• Adherence to the combination of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine and artesunate in the Maheba refugee settlement, Zambia.

      Depoortere, E; Guthmann, J P; Sipilanyambe, N; Nkandu, E; Fermon, F; Balkan, S; Legros, D; Epicentre, Paris, France. evelyn.depoortere@msf.be (Wiley-Blackwell, 2004-01)
      Artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) is one strategy recommended to increase cure rates in malaria and to contain resistance to Plasmodium falciparum. In the Maheba refugee settlement, children aged 5 years or younger with a confirmed diagnosis of uncomplicated falciparum malaria are treated with the combination of sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine (1 day) and artesunate (3 days). To measure treatment adherence, home visits were carried out the day after the last treatment dose. Patients who had any treatment dose left were considered certainly non-adherent. Other patients' classification was based on the answers to the questionnaire: patients whose caretakers stated the child had received the treatment regimen exactly as prescribed were considered probably adherent; all other patients were considered probably non-adherent. Reasons for non-adherence were assessed. We found 21.2% (95% CI [15.0-28.4]) of the patients to be certainly non-adherent, 39.4% (95% CI [31.6-47.6]) probably non-adherent, and 39.4% (95% CI [31.6-47.6]) probably adherent. Insufficient explanation by the dispenser was identified as an important reason for non-adherence. When considering the use of ACT, the issue of patient adherence remains challenging. However, it should not be used as an argument against the introduction of ACT. For these treatment regimens to remain efficacious on a long-term basis, specific and locally adapted strategies need to be implemented to ensure completion of the treatment.
    • Burundi: childbirth in a developing country.

      Chadney, S; Médecins Sans Frontières. (2006-05)
    • A comparison of narrative exposure therapy, supportive counseling, and psychoeducation for treating posttraumatic stress disorder in an african refugee settlement.

      Neuner, F; Schauer, M; Klaschik, C; Karunakara, U; Elbert, T; Department of Clinical Psychology, University of Konstanz, Konstanz, Germany. frank.neuner@uni-konstanz.de (2004-08)
      Little is known about the usefulness of psychotherapeutic approaches for traumatized refugees who continue to live in dangerous conditions. Narrative exposure therapy (NET) is a short-term approach based on cognitive-behavioral therapy and testimony therapy. The efficacy of narrative exposure therapy was evaluated in a randomized controlled trial. Sudanese refugees living in a Ugandan refugee settlement (N = 43) who were diagnosed as suffering from posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) either received 4 sessions of NET, 4 sessions of supportive counseling (SC), or psychoeducation (PE) completed in 1 session. One year after treatment, only 29% of the NET participants but 79% of the SC group and 80% of the PE group still fulfilled PTSD criteria. These results indicate that NET is a promising approach for the treatment of PTSD for refugees living in unsafe conditions.
    • Household screening and multidrug-resistant tuberculosis

      Cox, H; van Cutsem, G; Burnet Institute for Medical Research and Public Health, Centre for Population Health, Melbourne, Australia; Médecins Sans Frontières, Cape Town, South Africa (2010-12-09)
      Of the estimated half a million people who develop multidrug resistant (MDR) tuberculosis each year, less than 7% are diagnosed and only 1 in 5 of these have access to eff ective treatment.1 To control this epidemic, dramatically increased efforts are required to scale up case detection and treatment provision. In The Lancet, Mercedes Becerra and colleagues2 report the yield of additional MDR tuberculosis diagnoses that are found by screening household contacts of index cases in Lima, Peru. This study—the largest of its kind to date—found that more than 2% of 4503 household contacts had active tuberculosis at the time the index case was diagnosed. Incident tuberculosis was also found at a rate of 1624 cases per 100 000 person-years over 4 years follow-up. These results support recommendations for active screening of household contacts of people with MDR tuberculosis,3 and provide valuable lessons for other programmes striving to improve case detection and to reduce community transmission of MDR tuberculosis.
    • Involving Traditional Healers in AIDS Education and Counselling in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review

      King, R; Homsy, J; Médecins Sans Frontières-Switzerland in Kampala, Uganda. (1997)
    • Russia: Sex, Drugs, and AIDS and MSF.

      Veeken, H; Médecins Sans Frontières, Amsterdam, Netherlands. hans_veeken@amsterdam.msj.org (Published by: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 1998-01-10)
    • Village-based AIDS prevention in a rural district in Uganda.

      Schopper, D; Doussantousse, S; Ayiga, N; Ezatirale, G; Idro, W J; Homsy, J; Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland. (Oxford Journals, 1995-06)
      OBJECTIVE: To design, implement and evaluate a village-based AIDS prevention programme in a rural district in north-western Uganda. A baseline KAP survey of the general population was carried out to design a district-wide information campaign and condom promotion programme. Eighteen months later the impact achieved was measured through a second KAP survey, using the same methodology. METHODS: Anonymous structured interviews were conducted in March 1991 and October 1992 with 1486 and 1744 randomly selected individuals age 15-49, respectively. RESULTS: At 18 months, 60% of respondents had participated in an information session in the past year (47% women, 71% men) and 42% had received a pamphlet about AIDS (26% women, 58% men). Knowledge about AIDS, high initially (94%), reached 98%. More respondents knew that the incubation period is longer than one year (from 29% to 40%), and were willing to take care of a PWA (from 60% to 77%). Knowledge about condoms increased from 26 to 63% in women and 57 to 91% in men. Ever use of condoms among persons having engaged in casual sex in the past year increased from 6 to 33% in women, and 27 to 48% in men. Fifty per cent of condom users criticized lack of regular access to condoms. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first documented example of the impact a village-based AIDS prevention programme can achieve in a rural African community. Critical areas to be improved were identified, such as: women must be given better access to information, more attention must be paid to explain the asymptomatic state of HIV infection in appropriate terms, and condom social marketing must be developed.