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dc.contributor.authorShimakawa, Yen
dc.contributor.authorCamélique, Oen
dc.contributor.authorAriyoshi, Ken
dc.date.accessioned2010-10-29T14:16:40Z
dc.date.available2010-10-29T14:16:40Z
dc.date.issued2010-02-22
dc.date.submitted2010-10-14
dc.identifier.citationConfl Health 2010;4:4en
dc.identifier.issn1752-1505
dc.identifier.pmid20175899
dc.identifier.doi10.1186/1752-1505-4-4
dc.identifier.urihttp://hdl.handle.net/10144/114099
dc.description.abstractAlthough chickenpox is a generally mild, self-limited illness of children, it can cause fatal disease in adults. Accumulating reports from tropical countries showed a high prevalence of seronegativity among the adults, implying that varicella diseases could become a heavy burden in tropical countries. However, in the situation of humanitarian emergencies in tropical areas, chickenpox has largely been ignored as a serious communicable disease, due to lack of data regarding varicella mortality and hospital admissions in such a context. This is the first report describing an outbreak of chickenpox in a refugee camp of tropical region. In 2008, we experienced a varicella outbreak in ethnic Lao Hmong refugee camp in Phetchabun Province, northern Thailand. The attack rate was 4.0% (309/7,815) and this caused 3 hospitalizations including one who developed severe varicella pneumonia with respiratory failure. All hospitalizations were exclusively seen in adults, and the proportion of patients > or = 15 years old was 13.6% (42/309). Because less exposure to varicella-zoster virus due to low population density has previously been suggested to be one of the reasons behind higher prevalence of susceptible adults in tropics, the influx of displaced people from rural areas to a densely populated asylum might result in many severe adult cases once a varicella outbreak occurs. Control interventions such as vaccination should be considered even in refugee camp, if the confluence of the risk factors present in this situation.
dc.language.isoenen
dc.relation.urlhttp://www.conflictandhealth.com/content/4/1/4en
dc.rightsArchived with thanks to Conflict and Healthen
dc.subject.meshVaricellaen
dc.subject.meshRefugeeen
dc.titleOutbreak of chickenpox in a refugee camp of northern Thailanden
dc.typeArticleen
dc.contributor.departmentgCOE program, Institute of Tropical Medicine (Nekken), Nagasaki University, Sakamoto, Nagasaki-shi, Japan; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, Franceen
dc.identifier.journalConflict and Healthen
refterms.dateFOA2019-03-04T08:24:02Z
html.description.abstractAlthough chickenpox is a generally mild, self-limited illness of children, it can cause fatal disease in adults. Accumulating reports from tropical countries showed a high prevalence of seronegativity among the adults, implying that varicella diseases could become a heavy burden in tropical countries. However, in the situation of humanitarian emergencies in tropical areas, chickenpox has largely been ignored as a serious communicable disease, due to lack of data regarding varicella mortality and hospital admissions in such a context. This is the first report describing an outbreak of chickenpox in a refugee camp of tropical region. In 2008, we experienced a varicella outbreak in ethnic Lao Hmong refugee camp in Phetchabun Province, northern Thailand. The attack rate was 4.0% (309/7,815) and this caused 3 hospitalizations including one who developed severe varicella pneumonia with respiratory failure. All hospitalizations were exclusively seen in adults, and the proportion of patients > or = 15 years old was 13.6% (42/309). Because less exposure to varicella-zoster virus due to low population density has previously been suggested to be one of the reasons behind higher prevalence of susceptible adults in tropics, the influx of displaced people from rural areas to a densely populated asylum might result in many severe adult cases once a varicella outbreak occurs. Control interventions such as vaccination should be considered even in refugee camp, if the confluence of the risk factors present in this situation.


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