• Lamivudine monotherapy as a holding regimen for HIV-positive children.

      Patten, G; Bernheimer, J; Fairlie, L; Rabie, H; Sawry, S; Technau, K; Eley, B; Davies, MA (Public Library of Science, 2018-10-11)
      BACKGROUND: In resource-limited settings holding regimens, such as lamivudine monotherapy (LM), are used to manage HIV-positive children failing combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to mitigate the risk of drug resistance developing, whilst adherence barriers are addressed or when access to second- or third-line regimens is restricted. We aimed to investigate characteristics of children placed on LM and their outcomes. METHODS: We describe the characteristics of children (age <16 years at cART start) from 5 IeDEA-SA cohorts with a record of LM during their treatment history. Among those on LM for >90 days we describe their immunologic outcomes on LM and their immunologic and virologic outcomes after resuming cART. FINDINGS: We included 228 children in our study. At LM start their median age was 12.0 years (IQR 7.3-14.6), duration on cART was 3.6 years (IQR 2.0-5.9) and median CD4 count was 605.5 cells/μL (IQR 427-901). Whilst 110 (48%) had no prior protease inhibitor (PI)-exposure, of the 69 with recorded PI-exposure, 9 (13%) patients had documented resistance to all PIs. After 6 months on LM, 70% (94/135) experienced a drop in CD4, with a predicted average CD4 decline of 46.5 cells/μL (95% CI 37.7-55.4). Whilst on LM, 46% experienced a drop in CD4 to <500 cells/μL, 18 (8%) experienced WHO stage 3 or 4 events, and 3 children died. On resumption of cART the average gain in CD4 was 15.65 cells/uL per month and 66.6% (95% CI 59.3-73.7) achieved viral suppression (viral load <1000) at 6 months after resuming cART. INTERPRETATION: Most patients experienced immune decline on LM. Its use should be avoided in those with low CD4 counts, but restricted use may be necessary when treatment options are limited. Managing children with virologic failure will continue to be challenging until more treatment options and better adherence strategies are available.
    • The Last and First Frontier--Emerging Challenges for HIV Treatment and Prevention in the First week of Life With Emphasis on Premature and Low Birth Weight Infants

      Cotton, MF; Holgate, S; Nelson, A; Rabie, H; Wedderburn, C; Mirochnick, M (International AIDS Society, 2015-12-02)
      There is new emphasis on identifying and treating HIV in the first days of life and also an appreciation that low birth weight (LBW) and preterm delivery (PTD) frequently accompany HIV-related pregnancy. Even in the absence of HIV, PTD and LBW contribute substantially to neonatal and infant mortality. HIV-exposed and -infected infants with these characteristics have received little attention thus far. As HIV programs expand to meet the 90-90-90 target for ending the HIV pandemic, attention should focus on newborn infants, including those delivered preterm or of LBW.
    • Viral Load Versus CD4⁺ Monitoring and 5-Year Outcomes of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Children in Southern Africa: a Cohort-Based Modelling Study

      Salazar-Vizcaya, L; Keiser, O; Karl, T; Davies, MA; Haas, Andreas D; Blaser, N; Cox, V; Eley, B; Rabie, H; Moultrie, H; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-10-23)
      Many paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in Southern Africa rely on CD4⁺ to monitor ART. We assessed the benefit of replacing CD4⁺ by viral load monitoring.
    • Where do HIV-infected adolescents go after transfer? - Tracking transition/transfer of HIV-infected adolescents using linkage of cohort data to a health information system platform

      Davies, MA; Tsondai, P; Tiffin, N; Eley, B; Rabie, H; Euvrard, J; Orrell, C; Prozesky, H; Wood, R; Cogill, D; et al. (Wiley, 2017-03-16)
      To evaluate long-term outcomes in HIV-infected adolescents, it is important to identify ways of tracking outcomes after transfer to a different health facility. The Department of Health (DoH) in the Western Cape Province (WCP) of South Africa uses a single unique identifier for all patients across the health service platform. We examined adolescent outcomes after transfer by linking data from four International epidemiology Databases to Evaluate AIDS Southern Africa (IeDEA-SA) cohorts in the WCP with DoH data.