• Ready-to-use therapeutic food for Catch-up Growth in children after an episode of Plasmodium Falciparum Malaria: an open randomised controlled trial

      van der Kam, S; Swarthout, T; Niragira, O; Froud, A; Sompwe, E M; Mills, C; Roll, S; Tinnemann, P; Shanks, L; Médecins Sans Frontières, Amsterdam, The Netherlands. saskia.vd.kam@amsterdam.msf.org (2012-04-25)
      Catch-up growth after an infection is essential for children to maintain good nutritional status. To prevent malnutrition, WHO recommends that children are given one additional healthy meal per day during the 2 weeks after onset of illness. We investigated to what extent ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF) promotes catch-up growth in children after an acute, uncomplicated episode of Plasmodium falciparum malaria.
    • [Surveillance of the Nutritional Status of the Population in Kinshasa, Zaire (1991-1994)]

      Arbyn, M; Dedeurwaerder, M; Miakala, M; Bikangi, N; Boelaert, M; Médecins sans Frontières, Brussels, Belgium. (1995-06)
      Six anthropometric surveys using a random cluster sampling design have been organised in the capital of Zaire between November 1991 and March 1994. The prevalence of acute malnutrition fluctuated with the seasons and followed the cyclic movements of food prices on the market. The general tendency was rising. In March '94, 10.7% (95% confidence interval: 8.8-12.9%) of the children was suffering of acute malnutrition. Nevertheless, the standardised prevalence remained stable. This may suggest that the most disadvantaged living at certain poor zones of the city disconnected, while the rest of the population could still manage to maintain their nutritional status. The hypothesis of increasing heterogeneity is supported by the raising of the design-effect.