• Caesarean Sections in Rural Burundi: How Well Are Mothers Doing Two Years On?

      van den Boogaard, W; Manzi, M; De Plecker, E; Caluwaerts, S; Nanan-N'zeth, K; Duchenne, B; Etienne, W; Juma, N; Ndelema, B; Zachariah, R (International Union Against TB and Lung Disease, 2016-06-21)
      A caesarean section (C-section) is a life-saving emergency intervention. Avoiding pregnancies for at least 24 months after a C-section is important to prevent uterine rupture and maternal death.
    • Characteristics, medical management and outcomes of survivors of sexual gender-based violence, Nairobi, Kenya

      Buard, V; Van den Bergh, R; Tayler-Smith, K; Godia, P; Sobry, A; Kosgei, R J; Szumilin, E; Harries, A D; Pujades-Rodriguez, M (Public Health Action, 2013-06-21)
    • Cohort analysis of antenatal care and delivery outcomes in pregnancy: a basis for improving maternal health

      Harries, A D; Jahn, A; Ben-Smith, A; Gadabu, O J; Douglas, G P; Seita, A; Khader, A; Zachariah, R (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2014-06-21)
    • Do non-monetary incentives for pregnant women increase antenatal attendance among Ethiopian pastoralists?

      Khogali, M; Zachariah, R; Reid, A J; Alipon, S C; Zimble, S; Gbane, M; Etienne, W; Veerman, R; Hassan, A; Harries, A D (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2014-03)
      In a pastoralist setting in Ethiopia, we assessed changes in attendance between the first and subsequent antenatal care (ANC) visits following the implementation of non-monetary incentives in a primary health care centre over a 3-year period from October 2009 to September 2012. Incentives included the provision of a bar of soap,a bucket, a mosquito net, sugar, cooking oil, a jerrycan and a delivery kit. The first ANC visits increased by 48% in the first year to 60% in the second. Subsequent visits did not show a similar pattern due to ruptures in incentive stocks. Incentives appear to increase ANC attendance; however, ruptures in stock should be avoided to sustain the effect.
    • Does the presence of conflict affect maternal and neonatal mortality during Caesarean sections?

      Gil Cuesta, J; Trelles, M; Naseer, A; Momin, A; Ngabo Mulamira, L; Caluwaerts, S; Guha-Sapir, D (International Union Against Tuberculosis and Lung Disease, 2019-09-21)
      Introduction: Conflicts frequently occur in countries with high maternal and neonatal mortality and can aggravate difficulties accessing emergency care. No literature is available on whether the presence of conflict influences the outcomes of mothers and neonates during Caesarean sections (C-sections) in high-mortality settings. Objective: To determine whether the presence of conflict was associated with changes in maternal and neonatal mortality during C-sections. Methods: We analysed routinely collected data on C-sections from 17 Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) health facilities in 12 countries. Exposure variables included presence and intensity of conflict, type of health facility and other types of access to emergency care. Results: During 2008–2015, 30,921 C-sections were performed in MSF facilities; of which 55.4% were in areas of conflict. No differences were observed in maternal mortality in conflict settings (0.1%) vs. non-conflict settings (0.1%) (P = 0.08), nor in neonatal mortality between conflict (12.2%) and non-conflict settings (11.5%) (P = 0.1). Among the C-sections carried out in conflict settings, neonatal mortality was slightly higher in war zones compared to areas of minor conflict (P = 0.02); there was no difference in maternal mortality (P = 0.38). Conclusions: Maternal and neonatal mortality did not appear to be affected by the presence of conflict in a large number of MSF facilities. This finding should encourage humanitarian organisations to support C-sections in conflict settings to ensure access to quality maternity care.
    • High loss to follow-up following obstetric fistula repair surgery in rural Burundi: is there a way forward?

      Bishinga, A; Zachariah, R; Hinderaker, S; Tayler-Smith, K; Khogali, M; van Griensven, J; van den Boogaard, W; Tamura, M; Christiaens, B; Sinabajije, G (Public Health Action, 2013-06-21)
    • Prevalence of anaemia, syphilis and hepatitis B in pregnant women in Nausori, Fiji

      Tuinakelo, L R; Tayler-Smith, K; Khogali, M; Marks, G B (Public Health Action, 2013-03)
    • Severe acute maternal morbidity and associated deaths in conflict and post-conflict settings in Africa

      Tamura, M; Hinderaker, S G; Manzi, M; Van Den Bergh, R; Zachariah, R (TB Union, 2012-12)