• Acceptability of new formulations of Corn-Soy Blends and Lipid-based Nutrient Supplements in Province du Passoré, Burkina Faso

      Iuel-Brockdorf, A-S; Dræbel, T A; Fabiansen, C; Cichon, B; Christensen, V B; Yameogo, C; Ritz, C; Olsen, M F; Friis, H (Elsevier, 2015-04-23)
      The objective of this study was to evaluate the acceptability of new formulations of six corn-soy blended flours (CSB) and six lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) with different quantities of milk and qualities of soy to be used for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Furthermore, we wanted to explore the acceptability of foods currently used for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition in Burkina Faso to identify possible barriers that could affect the acceptability of the new formulations of supplementary foods. The study was carried out prior to a randomized controlled trial evaluating the effectiveness of these new formulations. The study involved an observed test-meal and a three-day take-home ration of the experimental food supplements to 6-30-months-old healthy children, followed by questionnaire-based interviews about the acceptability of these supplements. Interviews and focus group discussions were carried out to explore the acceptability of foods currently used for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition. The results suggest that both LNS and CSB products with different quantities of milk and qualities of soy are equally well accepted among healthy children in rural Burkina Faso based on general appreciation of the supplements and organoleptic properties. All experimental foods received good ratings and there was no significant difference between the foods. However, after the take-home ration, 58% of participants receiving CSB reported having left-overs at the end of the day compared to 37% (n=33) of the participants receiving LNS (p=0.004), suggesting that CSB was not as readily consumed as LNS. Yet, both CSB and LNS products were perceived as easy to administer and the frequency of feeding was estimated to be adequate. The study also found that similar foods, used for the prevention and treatment of malnutrition, were well appreciated in the study location. LNS were to a higher degree associated with medicine or foods with medicinal properties, but both LNS and CSB were perceived as beneficial to child health.
    • Beyond wasted and stunted—a major shift to fight child undernutrition

      Wells, JCK; Briend, A; Boyd, EM; Berkely, JA; Hall, A; Isanaka, S; Webb, P; Khara, T; Dolan, C (Elsevier, 2019-09-11)
      Child undernutrition refers broadly to the condition in which food intake is inadequate to meet a child's needs for physiological function, growth, and the capacity to respond to illness. Since the 1970s, nutritionists have categorised undernutrition in two major ways, either as wasted (ie, low weight for height, or small mid-upper arm circumference) or stunted (ie, low height for age). This approach, although useful for identifying populations at risk of undernutrition, creates several problems: the focus is on children who have already become undernourished, and this approach draws an artificial distinction between two idealised types of undernourished children that are widely interpreted as indicative of either acute or chronic undernutrition. This distinction in turn has led to the separation of programmatic approaches to prevent and treat child undernutrition. In the past 3 years, research has shown that individual children are at risk of both conditions, might be born with both, pass from one state to the other over time, and accumulate risks to their health and life through their combined effects. The current emphasis on identifying children who are already wasted or stunted detracts attention from the larger number of children undergoing the process of becoming undernourished. We call for a major shift in thinking regarding how we assess child undernutrition, and how prevention and treatment programmes can best address the diverse causes and dynamic biological processes that underlie undernutrition.
    • Development of a cross-over randomized trial method to determine the acceptability and safety of novel ready-to-use therapeutic foods

      Dibari, F; Bahwere, P; Huerga, H; Irena, A H; Owino, V; Collins, S; Seal, A (Elsevier, 2013-01)
      To develop a method for determining the acceptability and safety of ready-to-use therapeutic foods (RUTF) before clinical trialing. Acceptability was defined using a combination of three consumption, nine safety, and six preference criteria. These were used to compare a soy/maize/sorghum RUTF (SMS-RUTFh), designed for the rehabilitation of human immunodeficiency virus/tuberculosis (HIV/TB) wasted adults, with a peanut-butter/milk-powder paste (P-RUTF; brand: Plumpy'nut) designed for pediatric treatment.
    • Evaluation of the acceptability of improved supplementary foods for the treatment of moderate acute malnutrition in Burkina Faso using a mixed method approach

      Iuel-Brockdorf, A-S; Draebel, T A; Ritz, C; Fabiansen, C; Cichon, B; Brix Christensen, V; Yameogo, C; Oummani, R; Briend, A; Michaelsen, K F; et al. (Elsevier, 2016-01-02)
      The objective of this study was to evaluate, within the context of a randomized controlled trial of product effectiveness, the acceptability of new formulations of six corn-soy blended flours (CSB) and six lipid-based nutrient supplements (LNS) with different quantities of milk and qualities of soy for the treatment of children with moderate acute malnutrition (MAM). Our study included 1546 children aged 6-23 months and involved questionnaires after one month of supplementation home visits and interviews with a sub-sample of 20 trial participants and their caretakers, and nine focus group discussion. All 12 products were well accepted in terms of organoleptic qualities and received good ratings. However, LNS were more appreciated by caretakers and children. Additionally, an effect of soy isolate was detected on child appreciation where products with high milk content also received better ratings. CSB were not consumed as readily; 33.9% (n = 257) of children receiving CSB were reported to have leftovers compared to 17.3% (n = 134) of children receiving LNS (p=<0.001). Both CSB and LNS were referred to as foods with medicinal properties and perceived as beneficial to child health. They were both reported to have high priority in the daily feeding of the child. In conclusion, there were minimal differences in acceptability of the various CSB and LNS formulations, although CSB were less readily consumed and required smaller meal volumes. Since all products were well-accepted, decisions regarding whether the more expensive products should be used for the treatment of MAM will need to be based on their effect on child nutrition, growth and health. Future supplementary feeding programs in similar contexts could furthermore consider introducing supplementary foods as a medical treatment, as this may increase adherence and decrease sharing.
    • Severe Malnutrition in Infants displaced from Mosul, Iraq

      Haidar, MK; Farhat, JB; Saim, M; Morton, N; Defourny, I (Elsevier, 2017-12)
    • Slow response to Angola's food crisis.

      Ford, N; Médecins Sans Frontières, 124-32 Clerkenwell Road, London EC1R 5DJ, UK. office@london.msf.org (Elsevier, 2002-07-27)