• Association of blood lead level with neurological features in 972 children affected by an acute severe lead poisoning outbreak in zamfara state, northern Nigeria.

      Greig, J; Thurtle, N; Cooney, L; Ariti, C; Ahmed, A O; Ashagre, T; Ayela, A; Chukwumalu, K; Criado-Perez, A; Gómez-Restrepo, C; et al. (2014-04-16)
      In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) investigated reports of high mortality in young children in Zamfara State, Nigeria, leading to confirmation of villages with widespread acute severe lead poisoning. In a retrospective analysis, we aimed to determine venous blood lead level (VBLL) thresholds and risk factors for encephalopathy using MSF programmatic data from the first year of the outbreak response.
    • Description of 3,180 Courses of Chelation with Dimercaptosuccinic Acid in Children ≤5 y with Severe Lead Poisoning in Zamfara, Northern Nigeria: A Retrospective Analysis of Programme Data

      Thurtle, N; Greig, J; Cooney, L; Amitai, Y; Ariti, C; Brown, M J; Kosnett, M J; Moussally, K; Sani-Gwarzo, N; Akpan, H; et al. (Public Library of Science, 2014-10-07)
      In 2010, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) discovered extensive lead poisoning impacting several thousand children in rural northern Nigeria. An estimated 400 fatalities had occurred over 3 mo. The US Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) confirmed widespread contamination from lead-rich ore being processed for gold, and environmental management was begun. MSF commenced a medical management programme that included treatment with the oral chelating agent 2,3-dimercaptosuccinic acid (DMSA, succimer). Here we describe and evaluate the changes in venous blood lead level (VBLL) associated with DMSA treatment in the largest cohort of children ≤5 y of age with severe paediatric lead intoxication reported to date to our knowledge.