• Association between admission criteria and body composition among young children with moderate acute malnutrition, a cross-sectional study from Burkina Faso.

      Fabiansen, C; Cichon, B; Yameogo, CW; Iuel-Brockdorf, A-S; Phelan, K; Wells, JC; Ritz, C; Filteau, S; Briend, A; Christensen, VB; et al. (Springer Nature, 2020-08-06)
      Children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) are treated based on low weight-for-length z-score (WLZ), low mid-upper arm circumference (MUAC) or both. This study aimed to assess associations of admission criteria and body composition (BC), to improve treatment of MAM. We undertook a cross-sectional study among 6-23 months old Burkinabe children with MAM. Fat-free (FFM) and fat mass (FM) were determined by deuterium dilution and expressed as FFM (FFMI) and FM index (FMI). Of 1,489 children, 439 (29.5%) were recruited by low MUAC only (MUAC-O), 734 (49.3%) by low WLZ and low MUAC (WLZ-MUAC) and 316 (21.2%) by low WLZ only (WLZ-O). Thus, 1,173 (78.8%) were recruited by low MUAC, with or without low WLZ (ALL-MUAC). After adjustments, WLZ-O had 89 g (95% confidence interval (CI) 5; 172) lower FFM compared to MUAC-O. Similarly, WLZ-O had 0.89 kg/m2 (95% CI 0.77; 1.01) lower FFMI compared to MUAC-O, whereas there was no difference for FMI. However, boys included by WLZ-O compared to MUAC-O had 0.21 kg/m2 (95% CI 0.05; 0.38) higher FMI. In contrast, girls included by WLZ-O had 0.17 (95% CI 0.01; 0.33) kg/m2 lower FMI compared to MUAC-O (interaction, p = 0.002). We found that different criteria for admission into MAM treatment programmes select children with differences in BC, especially FFMI.
    • The availability of global guidance for the promotion of women’s, newborns’, children’s and adolescents’ health and nutrition in conflicts

      Aboubaker, S; Evers, ES; Kobeissi, L; Francis, L; Najjemba, R; Miller, NP; Wall, S; Martinez, D; Vargas, J; Ashorn, P; et al. (BMJ Publishing Group, 2020-11-01)
      Background Significant global gains in sexual, reproductive, maternal, newborn, child and adolescent health and nutrition (SRMNCAH&N) will be difficult unless conflict settings are adequately addressed. We aimed to determine the amount, scope and quality of publically available guidance documents, to characterise the process by which agencies develop their guidance and to identify gaps in guidance on SRMNCAH&N promotion in conflicts. Methods We identified guidance documents published between 2008 and 2018 through English-language Internet sites of humanitarian response organisations, reviewed them for their scope and assessed their quality with the AGREE II (Appraisal of Guidelines for REsearch and Evaluation II) tool. Additionally, we interviewed 22 key informants on guidance development, dissemination processes, perceived guidance gaps and applicability. Findings We identified 105 conflict-relevant guidance documents from 75 organisations. Of these, nine were specific to conflicts, others were applicable also to other humanitarian settings. Fifteen documents were technical normative guidelines, others were operational guides (67), descriptive documents (21) or advice on legal, human rights or ethics questions (2). Nutrition was the most addressed health topic, followed by communicable diseases and violence. The documents rated high quality in their ‘scope and purpose’ and ‘clarity of presentation’ and low for ‘rigour of development’ and ‘editorial independence’. Key informants reported end user need as the primary driver for guideline development and WHO technical guidelines as their main evidence base. Insufficient local contextualisation, lack of inter-agency coordination and lack of systematic implementation were considered problems in guideline development. Several guidance gaps were noted, including abortion care, newborn care, early child development, mental health, adolescent health beyond sexual and reproductive health and non-communicable diseases. Interpretation Organisations are motivated and actively producing guidance for SRMNCAH&N promotion in humanitarian settings, but few documents address conflicts specifically and there are important guidance gaps. Improved inter-organisation collaboration for guidance on SRMNCAH&N promotion in conflicts and other humanitarian settings is needed.
    • Effectiveness of Food Supplements in Increasing Fat-Free Tissue Accretion in Children with Moderate Acute Malnutrition: A Randomised 2 × 2 × 3 Factorial Trial in Burkina Faso

      Fabiansen, C; Yaméogo, C; Iuel-Brockdorf, A; Cichon, B; Rytter, M; Kurpad, A; Wells, J; Ritz, C; Ashorn, P; Filteau, S; et al. (Public Library of Science, 2017-09-11)
      Children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM) are treated with lipid-based nutrient supplement (LNS) or corn-soy blend (CSB). We assessed the effectiveness of (a) matrix, i.e., LNS or CSB, (b) soy quality, i.e., soy isolate (SI) or dehulled soy (DS), and (c) percentage of total protein from dry skimmed milk, i.e., 0%, 20%, or 50%, in increasing fat-free tissue accretion.
    • Evaluation of the acceptability of improved supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Burkina Faso using a mixed method approach

      Iuel-Brockdorf, A-S; Draebel, T A; Ritz, C; Fabiansen, C; Cichon, B; Brix Christensen, V; Yameogo, C; Oummani, R; Briend, A; Michaelsen, K F; et al. (Elsevier, 2016-01-02)
      The objective of this study was to evaluate, within the context of a randomized controlled trial of product effectiveness, the acceptability of new formulations of six corn-soy blended flours (CSB) and six lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) with different quantities of milk and qualities of soy for the treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Our study included 1546 children aged 6-23 months and involved questionnaires after one month of supplementation home visits and interviews with a sub-sample of 20 trial participants and their caretakers, and nine focus group discussion. All 12 products were well accepted in terms of organoleptic qualities and received good ratings. However, LNS were more appreciated by caretakers and children. Additionally, an effect of soy isolate was detected on child appreciation where products with high milk content also received better ratings. CSB were not consumed as readily; 33.9% (n = 257) of children receiving CSB were reported to have leftovers compared to 17.3% (n = 134) of children receiving LNS (p=<0.001). Both CSB and LNS were referred to as foods with medicinal properties and perceived as beneficial to child health. They were both reported to have high priority in the daily feeding of the child. In conclusion, there were minimal differences in acceptability of the various CSB and LNS formulations, although CSB were less readily consumed and required smaller meal volumes. Since all products were well-accepted, decisions regarding whether the more expensive products should be used for the treatment of MAM will need to be based on their effect on child nutrition, growth and health. Future supplementary feeding programs in similar contexts could furthermore consider introducing supplementary foods as a medical treatment, as this may increase adherence and decrease sharing.