Now showing items 21-40 of 111

    • Mental health literacy of internally displaced Syrian young people and their parents in Syria: paving the way for mental health education and promotion in vulnerable communities.

      Hitchman, Eleanor; Slewa-Younan, Shameran; Cramond, Vanessa; White, Kate; Carrion-Martin, Isidro; Jorm, Anthony F.; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      4. Objectives 4.1 Primary objective To determine levels of MHL relating to trauma related mental health disorders, namely posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) and depression among the displaced Syrian young people in northern Syria (see study population) . 4.2 Specific objectives 1. To estimate MHL relating to PTSD (and Depression) in a group of displaced Syrian young people (13-17 years old) and the parents of children (age 8-12 years old) pertaining to: a. Problem recognition (including “self-recognition”) b. Beliefs about the severity of the problem described and its prevalence in the target population c. Beliefs about causes and risk factors d. Beliefs about how best to support someone with PTSD/depression e. Beliefs about the helpfulness of specific treatments and treatment providers f. Beliefs about likely outcome with and without treatment g. Beliefs about possible barriers to treatment h. Stigma and perceived discrimination towards someone with PTSD/depression i. 2. To determine associations between specific aspects of MHL as outlined above, and individuals’ demographic characteristics (age, gender, religion, ethnicity, lengthen of displacement etc.) and symptom levels. 3. To estimate the prevalence of mental health distress (major depression, anxiety disorders or suicidality ) using the Self Reporting Questionnaire (SRQ-20) in care takers of children 8-12 years old; 4. To estimate the prevalence of constructs of intrusion, avoidance and arousal in children 8-17 years of age in the study population; 5. To estimate the prevalence of self-reported depression in children 8-17 years old. The categories specified in objective 1 above were chosen because they were considered to be the aspects of MHL most likely to be of interest in informing the determinants of mental health and quality of life in the proposed population. Objective 2 which seeks to examine the associations between specific aspects of MHL and individuals’ demographic characteristics and symptoms levels is important because associations of this kind can indicate specific targets for health promotion programs.
    • Morbidity, healthcare needs and barriers to access medical care amongst local and displaced populations in west Dar’a and Quneitra, Southern Syria.

      Homan, Tobias; Shoaib, Muhammad; de Rosa, Allan; Alfadel, Imad Aldin; Stein, Susan; Khalaileh, Fadi; Al-Khalouf, Nahed; Bil, Karla; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Objectives 2.1 Primary objective To determine the health care needs for local population and IDP’s in west Dar’a and Quneitra by estimating the prevalence of underlying morbidities, vaccination coverage and identifying barriers to access to health care, in order to obtain a baseline that can guide MSF and actor response. 2.2 Secondary objectives The relevance of subjects for the (secondary) objective(s) has been informed by insights from reports of, and explorative meetings with MSF and medical NGOs active in southern Syria (section 3.2.3). Of the secondary objectives identified, similar objectives are reflected in MSF-ERB approved protocols for surveys conducted in the region. We formulated the objectives (and related indicators on page 15) as much as possible on basis of these approved secondary objectives . I. To describe the socio-demographic characteristics of the surveyed population including age, gender and household characteristics. II. To estimate the prevalence of self-reported morbidities in previous two weeks, an estimate of the prevalence of non-communicable diseases, and the main reasons for requiring medical care. III. To estimate the vaccination coverage for key vaccine preventable diseases in children aged 6-59 months. IV. To characterise health care utilisation, the degree of access to healthcare for common morbidities in the population (health seeking behviour) and determine the most common barriers to access to health care. V. To estimate the global acute malnutrition [GAM] rate of in children aged 6-59 months. VI. To estimate the prevalence of conflict-related trauma experienced during the recall period. VII. To what extent maternal and reproductive health services are utilized by assessed crisis-affected women of 15-49 years of age in this area. VIII. To estimate the retrospective mortality and cause of mortality, over the past 6 months (since Ramadan 2017). IX. To better understand the configuration of the health system following the crisis, the characteristics of care-seeking and the quality of the services.
    • Retrospective mortality and baseline health survey in Kutupalong and Balukhali settlement camps, Bangladesh

      Siddiqui, Ruby; White, Kate; Guzek, John; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      2.1. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the scale of the emergency through measurement of crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age 2.2. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES  To describe the population in terms of age, sex and household composition;  To determine the coverage of measles, polio, MenACWY, DPT-Hib-HepB (Pentavalent), cholera (OCV) and pneumococcal virus (PCV) vaccination in 6-59 month olds;  To determine the rate of severe and global acute malnutrition in 6-59 month olds;  To identify the most prevalent morbidities in the population in the two weeks preceding the survey;  To describe the health seeking behaviour in terms of access to primary and secondary care;  To estimate crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age before and after the SPLA advance into Equatoria, South Sudan;  To identify major causes of death, by age group and sex;  To gain knowledge of violence-related events 2.1. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the scale of the emergency through measurement of crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age 2.2. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES  To describe the population in terms of age, sex and household composition;  To determine the coverage of measles, polio, MenACWY, DPT-Hib-HepB (Pentavalent), cholera (OCV) and pneumococcal virus (PCV) vaccination in 6-59 month olds;  To determine the rate of severe and global acute malnutrition in 6-59 month olds;  To identify the most prevalent morbidities in the population in the two weeks preceding the survey;  To describe the health seeking behaviour in terms of access to primary and secondary care;  To estimate crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age before and after the SPLA advance into Equatoria, South Sudan;  To identify major causes of death, by age group and sex;  To gain knowledge of violence-related events
    • Review of MSF-OCA surveillance and alert response in Freetown during the Ebola outbreak: lessons learned and challenges

      West, Kim; Greig, Jane; Lokuge, Kamalini; Caleo, Grazia; Stringer, Beverley; Korr, Gerit Solveig; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Aim: To reduce suffering, morbidity and mortality by containing and reducing the spread of Ebola Virus Disease (EVD), while preserving human dignity for the affected population in Sierra Leone. Purpose: To reduce and ultimately eliminate the transmission of EVD in a defined catchment population in Freetown. Objectives: • Provide epidemiological technical support to intensify surveillance, supervision of the alert response and enhanced case investigation in the defined area. • Assess and respond to current gaps in infection prevention and control, water and sanitation, and triage in health facilities within the defined area. • Assess community social mobilisation, health promotion, contact tracing and quarantine interventions in the defined area and respond to any gaps through advocacy towards the relevant pillar/organization and/or through direct MSF intervention. • Prioritise MSF and health staff safety & biosecurity at all times • Medical (non-Ebola) and humanitarian needs of the population are monitored, recorded, analysed and responded to through advocacy or MSF action.
    • Prevalence of depression, anxiety and posttraumatic stress related symptoms in the Kashmir Valley – a cross sectional study, 2015.

      Housen, Tambri; Shah, Showkat; Janes, Simon; Pintaldi, Govanni; Lenglet, Annick; Ariti, Cono; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Objectives 1.5 Primary objective To estimate prevalence of mental health related problems, specifically depression/anxiety and posttraumatic stress symptoms in the Kashmir Valley and to determine the accessibility to mental health services. 1.6 Specific objectives • Using validated screening tools determine the percentage of people with depression, anxiety and PTSD symptoms in Kashmir; • To correlate scores obtained on validated mental health screening tools with individual psychiatric evaluations using the mini international neuropsychiatric interview (MINI); • To explore local knowledge and perceptions of mental illness in Kashmir; • To determine the level of access to mental heath services across Kashmir; • To identify mental health service needs perceived by the Kashmiri community. 1.7 Goal To provide an updated insight into current mental health needs in Kashmir, which will help MSF to increase relevance and impact of current activities in Kashmir and to advocate for supportive programming and policy review.
    • Predicting Visceral Leishmaniasis in HIV Infected Patients (PreLeisH)

      Griensven, JV; Diro, Ermias; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Aim To study the asymptomatic period preceding the onset of active VL in HIV‐infected individuals from VL endemic regions in Ethiopia as an avenue to develop an evidence‐based screen and treat strategy to prevent progression to active VL.Primary: 1. To estimate the prevalence of asymptomatic Leishmania infection . 2. To estimate the incidence rate of asymptomatic Leishmania infection. 3. To describe the evolution of Leishmania infection markers over time. 4. To estimate the incidence rate of active VL. 5. To identify risk factors associated with the development of active VL. 6. To translate these risk factors into a clinical prognostic tool to identify individuals at high risk to develop active VL within 12 months . Secondary: 1. To identify patterns in host immune markers that are associated with asymptomatic Leishmania infection. 2. To describe the evolution of host immune markers over time. 3. To identify patterns in host immune markers that are associated with treatment failure. 4. To identify patterns in host immune markers that are associated with VL relapse.
    • Risk factors for diagnosed Noma in North West Nigeria, 2017

      Lenglet, Annick; Farley, Elise; Trienekens, Suzan; Amirtharajah, Mohana; Bil, Karla; van der Kam, Saskia; Jiya, Nma M.; Huisman, Geke; Adetunji, Adeniyi Semiyu; Stringer, Beverley; et al. (2018-07)
      Background Noma is an orofacial gangrene that rapidly eats away at the hard and soft tissue as well as the bones in the face. Noma has a 90% mortality rate, and the disease affects mostly children under the age of 5. Little is known about Noma as the majority of cases live in underserved, difficult to reach locations. MSF runs projects at the Noma Children’s Hospital in Sokoto, northern Nigeria and currently assists with surgical interventions for the patients who have survived and sought care at the hospital. Community outreach and active case finding are also taking place. These projects place MSF in a unique position to study Noma, and to add to the scant body of knowledge around the disease. Aims and objectives Aim To identify risk factors for Noma in north west Nigeria in terms of epidemiological (demographic characteristics, medical history), socio-economic-behavioural aspects and access to health care in order to better guide existing prevention strategies. Specific objectives 1. To understand concepts and perceptions of Noma within the population of northwestern Nigeria, specifically those affected (caretakers of Noma cases) by the disease, and controls matching these cases. To describe the epidemiological profile of all cases of Noma that have been treated at the MSF Noma Children’s Hospital from August 2015 until June 2016; 2. To describe the current Noma patient’s clinical history before the onset of the disease, the start of the disease and the care/treatment sought as well as the impact of Noma on the patient; 3. To assess Noma risk factors by comparing cases enrolled at the Noma Children’s Hospital and controls matched to cases by sex, age, and village of residence; All of these objectives are in order to assess if there are intervention opportunities in the unique Nigerian setting that could prevent further Noma case development. Methods 1) Qualitative phase: focus groups will take place with care takers (guardians or parents) of cases as well as key informant interviews with health care workers to better understand the local concepts, vocabulary and expressions used to describe Noma in this part of Nigeria. 2) Descriptive epidemiology: description of all available medical, nutritional and mental health data associated with the Noma patients operated on at the Noma Children’s Hospital over the last year. 3) Case control study: assessing risk factors for Noma using care takers of cases recruited from the Noma Children’s Hospital and care takers of controls that are recruited from cases village of residence and matched by age and sex. Outcomes • Initiate the MSF operational research agenda around Noma in Nigeria; • Improved understanding of local beliefs, traditions and language used to describe Noma; • Improved understanding of Noma patients at the Sokoto Children’s hospital; • Identification of preventable risk factors for Noma development in our patients; • Integration of information obtained into outreach programming, improved community engagements, options for preventative campaigns and overall improved clinical and mental health care of Noma patients and caretakers in the MSF project.  
    • The Impact of digital X-ray with Teleradiology on Case Management in Mweso, Democratic Republic of Congo

      Kosack, Cara; Halton, Jarred; Greig, Jane; Shanks, Leslie; Spijker, Saskia; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Study objectives 3.1 Primary objective To demonstrate the extent of change in patient management through the availability of digital X-ray with teleradiology consultation. 3.2 Secondary objectives a) To demonstrate the extent of change in patient diagnosis through the availability of digital X-ray with teleradiology consultation. b) To demonstrate the extent of change in patient diagnosis and management in the subgroup of patients with chest pathologies through the availability of digital X-ray with teleradiology consultation. c) To estimate if the extent of change in diagnosis and management is different in patients < 5 years of age versus ≥5 years of age.
    • A prospective, randomized, controlled trial of negative-pressure wound therapy use in conflict-related extremity wounds

      Alga, Andreas; Bashaireh, Khaldoon; Wong, Sidney; Lundgren, Kalle; von Schreeb, Johan; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Extremity wounds and fractures constitute the majority of conflict-related traumatic injuries, both for civilians (1) and combatants (2). Conflict-related injuries often result in soft and boney tissue being contaminated with foreign material, generally leading to secondary infection (3,4). Negative-pressure wound therapy (NPWT) is widely used in the treatment of wounds and is considered to promote wound healing and prevent infectious complications. The technique involves the application of a wound dressing through which a negative pressure is applied. Any wound and tissue fluid is drawn away from the area and collected into a canister. Due to a plastic film overlaying the wound the risk of wound contamination is reduced. NPWT is supported for use in a range of surgical applications, including after or in between debridements as a bridge to definite closure of soft tissue wounds (5). The technique has previously been used in the treatment of acute conflict-related wounds with satisfactory results (6–8). Cochrane reviews of NPWT for the treatment of chronic wounds (9) and surgical wounds (10) were inconclusive due to the lack of suitably powered, high-quality trials. A recent systematic review of randomized, controlled trials (RCTs) of NPWT for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds concluded there is a lack of evidence and that good RCTs are needed (11). For the use in limb trauma, NPWT is considered suitable for complex soft tissue injuries (12). NPWT appears to be an effective and safe adjunctive treatment of high-energy combat wounds but existing results are retrospective and lack follow-up (13). The support of RCTs is needed to establish best treatment strategies. Summary of potential risks and benefits Both treatment methods (NPWT and conventional dressings) are well established and used in Jordan for the treatment of acute and chronic wounds. As neither of the two treatment modalities are known to be better in terms of outcome neither patient group may be regarded as receiving preferential treatment. NPWT is generally considered a safe treatment method. Potential benefits are shortened healing time and fewer infectious complications. Potential risks are pain, mainly associated with dressing changes (14) and bleeding, predominantly minor bleeding from granulation tissue (15). Conventional wound dressing has the potential benefit of being a safe treatment method used for many years. Since this method permits air into the wound there is a potential risk of contamination and the development of wound infection. Objectives We aim to evaluate the efficacy and safety of NPWT in the treatment of traumatic extremity wounds in a context associated with a high level of contamination and infection.
    • Malnutrition, morbidity and vaccination coverage in Bokoro District, Chad, 2016 (Final Survey) 1613C

      Lenglet, Annick; Vernier, Larissa; Monge, Susana; White, Kate; Sang, Sibylle; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      3 OBJECTIVES 3.1 PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the impact of an integrated program targeted at preventing malnutrition on children under 5 years of age in Bokoro district. 3.2 SECONDARY OBJECTIVES - To describe the population in terms of age breakdown, sex, household composition etc. - To estimate overall mortality rate and under 5 mortality rate - To estimate the prevalence of severe and global acute malnutrition (SAM and GAM) in the under 5 year age group and in children between 6 and 23 months that are the specific target of MSF prevention activities; - To estimate the coverage of insecticide treated bednets in the community; - To estimate the coverage of soap and hygiene practices in the community - To estimate coverage of plumpydoz (nutritional food) in children between 6 months and 2 years of age and to investigate practices around plumpydoz.
    • Malnutrition, morbidity and vaccination coverage in Bokoro District, Chad, 2016 (Mid Term Survey).

      Lenglet, Annick; Monge, Susana; Ndumbi, Patricia; Nyarwangu, Justin; Hamdan, Musa; Cramond, Vanessa; Sang, Sibylle; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      3 OBJECTIVES 3.1 PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the impact of an integrated program targeted at preventing malnutrition on children under 5 years of age in Bokoro district. 3.2 SECONDARY OBJECTIVES - To describe the population in terms of age breakdown, sex, household composition etc. - To estimate overall mortality rate and under 5 mortality rate - To estimate the prevalence of severe and global acute malnutrition (SAM and GAM) in the under 5 year age group and in children between 6 and 23 months that are the specific target of MSF prevention activities; - To estimate the coverage of insecticide treated bednets in the community; - To estimate the coverage of soap and hygiene practices in the community - To estimate coverage of plumpydoz (nutritional food) in children between 6 months and 2 years of age and to investigate practices around plumpydoz.
    • Review of maternal mortality cases in MSF-OCA projects 2015 (a capture-recapture study)

      Price, Debbie; Lenglet, Annick; Thoulass, Janine; Willrich, Niklas; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Aim To identify the best method to monitor maternal mortality in MSF-OCA facilities prospectively. Objectives/Research questions  Evaluate the current surveillance system for maternal mortality in MSF-OCA facilities  Estimate maternal mortality in MSF-OCA facilities for 2015  Identify contributing factors to maternal mortality in MSF-OCA facilities for 2015
    • Health and developmental outcomes of low-birth-weight infants born at the Centre de Référence d’Urgences Obstétricales (CRUO), Port-au-Prince, Haiti.

      Hillaire, Marjorie; Lenglet, Annick; Ariti, Cono; Ledger, Elizabeth; Reilly, Liam; Berthet, Marine; Faniyan, Olu; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Summary Title A prospective cohort study investigating health and developmental outcomes of low birth weight infants born at the Centre de Reference d’Urgences Obstretricales (CRUO), Port-au-Prince, Haiti. Primary objective: To describe and compare health and developmental outcomes between low birthweight (LBW) and normal weight infants up to 24 months post-partum, corrected for gestational age. Secondary objective To identify risk factors associated with negative health and developmental outcomes in LBW infants.
    • SURVEY OF PLASMODIUM FALCIPARUM SULFADOXINE/PYRIMETHAMINE (SP) RESISTANCE MARKERS IN MSF PROJECTS IN NORTH AND SOUTH KIVU, DR CONGO Short Title: SP Resistance Molecular Marker Prevalence Survey DRC

      de Wit, Marit; Rao, Bhargavi; Lassovski, Maryvonne; Ouabo, Adelaide; Badjo, Colette; Bousema, Teun; Roper, Cally; Okell, Lucy; Piriou, Erwan; Cibinda; et al. (2018-07)
      Primary Objective: To measure the prevalence of molecular markers of SP resistant malaria in North and South Kivu, DRC. Sulfadoxine/pyrimethamine (SP) forms the backbone of most malaria chemoprevention programmes in high endemicity settings, including intermittent preventative therapy in pregnancy and infants (IPTp and IPTi respectively) as well as seasonal malaria chemoprevention (SMC). P. falciparum parasite resistance to SP threatens recent triumphs preventing malaria infection in the most vulnerable risk groups. WHO guidance is that chemoprevention using SP may not be implemented when prevalence of the dhps K540E gene denoting SP resistance are greater than 50%. Simple, robust polymerase chain reaction (PCR) - based methods for molecular surveillance of resistance to SP have the potential to indicate whether SP-based chemoprevention programmes would be effective in areas where surveillance was conducted, but also to identify early stages of emerging resistance in order to advocate for alternative chemoprevention strategies.A minimum of 750 samples will be collected per province. Three sites per province will provide 250 samples assuming an estimated prevalence of 50% prevalence of dhps K540E gene with 95% confidence and 5% precision. This is also sufficient for robust estimation of the prevalence of dhps 581, an alternative critical marker. This sample size is calculated to estimate regional prevalence, i.e. for both South Kivu and North Kivu, and hence this study requires samples from multiple MSF sites (including from different MSF Operating Centre missions) e.g. Baraka, Kimbi and Lulingu amongst others in South Kivu and Mweso, Rutsuru and Walikale in North Kivu with a minimum total of 750 per province. If estimating specific prevalence in only one limited site, a large sample size would be required.
    • Determining sero-prevalence of antibodies against Hepatitis E during an acute outbreak scenario.

      Lenglet, Annick; Kamau, Charity; Boris, Hogema; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      OBJECTIVES 3.1 PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate sero prevalence of anti-HEV antibodies (IgG and IgM) in different age groups in Am Timam, Chad 3.2 SECONDARY OBJECTIVES • To determine individual risk factors associated with different anti-HEV antibody status during an acute outbreak; • To determine household level risk factors associated with different anti-HEV antibody status during an acute outbreak; • To compare the sero prevalence of anti-HEV antibodies (IgG and IgM) in different age groups at two different time periods during an acute HEV outbreak to inform our understanding of viral transmission dynamics in a population in this context; • To determine sero prevalence in different age groups of other jaundice causing agents (malaria, hepatitis A, B and C, leptospirosis and arboviral diseases such as yellow fever, viral haemorrhagic fever, Dengue and Rift valley fever; • To compare dried blood spots (DBS) with blood samples for detection of HEV IgM and IgG and HEV RNA through PCR; • To compare oral swabs with blood samples for the detection of HEV IgM and IgG and HEV RNA through PCR.
    • Evaluation of Second Line Antiretroviral Treatment Outcomes and Determinants in Epworth, MSF-OCA HIV Cohort, Zimbabwe

      Zizhou, Simukai; Gashu, Tadele; Ahmad, Bilal; Dhliwayo, Rumbidzai; Aluma, Theresa; Gonzalez, Lucia; Sang, Sibylle; Mesic, Anita; Otiato, Alice Ayuma; Belaye, Abi Kebra; et al. (2018-07)
      Summary Epworth poly-clinic is found in Epworth district, Harare. It is a clinic jointly run by Epworth local board (on behalf of the Ministry of Health and Child Care) and Médecins sans Frontiers (MSF). One of the major MSF activities in the clinic is early detection and management of patients who fail first line ART. Patients with elevated viral load (VL), HIV RNA greater than 1000 copies/ml, undergo five to six sessions of two weekly enhanced adherence counseling (EAC) support. After enhanced adherence counseling sessions, those with elevated repeat VL test result are then switched to second line ART. Since the number of patients on second line ART is growing, there is an increased need to know the outcomes of second line ART and predictors of treatment failure. The main objective of this study is to evaluate the prognosis and determinants of second line ART regimen for cohort of HIV patients in Epworth MoH/MSF poly-clinic, Zimbabwe. The study will also identify cumulative incidence of SL ART treatment failure through clinical, immunological or virological criteria at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months of second line ART initiation for a cohort of patients enrolled from March 2009 to January 2016 in Epworth poly-clinic. This is a retrospective cohort study of patients on second line ART in Epworth poly-clinic enrolled since 2009. We describe baseline characteristics and outcomes of treatment using descriptive analysis. Multivariate cox proportional hazard modeling is used to model predictors of time to treatment failure. Kaplan–Meier curve is used to calculate cumulative incidence of treatment failure at 6, 12, 24 and 36 months of second line ART initiation. The study is expected to be finished and communicated to relevant stakeholders in December 2016. The report will be published on peer reviewed journals in January 2017. All the costs needed for this study will be covered by MSF OCA.
    • Retrospective mortality and baseline health survey in Palorinya settlement camp, Uganda

      Siddiqui, M Ruby; Cramond, Vanessa; Goldberg, Jacob; Guzek, John; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      2. OBJECTIVES 2.1. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the scale of the emergency through measurement of crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age 2.2. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES  To estimate the size of the population in Palorinya settlement camp  To describe the population in terms of age, sex and household composition;  To determine the coverage of measles, polio, MenAfriVac, DPT-Hib-HepB (Pentavalent) and pneumococcal virus (PCV) vaccination in 6-59 month olds;  To determine the rate of severe and global acute malnutrition in 6-59 month olds;  To identify the most prevalent morbidities in the population in the two weeks preceding the survey;  To describe the health seeking behaviour in terms of access to primary and secondary care;  To estimate crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age before and after the SPLA advance into Equatoria, South Sudan;  To identify major causes of death, by age group and sex;  To gain knowledge of violence-related events  To determine the coverage of Long-Lasting Insecticide Treated bedNets (LLITNs)
    • Retrospective mortality and baseline health survey in Ofua village, Rhino settlement camp, Uganda

      Siddiqui, M Ruby; Cramond, Vanessa; Barre, Ibrahim; Johnson, Derek; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      OBJECTIVES 2.1. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES To estimate the scale of the emergency through measurement of crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age 2.2. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES  To estimate the size of the population in Rhino (Ofua) settlement camp  To describe the population in terms of age, sex and household composition;  To determine the coverage of measles, polio, MenAfriVac, DPT-Hib-HepB (Pentavalent) and pneumococcal virus (PCV) vaccination in 6-59 month olds;  To determine the rate of severe and global acute malnutrition in 6-59 month olds;  To identify the most prevalent morbidities in the population in the two weeks preceding the survey;  To describe the health seeking behaviour in terms of access to primary and secondary care;  To estimate crude mortality rate for the total population and for children under five years of age before and after the SPLA advance into Equatoria, South Sudan;  To identify major causes of death, by age group and sex;  To gain knowledge of violence-related events  To determine the coverage of Long-Lasting Insecticide Treated bedNets (LLITNs)
    • Case-study: A retrospective assessment of transmission of Ebola virus disease (EVD) through a rural Sierra Leonean community and the impact on mortality and health seeking behaviours.

      Duncombe, Jennifer; Caleo, Grazia; Mills, Clair; Passmore, Charlotte; Kremer, Ronald; Lokuge, Kamalini; Greig, Jane; Lamin, Manjo; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      OBJECTIVES 2.1. PRIMARY OBJECTIVES  To provide a comprehensive description of mortality and transmission of EVD and the community response to EVD in one rural Sierra Leonean community in Kailahun District throughout the course of an outbreak. 2.2. SECONDARY OBJECTIVES 1. Describe the transmission and associated morbidity and mortality of EVD within the village throughout the course of the outbreak, with particular attention to the period prior to the MSF Ebola Management Centre (EMC) opening in Kailahun district (May-June 2014) and the period during which it was receiving cases from the village under study (July-November 2014). 2. Estimate overall and cause-specific mortality (EVD and non-EVD) in under-5 and 5 and older populations within the study village 3. Estimate the secondary cases due to Ebola in quarantined and non-quarantined households. 4. Document the broader impact of the Ebola virus outbreak on health-seeking behaviours and disease outcomes in general, including changes in access to healthcare, illness beliefs and perceptions of healthcare providers. 5. Determine level and factors associated with access and uptake of MSF EMC services within affected households.
    • Effectiveness and safety of 20+ months treatment regimen for Multidrug Resistant Tuberculosis in Manzini Region, Swaziland

      Verdecchia, Maria; MSF-OCA (2018-07)
      Objectives Primary:  To describe outcomes of all patients started on the national MDR-TB treatment protocol in Matsapha & Mankayane by the MSF Manzini Project, Swaziland since its inception in 2011. Secondary:  To identify any difference in outcomes between HIV-co-infected and non-co-infected MDR-TB patients.  To identify risk factors associated with poor outcomes (loss to follow up, treatment failure and death).  To evaluate time to culture conversion.  To evaluate time to poor outcomes (loss to follow up, treatment failure and death).