• Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients enrolled in a comprehensive care program in Cambodia: a 24-month follow-up assessment

      Spire, Bruno; Carrieri, Patrizia; Sopha, Pal; Protopopescu, Camelia; Prak, Narom; Quillet, Catherine; Ngeth, Chanchhaya; Ferradini, Laurent; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Laureillard, Didier; et al. (2008-05)
      BACKGROUND: The long-term maintenance of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains an important issue, especially in limited-resource settings where additional barriers exist. A cross-sectional study was performed 24 months after ART initiation for patients treated in Cambodia in order to estimate the prevalence and identify determinants of non-adherence. METHODS: Adults receiving ART for 24 +/- 2 months were considered eligible for the study. Self-reported non-adherence was defined according to an algorithm based on six items. The questionnaire also assessed ART-related side effects and HIV disclosure. HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load was measured using real-time PCR. Multivariate rare events logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with non-adherence. RESULTS: A total of 346 patients participated in the study. At 24 months, 95% of patients were adherent, 80% had HIV RNA <40 copies/ml and 75% had CD4+ T-cell counts >200 cells/mm3. Virological success was significantly higher in adherent patients than in non-adherent patients (81% versus 56%, P=0.021). Living in a rural area, limited HIV disclosure and perceived lipodystrophy were independently associated with non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: At 24 months, adherence to ART was high and explained positive virological outcomes. In order to maintain adherence and long-term virological benefits, special attention should be given to patients living in rural areas, those with lipodystrophy-related symptoms and others who express difficulties disclosing their condition to close family members.
    • Provision of antiretroviral therapy in South Africa: the nuts and bolts

      Bekker, Linda-Gail; Venter, Francois; Cohen, Karen; Goemare, Eric; Van Cutsem, Gilles; Boulle, Andrew; Wood, Robin (International Medical Press, 2014-10-13)
      Public sector antiretroviral provision had a slow start in South Africa despite a raging epidemic and a World AIDS conference that shed significant public light on the disparities of therapy access globally. This was largely due to political prevarication in the midst of AIDS denialism. There has been an unprecedented expansion in the HIV treatment programme since 2008. As a result, South Africa now has the largest number of patients on antiretroviral drugs in the world, and South African life expectancy has increased by more than a decade. However, this has led to a number of fiscal, logistic and operational challenges that the country must face as the treatment programme continues to expand. Challenges include increasing detection within communities, linkage and retention in care, while strengthening operational support functions such as consistent drug supply, health staffing and infrastructure, diagnostic services, programme monitoring and sustainable financing. As a middle-income country, albeit with marked income inequality, and the heaviest HIV burden in the world, South Africa is a test case of whether a large-scale public health programme can boast of success in the face of numerous other health-system challenges.
    • Resistance profiles after different periods of exposure to a first-line antiretroviral regimen in a Cameroonian cohort of HIV type-1-infected patients.

      Soria, A; Porten, K; Fampou-Toundji, J; Galli, L; Mougnutou, R; Buard, V; Kfutwah, A; Vessière, A; Rousset, D; Teck, R; et al. (2009-08)
      BACKGROUND: The lack of HIV type-1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) monitoring in resource-limited settings might favour the accumulation of resistance mutations and thus hamper second-line treatment efficacy. We investigated the factors associated with resistance after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the absence of virological monitoring. METHODS: Cross-sectional VL sampling of HIV-1-infected patients receiving first-line ART (nevirapine or efavirenz plus stavudine or zidovudine plus lamivudine) was carried out; those with a detectable VL were genotyped. RESULTS: Of the 573 patients undergoing VL sampling, 84 were genotyped. The mean number of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutations increased with the duration of ART exposure (P=0.02). Multivariable analysis showed that patients with a CD4+ T-cell count < or =50 cells/mm(3) at ART initiation (baseline) had a higher mean number of both NRTI and non-NRTI (NNRTI) mutations than those with a baseline CD4+ T-cell count >50 cells/mm(3) (2.10 versus 0.56; P<0.0001; and 1.65 versus 0.76; P=0.005, respectively). A baseline CD4+ T-cell count < or =50 cells/mm(3) predicted > or =1 NRTI mutation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 7.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.20-32.14), > or =1 NNRTI mutation (AOR 4.25, 95% CI 1.36-15.48), > or =1 thymidine analogue mutation (AOR 8.45, 95% CI 2.16-40.16) and resistance to didanosine (AOR 6.36, 95% CI 1.49-32.29) and etravirine (AOR 4.72, 95% CI 1.53-15.70). CONCLUSIONS: Without VL monitoring, the risk of drug resistance increases with the duration of ART and is associated with lower CD4+ T-cell counts at ART initiation. These data might help define strategies to preserve second-line treatment options in resource-limited settings.
    • Substitutions due to antiretroviral toxicity or contraindication in the first 3 years of antiretroviral therapy in a large South African cohort.

      Boulle, A; Orrell, C; Kaplan, R; Van Cutsem, G; McNally, M; Hilderbrand, K; Myer, L; Egger, M; Coetzee, D; Maartens, G; et al. (International Medical Press, 2007)
      INTRODUCTION: The patterns and reasons for antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug substitutions are poorly described in resource-limited settings. METHODS: Time to and reason for drug substitution were recorded in treatment-naive adults receiving ART in two primary care treatment programmes in Cape Town. The cumulative proportion of patients having therapy changed because of toxicity was described for each drug, and associations with these changes were explored in multivariate models. RESULTS: Analysis included 2,679 individuals followed for a median of 11 months. Median CD4+ T-cell count at baseline was 85 cells/microl. Mean weight was 59 kg, mean age was 32 years and 71% were women. All started non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based ART (60% on efavrienz) and 75% started on stavudine (d4T). After 3 years, 75% remained in care on-site, of whom 72% remained on their initial regimen. Substitutions due to toxicity of nevirapine (8% by 3 years), efavirenz (2%) and zidovudine (8%) occurred early. Substitutions on d4T occurred in 21% of patients by 3 years, due to symptomatic hyperlactataemia (5%), lipodystrophy (9%) or peripheral neuropathy (6%), and continued to accumulate over time. Those at greatest risk of hyperlactataemia or lipodystrophy were women on ART > or =6 months, weighing > or =75 kg at baseline. DISCUSSION: A high proportion of adult patients are able to tolerate their initial ART regimen for up to 3 years. In most instances treatment-limiting toxicities occur early, but continue to accumulate over time in patients on d4T. Whilst awaiting other treatment options, the risks of known toxicities could be minimized through early identification of patients at the highest risk.