anton, Elizabeth D; Murphy, Richard; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-11-01)
      Drug resistance poses a significant challenge for the successful application of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) globally. Furthermore, emergence of HIV-1 isolates that preferentially use CXCR4 as a coreceptor for cell entry, either as a consequence of natural viral evolution or HAART use, may compromise the efficacy of CCR5 antagonists as alternative antiviral therapy.
    • Emergency psychiatric care in North Kivu in the Democratic Republic of the Congo

      Goodfriend, M; ter Horst, R; Pintaldi, G; Junker, A; Frielingsdorf, H; Depeyrot, J; Matasci, L; Moroni, C; Musengetsi, A; Shanks, L (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-10-15)
    • Female Genital Schistosomiasis and HIV: Research urgently needed to improve understanding of the health impacts of this important co-infection

      O’Brien, DP; Ford, N; Djirmay, AG; Calmy, A; Vitoria, M; Jensen, TO; Christinet, V (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2019-01)
      Evidence suggests that there are important interactions between HIV and Female Genital Schistosomiasis (FGS) that may have significant effects on individual and population health. However, the exact way they interact and the health impacts of the interactions are not well understood. In this paper we discuss what is known about the interactions between FGS and HIV, and the potential impact of the interactions. This includes the likelihood that FGS is an important health problem for HIV positive women in schistosoma-endemic areas potentially associated with an increased risk of mortality, cancer and infertility. Additionally, it may be significantly impacting the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa by making young women more susceptible to HIV. We call for immediate action and argue that research is urgently required to address these knowledge gaps and propose a research agenda to achieve this.
    • For Family-Centered Differentiated Service Delivery for HIV

      Grimsrud, A; Bygrave, H; Wilkinson, L (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018-08-15)
      Differentiated care, or differentiated service delivery (DSD), is increasingly being promoted as one of the possible ways to address and improve access, quality, and efficiency of HIV prevention, care, and treatment. Family-centered care has long been promoted within the provision of HIV services, but the full benefits have not necessarily been realized. In this article, we bring together these two approaches and make the case for how family-centered DSD can offer benefits to both people affected by HIV and the health system. Family-centered DSD approaches are presented for HIV testing and antiretroviral therapy (ART) delivery, referencing policies, best practice examples, and evidence from the field. With differentiated family-centered ART delivery, the potential efficiencies gained by extending ART refills can both benefit clients by reducing the frequency and intensity of contact with the health service and lead to health system gains by not requiring multiple providers to care for one family. A family-centered DSD approach should also be leveraged along the HIV care cascade in the provision of prevention technologies and mobilizing family members to receive regular HIV testing. Furthermore, a family-centered lens should be applied wherever DSD is implemented to ensure that, for example, adolescents who are pregnant receive an adapted package of quality care.
    • High incidence of subcutaneous emphysema in children in a Somali refugee cAMP during measles outbreak.

      Moons, Peter; Thallinger, Monica (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-01)
      During an outbreak of measles in a refugee camp in Ethiopia, 9 patients (age range 4 months to 18 years) were diagnosed with subcutaneous emphysema. Incidence of this rare complication of measles in this refugee camp was higher than previously reported. We hypothesize that the high incidence is most likely related to poor physical state of the refugee population with high rates of malnutrition.
    • Humanitarian Surgery: A Call to Action for Anesthesiologists

      Marchbein, D (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2013-11)
    • Impact and programmatic implications of routine viral load monitoring in Swaziland

      Jobanputra, Kiran; Parker, Lucy Anne; Azih, Charles; Okello, Velephi; Maphalala, Gugu; Jouquet, Guillaume; Kerschberger, Bernhard; Mekeidje, Calorine; Cyr, Joanne; Mafikudze, Arnold; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-05-28)
      To assess the programmatic quality (coverage of testing, counselling and retesting), cost, and outcomes (viral suppression, treatment decisions), of routine viral load (VL) monitoring in Swaziland.
    • The impact of lay counselors on HIV testing rates: Quasi-experimental evidence from lay counselor redeployment in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

      Hu, J; Geldsetzer, P; Steele, SJ; Matthews, P; Ortblad, K; Solomon, T; Shroufi, A; van Cutsem, G; Tanser, F; Wyke, S; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2018-06-14)
      This study aimed to determine the causal effect of the number of lay counselors employed at a primary care clinic in rural South Africa on the number of clinic-based HIV tests performed.
    • Implementation and Operational Research: Feasibility of Using Tuberculin Skin Test Screening for Initiation of 36-Month Isoniazid Preventive Therapy in HIV-Infected Patients in Resource-Constrained Settings

      Huerga, H; Mueller, Y; Ferlazzo, G; Mpala, Q; Bevilacqua, P; Vasquez, B; Noël Mekiedje, C; Ouattara, A; Mchunu, G; Weyenga, HO; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2016-04-01)
      The tuberculin skin test (TST) can be used to identify HIV-infected people who would benefit the most from long-term isoniazid preventive therapy (IPT). However, in resource-constrained settings, implementation of the TST can be challenging. The objectives of this study were to assess the feasibility of implementing the TST for IPT initiation and to estimate the proportion of TST-positive incidence among HIV-positive patients in 2 high tuberculosis and HIV burden settings.