• A Medecins Sans Frontieres Ethics Framework for Humanitarian Innovation Plus Worked Case Studies

      Sheather, J; Jobanputra, K; Schopper, D; Pringle, J; Venis, S; Wong, S; Vincent-Smith, R (2016-10)
    • Medicine Is Still a Victim of War: We Desperately Need New Ideas

      Sheather, J; Pérache, A (BMJ Publishing Group, 2017-06-14)
      What we are witnessing is war without restraint. But what do we do to stop it?
    • Medicine Under Fire

      Sheather, J; Hawkins, V (BMJ Publishing Group, 2016-12-14)
    • Medicines without doctors: why the Global Fund must fund salaries of health workers to expand AIDS treatment.

      Ooms, G; Van Damme, W; Temmerman, M; Belgian section of Médecins Sans Frontières, Brussels, Belgium. gorik.ooms@brussels.msf.org (Public Library of Science, 2007-04)
    • Médecins Sans Frontières Experience in the Provision of Health Care in Complex Settings.

      Chan, E; Médecins Sans Frontières Hong Kong, Shop 5B, Laichikok Bay Garden, 272 Lai King Hill Road, Kowloon, Hong Kong. (2003-02)
    • Nagaland health assessment: High mortality rates and difficulty accessing essential health services in Lahe Township, Republic of the Union of Myanmar.

      Johnson, DC; Incerti, A; Thu Swe, K; Gignoux, E; Shwe Sin Ei, WL; Lwin Tun, T; Htun, C (Public Library of Science, 2019-05-14)
      INTRODUCTION: Lahe Township belongs to Myanmar`s Naga Self-administered Zone, which is one of the most remote and mountainous areas in Myanmar. However, the limited health data available for the region suggests that there could be neglected health needs that require attention. The purpose of this study was to assess the health status of the population of Lahe Township. METHODS: A cross-sectional study design incorporating a two-stage cluster sampling methodology recommended by the WHO was used to conduct a household level survey. In the first stage, 30 village clusters were selected from all villages situated in the Lahe Township through systematic sampling with probability of selection proportional to the population size of each village based on the 2014 Myanmar census. In the second stage, a GPS-based sampling method was used to select 30 households within a village cluster. The head of the household completed the survey for all members of the household. Questionnaires inquired about maternal health, mortality, morbidities, childhood nutritional status, access to health care, and water & sanitation. The resulting data was stratified by urban/rural status. RESULTS: Data was collected on 5,929 individuals living in 879 households, of which 993 individuals (16.7%) were children 5 years old or younger. The median age was 18.0 (IQR 8.0-35.0). Children 15 years old or younger represented 44.7% of the population. 19.8% of households reported at least 1 household member sick during the previous 30 days. The crude mortality rate per 10,000 people per day was 0.58 (95% CI: 0.48-0.69). The under 5 mortality per 10,000 people per day was 0.74 (95% CI: 0.50-1.06). Only 46.7% of households could access a hospital if there was a need. CONCLUSION: Our results demonstrate a high rate of mortality and the inability to access healthcare in Lahe Township, which should be addressed to prevent further deterioration of health.
    • Nurses graduating in Fiji between 2001 and 2010: sufficient supply for Fiji's health service demands?

      Aiyub, S.; Linh, N. N.; Tayler-Smith, K.; Khogali, M.; Bissell, K. (2013-03)
    • On Complicity and Compromise: A Précis

      Lepora, C; Goodin, RE (BMJ Publishing Group We regret that this article is behind a paywall., 2017-03-03)
    • On Complicity and Compromise: A Reply

      Lepora, C; Goodin, RE (BMJ Publishing Group, 2016-12-14)
    • An Open Source Pharma Roadmap

      Balasegaram, M; Kolb, P; McKew, J; Menon, J; Olliaro, P; Sablinski, T; Thomas, Z; Todd, MH; Torreele, E; Wilbanks, J (Public Library of Science, 2017-04-18)
      In an Essay, Matthew Todd and colleagues discuss an open source approach to drug development.
    • Operational research in malawi: making a difference with cotrimoxazole preventive therapy in patients with tuberculosis and HIV.

      Harries, Anthony D; Zachariah, Rony; Chimzizi, Rhehab; Salaniponi, Felix; Gausi, Francis; Kanyerere, Henry; Schouten, Erik J; Jahn, Andreas; Makombe, Simon D; Chimbwandira, Frank M; et al. (2011)
      ABSTRACT:
    • Out of (West) Africa-Who Lost in the End?

      Olliaro, Piero; Lasry, Estrella; Tiffany, Amanda (American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2014-12-15)
      On October 29, 2014, 4 days before the annual meeting of the American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene (ASTMH) to be held in New Orleans, LA, meeting registrants received an e-mail letter from the Louisiana Department of Health and Hospitals stating "we have requested that any individuals that will be traveling to Louisiana following a trip to the West African countries of Guinea, Liberia, and Sierra Leone or have had contact with an Ebola-infected individual remain in a self-quarantine for the 21 days following their relevant travel history…we see no use in you traveling to New Orleans to simply be confined to your room." This communication made it clear that those recently in countries experiencing the 2014 Ebola epidemic would not be able to participate in the meeting. The ASTMH sent their own communication stating that the Society did not agree with the State's policy, but had no choice but to abide. However inconvenient and upsetting this decision might have been, what really matters transcends the mere disturbance of long-planned schedules. More broadly, we lost on five levels.
    • Partnerships, Not Parachutists, for Zika Research

      Heymann, DL; Liu, J; Lillywhite, L (Massachusetts Medical Society, 2016-03-09)
    • Patent dispute: Delhi High Court gives a boost to access to affordable medicines

      Menghaney, Leena; Medecins Sans Frontieres-Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, C 236 Defence Colony, New Delhi, India (Forum for Medical Ethics Society, 2010-04-01)
      The Delhi High Court has rejected the petition filed by Bayer Corporation seeking to stop the Drugs Controller of India (DCGI) from registering a generic version of a patented cancer drug. The case was filed in 2008 by Bayer to try and introduce "patent linkage" which involves linking the registration (marketing approval) of drugs with their patent status. If Bayer's plea for "patent linkage" had been accepted by the court, it would have undermined public health safeguards contained in India's patent legislation. This comment discusses the Bayer case in the context of efforts by multinational pharmaceutical companies to introduce barriers to generic competition, the only proven means of reducing the prices of medicines to make them affordable to those in need. Bayer has filed an appeal in the Supreme Court, indicating that it does not intend to give up.
    • Pathway to affordable quality assured sources of pegylated interferon alpha for treating hepatitis C

      Milani, Barbara; Gaspani, Sara (Pro Pharma Communications International, 2014-04-18)
    • A piece of my mind. Educational malpractice.

      Stitham, S; Médecins Sans Frontières, Mission Sri Lanka. (1991-08-21)
    • Pre-emptive war epidemiology: lessons from the Democratic Republic of Congo.

      Depoortere, E; Checchi, F; Epicentre, 75011 Paris, France. evelyn.depoortere@brussels.msf.org (Elsevier, 2006-01-07)
    • Pricing of drugs and donations: options for sustainable equity pricing.

      Pérez-Casas, C; Herranz, E; Ford, N; Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, Médecins sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland. carmen_perez@madrid.msf.org (Wiley-Blackwell, 2001-11)
      Effective medicines exist to treat or alleviate many diseases which predominate in the developing world and cause high mortality and morbidity rates. Price should not be an obstacle preventing access to these medicines. Increasingly, drug donations have been established by drug companies, but these are often limited in time, place or use. Measures exist which are more sustainable and will have a greater positive impact on people's health. Principally, these are encouraging generic competition; adopting into national legislation and implementing TRIPS safeguards to gain access to cheaper sources of drugs; differential pricing; creating high volume or high demand through global and regional procurement; and supporting the production of quality generic drugs by developing countries through voluntary licenses if needed, and facilitating technology transfer.
    • Promotion of access to essential medicines for Non-Communicable Diseases: Practical implications of the UN Political Declaration

      Hogerzeil, Hans V; Liberman, Jonathan; Wirtz, Veronika J; Kishore, Sandeep P; Selvaraj, Sakthi; Kiddell-Monroe, Rachel; Mwangi-Powell, Faith N; von Schoen-Angerer, Tido; Department of Global Health, University of Groningen, University Medical Centre, Groningen, Netherlands. h.v.hogerzeil@umcg.nl (2013-02-12)
      Access to medicines and vaccines to prevent and treat non-communicable diseases (NCDs) is unacceptably low worldwide. In the 2011 UN political declaration on the prevention and control of NCDs, heads of government made several commitments related to access to essential medicines, technologies, and vaccines for such diseases. 30 years of experience with policies for essential medicines and 10 years of scaling up of HIV treatment have provided the knowledge needed to address barriers to long-term effective treatment and prevention of NCDs. More medicines can be acquired within existing budgets with efficient selection, procurement, and use of generic medicines. Furthermore, low-income and middle-income countries need to increase mobilisation of domestic resources to cater for the many patients with NCDs who do not have access to treatment. Existing initiatives for HIV treatment offer useful lessons that can enhance access to pharmaceutical management of NCDs and improve adherence to long-term treatment of chronic illness; policy makers should also address unacceptable inequities in access to controlled opioid analgesics. In addition to off-patent medicines, governments can promote access to new and future on-patent medicinal products through coherent and equitable health and trade policies, particularly those for intellectual property. Frequent conflicts of interest need to be identified and managed, and indicators and targets for access to NCD medicines should be used to monitor progress. Only with these approaches can a difference be made to the lives of hundreds of millions of current and future patients with NCDs.