• Factors associated with Condom Use Problems during Vaginal Sex with main and non-main partners

      DʼAnna, L H; Korosteleva, O; Warner, L; Douglas, J; Paul, S; Metcalf, C; McIlvaine, E; Malotte, C K; California State University, Long Beach, Center for Health Care Innovation, and Department of Math and Statistics, LongBeach, CA 90840, USA. laura.d’anna@csulb.edu (2012-09-01)
      Incorrect condom use is a common problem that can undermine their prevention impact. We assessed the prevalence of 2 condom use problems, breakage/slippage and partial use, compared problems by partnership type, and examined associations with respondent, partner, and partnership characteristics.
    • Global trade and access to medicines: AIDS treatments in Thailand.

      Wilson, D; Cawthorne, P; Ford, N; Aongsonwang, S; Médecins Sans Frontières, Bangkok, Thailand. msfbthai@asianet.co.th (Elsevier, 1999-11-27)
    • Impact of the shift from NCHS growth reference to WHO(2006) growth standards in a therapeutic feeding programme in Niger.

      Minetti, A; Shams Eldin, M; Defourny, I; Harczi, G; Epicentre, 75011 Paris, France. andrea.minetti@epicentre.msf.org (2009-10)
      OBJECTIVES: To describe the implementation of the WHO(2006) growth standards in a therapeutic feeding programme. METHODS: Using programme monitoring data from 21,769 children 6-59 months admitted to the Médecins Sans Frontières therapeutic feeding programme during 2007, we compared characteristics at admission, type of care and outcomes for children admitted before and after the shift to the WHO(2006) standards. Admission criteria were bipedal oedema, MUAC <110 mm, or weight-for-height (WFH) of <-70% of the median (NCHS) before mid-May 2007, and WFH <-3 z score (WHO(2006)) after mid-May 2007. RESULTS: Children admitted with the WHO(2006) standards were more likely to be younger, with a higher proportion of males, and less malnourished (mean WFH -3.6 z score vs. mean WFH -4.6 z score). They were less likely to require hospitalization or intensive care (28.4%vs. 77%; 12.8%vs. 36.5%) and more likely to be treated exclusively on an outpatient basis (71.6%vs. 23%). Finally, they experienced better outcomes (cure rate: 89%vs. 71.7%, death rate: 2.7%vs. 6.4%, default rate: 6.7%vs. 12.3%). CONCLUSIONS: In this programme, the WHO(2006) standards identify a larger number of malnourished children at an earlier stage of disease facilitating their treatment success.
    • Multidrug-resistant chronic osteomyelitis complicating war injury in Iraqi civilians

      Murphy, Richard A; Ronat, Jean-Baptiste; Fakhri, Rasheed M; Herard, Patrick; Blackwell, Nikki; Abgrall, Sophie; Anderson, Deverick J; Médecins Sans Frontières/Doctors Without Borders, New York, New York; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Médecins Sans Frontières, Amman, Jordan; University of Queensland, Brisbane, Australia; Division of Infectious Diseases, Avicenne Hospital, Bobigny, France; Division of Infectious Diseases, Duke University Medical Center, Durham, North Carolina (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-07)
      War-related orthopedic injury is frequently complicated by environmental contamination and delays in management, placing victims at increased risk for long-term infectious complications. We describe, among Iraqi civilians with war-related chronic osteomyelitis, the bacteriology of infection at the time of admission.
    • TRIPS, pharmaceutical patents, and access to essential medicines: a long way from Seattle to Doha.

      't Hoen, E; Globalisation Project of Medecins sans Frontieres ("MSF") Access to Essential Medicines Campaign. (Chicago Journal of International Law, 2002)