• Factors associated with severe preeclampsia and eclampsia in Jahun, Nigeria

      Guerrier, G; Oluyide, B; Keramarou, M; Grais, R (DovePress, 2013)
      To explore traditional herbal medicines as potential risk factors of severe preeclampsia and eclampsia in Nigeria.
    • Factors Related to Fetal Death in Pregnant Women with Cholera, Haiti, 2011-2014

      Schillberg, E; Ariti, C; Bryson, L; Delva-Senat, R; Price, D; GrandPierre, R; Lenglet, A (Center for Disease Control, 2016-01-01)
      We assessed risk factors for fetal death during cholera infection and effect of treatment changes on these deaths. Third trimester gestation, younger maternal age, severe dehydration, and vomiting were risk factors. Changes in treatment had limited effects on fetal death, highlighting the need for prevention and evidence-based treatment.
    • Female Genital Schistosomiasis and HIV: Research Urgently Needed to Improve Understanding of the Health Impacts of This Important Coinfection.

      O'Brien, DP; Ford, Nathan; Djirmay, AG; Calmy, A; Vitoria, M; Jensen, TO; Christinet, V (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2019-04-15)
      Evidence suggests that there are important interactions between HIV and female genital schistosomiasis (FGS) that may have significant effects on individual and population health. However, the exact way they interact and the health impacts of the interactions are not well understood. In this article, we discuss what is known about the interactions between FGS and HIV, and the potential impact of the interactions. This includes the likelihood that FGS is an important health problem for HIV-positive women in Schistosoma-endemic areas potentially associated with an increased risk of mortality, cancer, and infertility. In addition, it may be significantly impacting the HIV epidemic in sub-Saharan Africa by making young women more susceptible to HIV. We call for immediate action and argue that research is urgently required to address these knowledge gaps and propose a research agenda to achieve this.
    • Good clinical outcomes from a seven years holistic program of fistula repair in Guinea

      Delamou, A; Diallo, M; Beavogui, A H; Delvaux, T; Millimono, S; Kourouma, M; Beattie, K; Barone, M; Barry, T H; Khogali, M; Edginton, M; Hinderaker, S G; Zhang, W-H; De Brouwere, V (Wiley-Blackwell, 2015-02-23)
      Female genital fistula remains a public health concern in developing countries. From January 2007 to September 2013, the Fistula Care project, managed by EngenderHealth in partnership with the Ministry of Health, and supported by USAID, integrated fistula repair services in the maternity wards of general hospitals in Guinea. The objective of this article is to present and discuss the clinical outcomes of 7 years of work involving 2116 women repaired in three hospitals across the country.
    • High loss to follow-up following obstetric fistula repair surgery in rural Burundi: is there a way forward?

      Bishinga, A; Zachariah, R; Hinderaker, S; Tayler-Smith, K; Khogali, M; van Griensven, J; van den Boogaard, W; Tamura, M; Christiaens, B; Sinabajije, G (Public Health Action, 2013-06-21)
    • High maternal and neonatal mortality rates in northern Nigeria: an 8-month observational study

      Guerrier, G; Oluyide, B; Keramarou, M; Grais, R (DovePress, 2013-08)
      Despite considerable efforts to reduce the maternal mortality ratio, numerous pregnant women continue to die in many developing countries, including Nigeria. We conducted a study to determine the incidence and causes of maternal mortality over an 8-month period in a rural-based secondary health facility located in Jahun, northern Nigeria.
    • High prevalence of ESBL-positive bacteria in an obstetrics emergency hospital and neonatal care unit—Haiti, 2016

      Chaintarli, K; Lenglet, A; Beauzile, BD; Senat-Delva, R; Mabou, MM; Martino, C; Berthet, M; Wong, S; Hopman, J (The Society for Healthcare Epidemiology of America, 2018-08-30)
      Patient colonization with extended-spectrum β-lactamase–producing gram-negative bacteria (ESBL-GNB) could serve as a potential reservoir for transmission of multidrug-resistant (MDR) bacteria in a hospital setting. Individuals colonized with ESBLEnterobacteriaceae are also known to be at a higher risk of ESBLGNB infection following their colonization.1 We encountered an outbreak of MDR Klebsiella pneumoniae in the neonatal care unit (NCU) of the Médecins Sans Frontiéres (MSF) obstetric emergency hospital in Port au Prince (CRUO), Haiti, between 2014 and 2015.2 As part of ongoing surveillance activities for MDR bacteria and in an effort to better target infection, prevention, and control (IPC) measures throughout the hospital, we conducted a point-prevalence survey to estimate the prevalence of colonization with ESBL-GNB and to identify risk factors for colonization with ESBL-GNB in women and neonates admitted to this hospital.
    • HPV infection, cervical abnormalities, and cancer in HIV-infected women in Mumbai, India: 12-month follow-up.

      Isaakidis, P; Pimple, S; Varghese, B; Khan, S; Mansoor, H; Ladomirska, J; Sharma, N; Silva, E D; Metcalf, C; Caluwaerts, S; Alders, P; Ntzani, E E; Reid, T; Médecins sans Frontières, Mumbai, India ; Clinical and Molecular Epidemiology Unit, Department of Hygiene and Epidemiology, University of Ioannina School of Medicine, Ioannina, Greece. (2013-08-13)
      HIV-infected women are at a higher risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) and cancer than women in the general population, partly due to a high prevalence of persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. The aim of the study was to assess the burden of HPV infection, cervical abnormalities, and cervical cancer among a cohort of HIV-infected women as part of a routine screening in an urban overpopulated slum setting in Mumbai, India.
    • Improving Men's Participation in Preventing Mother-to-Child Transmission of HIV as a Maternal, Neonatal, and Child Health Priority in South Africa

      van den Berg, W; Brittain, K; Mercer, G; Peacock, D; Stinson, K; Janson, H; Dubula, V (Public Library of Science, 2015-04-07)
      Wessel van den Berg and colleagues outline how increasing male partner involvement in efforts to reduce mother-to-child HIV transmission in South Africa may improve maternal and infant outcomes.
    • Indirect causes of maternal death

      Schulte-Hillen, C; Cabrol, J-C (Elsevier, 2014-10)
    • Keeping it simple: a gender-specific sanitation tool for emergencies

      de Lange, R; Lenglet, A; Francois Fesselet, J; Gartley, M; Altyev, A; Fisher, J; Shanks, L (Practical Action Publishing, 2014-01)
    • Knowledge Translation in Africa for 21(st) Century Integrative Biology: The "Know-Do Gap" in Family Planning with Contraceptive Use among Somali Women

      Ahmed, A A; Mohamed, A A; Guled, I A; Elamin, H M; Abou-Zeid, A H (Mary Ann Liebert, Inc., 2014-10-21)
      Abstract An emerging dimension of 21(st) century integrative biology is knowledge translation in global health. The maternal mortality rate in Somalia is amongst the highest in the world. We set out to study the "know-do" gap in family planning measures in Somalia, with a view to inform future interventions for knowledge integration between theory and practice. We interviewed 360 Somali females of reproductive age and compared university-educated females to women with less or no education, using structured interviews, with a validated questionnaire. The mean age of marriage was 18 years, with 4.5 pregnancies per marriage. The mean for the desired family size was 9.3 and 10.5 children for the university-educated group and the less-educated group, respectively. Importantly, nearly 90% of the university-educated group knew about family planning, compared to 45.6% of the less-educated group. All of the less-educated group indicated that they would never use contraceptives, as compared to 43.5% of the university-educated group. Prevalence of contraceptive use among ever-married women was 4.3%. In the less-educated group, 80.6% indicated that they would not recommend contraceptives to other women as compared to 66.0% of the university-educated group. There is a huge gap between knowledge and practice regarding family planning in Somalia. The attendant reasons for this gap, such as level of education, expressed personal religious beliefs and others, are examined here. For primary health care to gain traction in Africa, we need to address the existing "know-do" gaps that are endemic and adversely impacting on global health. This is the first independent research study examining the knowledge gaps for family planning in Somalia in the last 20 years, with a view to understanding knowledge integration in a global world. The results shall guide policy makers, donors, and implementers to develop a sound family planning policy and program to improve maternal and child health in 21(st) century primary healthcare.
    • A Live Term Intra-Abdominal Pregnancy in a Field Hospital: a Case Report

      Abdelrahman, S; Deeter, M; Muthusami, A; Peterson, TG; Wackenier, L (Oxford University Press, 2017-03-22)
      Abdominal pregnancy is a rare form of ectopic pregnancy with high morbidity and mortality for both the mother and the fetus. Diagnosis can be challenging, especially in a resource-limited setting. We report a case of abdominal pregnancy that presented to Médecins Sans Frontières field hospital in Agok, South Sudan, with abdominal pain. Examination revealed a term pregnancy and a live fetus in transverse lie. The diagnosis of abdominal pregnancy was made intraoperatively, with successful management and delivery of a healthy baby.
    • Local health workers' perceptions of Substandard Care in the Management of Obstetric Hemorrhage in rural Malawi

      Beltman, J J; van den Akker, T; Bwirire, D; Korevaar, A; Chidakwani, R; van Lonkhuijzen, L; van Roosmalen, J; Thyolo District Health Office, Ministry of Health, Thyolo, Malawi. j.j.beltman@lumc.nl. (2013-02-15)
      ABSTRACT:
    • Management of pregnant women infected with Ebola virus in a treatment centre in Guinea, June 2014

      Baggi, F M; Taybi, A; Kurth, A; Van Herp, M; Di Caro, A; Wolfel, R; Gunther, S; Decroo, T; Declerck, H; Jonckheere, S (European Centre for Disease Prevention and Control, 2014-12-11)
    • Obstetric Fistula in Burundi: a comprehensive approach to managing women with this neglected disease

      Tayler-Smith, K; Zachariah, R; Manzi, M; van den Boogaard, W; Vandeborne, A; Bishinga, A; De Plecker, E; Lambert, V; Christiaens, B; Sinabajije, G; Trelles, M; Goetghebuer, S; Reid, T; Harries, A D (BioMed Central Ltd, 2013-08-21)
      In Burundi, the annual incidence of obstetric fistula is estimated to be 0.2-0.5% of all deliveries, with 1000--2000 new cases per year. Despite this relatively high incidence, national capacity for identifying and managing obstetric fistula is very limited. Thus, in July 2010, Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) set up a specialised Obstetric Fistula Centre in Gitega (Gitega Fistula Centre, GFC), the only permanent referral centre for obstetric fistula in Burundi. A comprehensive model of care is offered including psychosocial support, conservative and surgical management, post-operative care and follow-up. We describe this model of care, patient outcomes and the operational challenges.
    • An obstetrician reborn

      Garry, R; Médecins Sans Frontières, Sydney, NSW, Australia. raygarry@btinternet.com (2013-07)
    • One Size Fits All? Standardised Provision of Care for Survivors of Sexual Violence in Conflict and Post-Conflict Areas in the Democratic Republic of Congo

      Loko Roka, J; Van den Bergh, R; Au, S; De Plecker, E; Zachariah, R; Manzi, M; Lambert, V; Abi-Aad, E; Nanan-N'Zeth, K; Nzuya, S; Omba, B; Shako, C; MuishaBaroki, D; Basimuoneye, J P; Moke, D A; Lampaert, E; Masangu, L; De Weggheleire, A (Public Library of Science, 2014-10-20)
      Outcomes of sexual violence care programmes may vary according to the profile of survivors, type of violence suffered, and local context. Analysis of existing sexual violence care services could lead to their better adaptation to the local contexts. We therefore set out to compare the Médecins Sans Frontières sexual violence programmes in the Democratic Republic of Congo (DRC) in a zone of conflict (Masisi, North Kivu) and post-conflict (Niangara, Haut-Uélé).
    • Peripartum infections and associated maternal mortality in rural Malawi

      van den Akker, T; de Vroome, S; Mwagomba, B; Ford, N; van Roosmalen, J; Thyolo District Health Office, Ministry of Health, Thyolo, Malawi; Medecins Sans Frontieres Operational Center Brussels, Brussels, Belgium; The Department of Medical Humanities, EMGO Institute for Health and Care Research, VU University Medical Center, Amsterdam, The Netherlands; The Department of Obstetrics, Leiden University Medical Center, Leiden, The Netherlands; Center for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-08)
      To assess associations between maternal mortality and severe morbidity and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection, uptake of antiretroviral therapy, obstetric infections, and nonobstetric infections in a rural Malawian district, where the estimated HIV prevalence is 21%.