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dc.contributor.authorBashaye, Seife
dc.contributor.authorNombela, Nohelly
dc.contributor.authorArgaw, Daniel
dc.contributor.authorMulugeta, Abate
dc.contributor.authorHerrero, Merce
dc.contributor.authorNieto, Javier
dc.contributor.authorChicharro, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorCañavate, Carmen
dc.contributor.authorAparicio, Pilar
dc.contributor.authorVélez, Iván Darío
dc.contributor.authorAlvar, Jorge
dc.contributor.authorBern, Caryn
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-29T14:13:39Z
dc.date.available2010-10-29T14:13:39Z
dc.date.issued2009-07-01
dc.identifier.citationAm. J. Trop. Med. Hyg. 2009;81(1):34-9en
dc.identifier.issn1476-1645
dc.identifier.pmid19556563
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/114073
dc.description.abstractWe conducted a case-control study to evaluate risk factors for visceral leishmaniasis during an epidemic in a previously unaffected district of Ethiopia. We also collected blood and bone marrow specimens from dogs in the outbreak villages. In multivariable analyses of 171 matched case-control pairs, dog ownership, sleeping under an acacia tree during the day, and habitually sleeping outside at night were associated with significantly increased risk. Specimens from 7 (3.8%) dogs were positive by immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), whereas Leishmania DNA was detected in 5 (2.8%) bone marrow aspirates (from 3 seropositive and 2 seronegative dogs). Insecticide-treated nets may only protect a portion of those at risk. Further research on the vectors, the role of the dog in the transmission cycle, and the effect of candidate interventions are needed to design the best strategy for control.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.ajtmh.org/cgi/content/full/81/1/34en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to The American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
dc.subject.meshAdolescenten
dc.subject.meshAdulten
dc.subject.meshAgeden
dc.subject.meshAnimalsen
dc.subject.meshCase-Control Studiesen
dc.subject.meshChilden
dc.subject.meshChild, Preschoolen
dc.subject.meshDog Diseasesen
dc.subject.meshDogsen
dc.subject.meshEthiopiaen
dc.subject.meshFemaleen
dc.subject.meshHumansen
dc.subject.meshInfanten
dc.subject.meshLeishmaniasis, Visceralen
dc.subject.meshLogistic Modelsen
dc.subject.meshMaleen
dc.subject.meshMiddle Ageden
dc.subject.meshMultivariate Analysisen
dc.subject.meshRisk Factorsen
dc.titleRisk factors for visceral leishmaniasis in a new epidemic site in Amhara Region, Ethiopiaen
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentMalaria & Other Vector Borne Diseases, Prevention and Control Program, Ministry of Health, Addis Ababa, Ethiopia; Department for the Control of Neglected Tropical Diseases (HTM/NTD/IDM), Leishmaniasis Control Program, World Health Organization, Geneva, Switzerland; Disease Prevention and Control Programmes, World Health Organization, Ethiopia; Médecins sans Frontières, Greece, Ethiopia; WHO Collaborating Center for Leishmaniasis, National Center of Microbiology, Instituto de Salud Carlos III, Madrid, Spain; Universidad de Antioquia, Medellin, Colombia; Division of Parasitic Diseases, National Center for Zoonotic, Vector-Borne and Enteric Diseases, Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, Atlanta, Georgiaen
dc.identifier.journalThe American Journal of Tropical Medicine and Hygieneen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T08:23:56Z
html.description.abstractWe conducted a case-control study to evaluate risk factors for visceral leishmaniasis during an epidemic in a previously unaffected district of Ethiopia. We also collected blood and bone marrow specimens from dogs in the outbreak villages. In multivariable analyses of 171 matched case-control pairs, dog ownership, sleeping under an acacia tree during the day, and habitually sleeping outside at night were associated with significantly increased risk. Specimens from 7 (3.8%) dogs were positive by immunofluorescent antibody test (IFAT) and both enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs), whereas Leishmania DNA was detected in 5 (2.8%) bone marrow aspirates (from 3 seropositive and 2 seronegative dogs). Insecticide-treated nets may only protect a portion of those at risk. Further research on the vectors, the role of the dog in the transmission cycle, and the effect of candidate interventions are needed to design the best strategy for control.


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