• Artesunate versus quinine in the treatment of severe falciparum malaria in African children (AQUAMAT): an open-label, randomised trial

      Dondorp, Arjen M; Fanello, Caterina I; Hendriksen, Ilse C E; Gomes, Ermelinda; Seni, Amir; Chhaganlal, Kajal D; Bojang, Kalifa; Olaosebikan, Rasaq; Anunobi, Nkechinyere; Maitland, Kathryn; et al. (2010-11-08)
      Severe malaria is a major cause of childhood death and often the main reason for paediatric hospital admission in sub-Saharan Africa. Quinine is still the established treatment of choice, although evidence from Asia suggests that artesunate is associated with a lower mortality. We compared parenteral treatment with either artesunate or quinine in African children with severe malaria.
    • Association between older age and adverse outcomes on antiretroviral therapy: a cohort analysis of programme data from nine countries.

      Greig, Jane; Casas, Esther C; O'Brien, Daniel P; Mills, Edward J; Ford, Nathan; Médecins Sans Frontières, London, UK. jane.greig@london.msf.org (2012-07-31)
      Recent studies have highlighted the increased risk of adverse outcomes among older patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We report on the associations between older age and adverse outcomes in HIV/AIDS antiretroviral programmes across 17 programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Coadministration of lopinavir/ritonavir and rifampicin in HIV and tuberculosis co-infected adults in South Africa

      Murphy, R A; Marconi, V C; Gandhi, R T; Kuritzkes, D R; Sunpath, H; Medical Unit, Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders, New York, New York, United States of America (Public Library of Science, 2012-09-28)
      In HIV-infected patients receiving rifampicin-based treatment for tuberculosis (TB), the dosage of lopinavir/ritonavir (LPV/r) is adjusted to prevent sub-therapeutic lopinavir concentrations. In this setting, South African clinicians were advised to administer super-boosted LPV/r (400 mg/400 mg) twice daily, instead of standard dosed LPV/r (400 mg/100 mg) twice daily. We sought to determine--in routine practice--the tolerability and HIV treatment outcomes associated with super-boosted LPV/r compared to unadjusted LPV/r in combination with rifampicin-based TB treatment.
    • Earlier versus later start of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with tuberculosis.

      Blanc, F-X; Sok, T; Laureillard, D; Borand, L; Rekacewicz, C; Nerrienet, E; Madec, Y; Marcy, O; Chan, S; Prak, N; et al. (2011-10-20)
      Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy.
    • Life expectancy of persons receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries: a cohort analysis from Uganda

      Mills, Edward J; Bakanda, Celestin; Birungi, Josephine; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Cooper, Curtis L; Nachega, Jean B; Dybul, Mark; Hogg, Robert S; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; The AIDS Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda; British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (American College of Physicians, 2011-07-18)
      Little is known about the effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on life expectancy in sub-Saharan Africa.