• Feasibility of a mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose oral cholera vaccine in an urban cholera-endemic setting in Mozambique.

      Cavailler, P; Lucas, M; Perroud, V; McChesney, M; Ampuero, S; Guerin, P J; Legros, D; Nierle, T; Mahoudeau, C; Lab, B; et al. (2006-05-29)
      We conducted a study to assess the feasibility and the potential vaccine coverage of a mass vaccination campaign using a two-dose oral cholera vaccine in an urban endemic neighbourhood of Beira, Mozambique. The campaign was conducted from December 2003 to January 2004. Overall 98,152 doses were administered, and vaccine coverage of the target population was 58.6% and 53.6% for the first and second rounds, respectively. The direct cost of the campaign, which excludes the price of the vaccine, amounted to slightly over 90,000 dollars, resulting in the cost per fully vaccinated person of 2.09 dollars, which is relatively high. However, in endemic settings where outbreaks are likely to occur, integrating cholera vaccination into the routine activities of the public health system could reduce such costs.
    • Global oral cholera vaccine use

      Pezzoli, L; Cavailler, P; Mengel, M; Matzger, H; Lorenson, T; Sur, D; Luquero, F; Grais, RF; Ko, M; Soble, A; et al. (Elsevier, 2019-09-10)
      Vaccination is a key intervention to prevent and control cholera in conjunction with water, sanitation and hygiene activities. An oral cholera vaccine (OCV) stockpile was established by the World Health Organization (WHO) in 2013. We reviewed its use from July 2013 to all of 2018 in order to assess its role in cholera control. We computed information related to OCV deployments and campaigns conducted including setting, target population, timelines, delivery strategy, reported adverse events, coverage achieved, and costs. In 2013–2018, a total of 83,509,941 OCV doses have been requested by 24 countries, of which 55,409,160 were approved and 36,066,010 eventually shipped in 83 deployments, resulting in 104 vaccination campaigns in 22 countries. OCVs had in general high uptake (mean administrative coverage 1st dose campaign at 90.3%; 2nd dose campaign at 88.2%; mean survey-estimated two-dose coverage at 69.9%, at least one dose at 84.6%) No serious adverse events were reported. Campaigns were organized quickly (five days median duration). In emergency settings, the longest delay was from the occurrence of the emergency to requesting OCV (median: 26 days). The mean cost of administering one dose of vaccine was 2.98 USD. The OCV stockpile is an important public health resource. OCVs were generally well accepted by the population and their use demonstrated to be safe and feasible in all settings. OCV was an inexpensive intervention, although timing was a limiting factor for emergency use. The dynamic created by the establishment of the OCV stockpile has played a role in the increased use of the vaccine by setting in motion a virtuous cycle by which better monitoring and evaluation leads to better campaign organization, better cholera control, and more requests being generated. Further work is needed to improve timeliness of response and contextualize strategies for OCV delivery in the various settings.
    • Oral cholera vaccination in hard-to-reach communities, Lake Chilwa, Malawi

      Grandesso, F; Rafael, F; Chipeta, S; Alley, I; Saussier, C; Nogareda, F; Burns, M; Lechevalier, P; Page, AL; Salumu, L; et al. (The World Health Organization, 2018-12-01)
      To evaluate vaccination coverage, identify reasons for non-vaccination and assess satisfaction with two innovative strategies for distributing second doses in an oral cholera vaccine campaign in 2016 in Lake Chilwa, Malawi, in response to a cholera outbreak.
    • Oral cholera vaccination in hard-to-reach communities, Lake Chilwa, Malawi

      Grandesso, F; Rafael, F; Chipeta, S; Alley, I; Saussier, C; Nogareda, F; Burns, M; Lechevalier, P; Page, AL; Salumu, L; et al. (World Health Organization, 2018-09-27)
    • Oral cholera vaccine in cholera prevention and control, Malawi

      M'bangombe, M; Pezzoli, L; Reeder, B; Kabuluzi, S; Msyamboza, K; Masuku, H; Ngwira, B; Cavailler, P; Grandesso, F; Palomares, A; et al. (World Health Organization, 2018-06-01)
      With limited global supplies of oral cholera vaccine, countries need to identify priority areas for vaccination while longer-term solutions, such as water and sanitation infrastructure, are being developed.