• A Comparison of Liposomal Amphotericin B with Sodium Stibogluconate for the Treatment of Visceral Leishmaniasis in Pregnancy in Sudan.

      Mueller, M; Balasegaram, M; Koummuki, Y; Ritmeijer, K; Santana, M R; Davidson, R N N; Médecins sans Frontières, 67-74 Saffron Hill, London EC1N 8QX, UK. (Published by Oxford University Press, 2006-10)
      OBJECTIVES: Little is known about the treatment of visceral leishmaniasis (VL) in pregnancy, especially in resource-poor settings. We present a series of pregnant women with VL treated with either sodium stibogluconate or liposomal amphotericin B (AmBisome), or both, in eastern Sudan over 16 months. METHODS: We did a retrospective analysis of all pregnant VL patients treated in the Médecins sans Frontières (MSF) Um el Kher centre between January 2004 and April 2005. We diagnosed VL with laboratory confirmation of clinical suspects, and recorded the outcomes of treatment for pregnant women and their foetuses. We carried out a manual search of relevant publications and a systematic search of the literature in the MEDLINE database. RESULTS: We treated 23 women with sodium stibogluconate, 4 with AmBisome and sodium stibogluconate and 12 with AmBisome alone. There were 13 (57%) spontaneous abortions in the sodium stibogluconate monotherapy group, and none in either of the other two groups. All spontaneous abortions occurred in the first two trimesters. All patients, except one in the sodium stibogluconate group who defaulted, were discharged as cured in good clinical condition. CONCLUSIONS: AmBisome treatment for VL appears to be safe and effective for pregnant women and their foetuses. We recommend the use of AmBisome as first-line treatment for these patients.
    • An Open Source Pharma Roadmap

      Balasegaram, M; Kolb, P; McKew, J; Menon, J; Olliaro, P; Sablinski, T; Thomas, Z; Todd, MH; Torreele, E; Wilbanks, J (Public Library of Science, 2017-04-18)
      In an Essay, Matthew Todd and colleagues discuss an open source approach to drug development.
    • Research & development in the dark: what does it take to make one medicine? And what could it take?

      Reid, J; Balasegaram, M; MSF (2016-08)
      Earlier this year a series of advertisements appeared in London's Westminster tube stations asking viewers to consider a seemingly simple question, 'what does it take to make one medicine?' But as it turns out, this question is not so simple to answer. In this commentary we highlight some key considerations and questions on what it takes to make one medicine, and what it could take to develop medicines that meet people's health needs and are accessible and affordable for all who need them.