• Clinical features and management of a severe paradoxical reaction associated with combined treatment of Buruli ulcer and HIV co-infection

      Wanda, Franck; Nkemenang, Patrick; Ehounou, Genevieve; Tchaton, Marie; Comte, Eric; Toutous Trellu, Laurence; Masouyé, Isabelle; Christinet, Vanessa; O' Brien, Daniel P (BioMed Central, 2014-07-30)
      In West and Central Africa Buruli ulcer (BU) and HIV co-infection is increasingly recognised and management of these two diseases combined is an emerging challenge for which there is little published information. In this case we present a severe paradoxical reaction occurring after commencing antibiotic treatment for BU combined with antiretroviral therapy for HIV, and describe its clinical features and management. This includes to our knowledge the first reported use of prednisolone in Africa to manage a severe paradoxical reaction related to BU treatment.
    • Combined Interventions to Reduce HIV Incidence in KwaZulu-Natal: A Modelling Study

      Blaizot, S; Huerga, H; Riche, B; Ellman, T; Shroufi, A; Etard, J; Ecochard, R (BioMed Central, 2017-07-26)
      Combined prevention interventions, including early antiretroviral therapy initiation, may substantially reduce HIV incidence in hyperendemic settings. Our aim was to assess the potential short-term impact of combined interventions on HIV spreading in the adult population of Mbongolwane and Eshowe (KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa) using sex- and age-specific scenarios, and age-targeted interventions.
    • A Comparison of Self-report and Antiretroviral Detection to inform estimates of Antiretroviral Therapy Coverage, Viral Load Suppression and HIV incidence in Kwazulu-Natal, South Africa

      Huerga, H; Shiferie, F; Grebe, E; Giuliani, R; Farhat, JB; Van-Cutsem, G; Cohen, K (BioMed Central, 2017-09-29)
      Accurately identifying individuals who are on antiretroviral therapy (ART) is important to determine ART coverage and proportion on ART who are virally suppressed. ART is also included in recent infection testing algorithms used to estimate incidence. We compared estimates of ART coverage, viral load suppression rates and HIV incidence using ART self-report and detection of antiretroviral (ARV) drugs and we identified factors associated with discordance between the methods.
    • Evaluation of HIV testing algorithms in Ethiopia: the role of the tie-breaker algorithm and weakly reacting test lines in contributing to a high rate of false positive HIV diagnoses

      Shanks, Leslie; Siddiqui, M; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Pearce, Neil; Ariti, Cono; Muluneh, Libsework; Pirou, Erwan; Ritmeijer, Koert; Masiga, Johnson; Abebe, Almaz (BioMed Central (Springer Science), 2015-02-03)
      BackgroundIn Ethiopia a tiebreaker algorithm using 3 rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) in series is used to diagnose HIV. Discordant results between the first 2 RDTs are resolved by a third `tiebreaker¿ RDT. Médecins Sans Frontières uses an alternate serial algorithm of 2 RDTs followed by a confirmation test for all double positive RDT results. The primary objective was to compare the performance of the tiebreaker algorithm with a serial algorithm, and to evaluate the addition of a confirmation test to both algorithms. A secondary objective looked at the positive predictive value (PPV) of weakly reactive test lines.MethodsThe study was conducted in two HIV testing sites in Ethiopia. Study participants were recruited sequentially until 200 positive samples were reached. Each sample was re-tested in the laboratory on the 3 RDTs and on a simple to use confirmation test, the Orgenics Immunocomb Combfirm® (OIC). The gold standard test was the Western Blot, with indeterminate results resolved by PCR testing.Results2620 subjects were included with a HIV prevalence of 7.7%. Each of the 3 RDTs had an individual specificity of at least 99%. The serial algorithm with 2 RDTs had a single false positive result (1 out of 204) to give a PPV of 99.5% (95% CI 97.3%-100%). The tiebreaker algorithm resulted in 16 false positive results (PPV 92.7%, 95% CI: 88.4%-95.8%). Adding the OIC confirmation test to either algorithm eliminated the false positives. All the false positives had at least one weakly reactive test line in the algorithm. The PPV of weakly reacting RDTs was significantly lower than those with strongly positive test lines.ConclusionThe risk of false positive HIV diagnosis in a tiebreaker algorithm is significant. We recommend abandoning the tie-breaker algorithm in favour of WHO recommended serial or parallel algorithms, interpreting weakly reactive test lines as indeterminate results requiring further testing except in the setting of blood transfusion, and most importantly, adding a confirmation test to the RDT algorithm. It is now time to focus research efforts on how best to translate this knowledge into practice at the field level.Trial registrationClinical Trial registration #: NCT01716299.
    • Field suitability and diagnostic accuracy of the Biocentric open real-time PCR platform for plasma-based HIV viral load quantification in Swaziland

      Kerschberger, B; Mpala, Q; Uribe, PAD; Maphalala, G; de la Tour, R; Kalombola, S; Bekele, A; Chawinga, T; Mliba, M; Ntshalintshali, N; et al. (BMC, 2018-11-14)
      Viral load (VL) testing is being scaled up in resource-limited settings. However, not all commercially available VL testing methods have been evaluated under field conditions. This study is one of a few to evaluate the Biocentric platform for VL quantification in routine practice in Sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Mean CD4 cell count changes in patients failing a first-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings.

      Calmy, Alexandra; Balestre, Eric; Bonnet, Fabrice; Boulle, Andrew; Sprinz, Eduardo; Wood, Robin; Delaporte, Eric; Messou, Eugène; McIntyre, James; El Filali, Kamal Marhoum; et al. (BMC, 2012-12)
      Changes in CD4 cell counts are poorly documented in individuals with low or moderate-level viremia while on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in resource-limited settings. We assessed the impact of on-going HIV-RNA replication on CD4 cell count slopes in patients treated with a first-line combination ART.
    • Opportunities to improve storage and transportation of blood specimens for CD4 testing in a rural district in Zimbabwe using BD vacutainer CD4 stabilization tubes: a stability and diagnostic accuracy study

      Fajardo, Emmanuel; Metcalf, Carol; Mbofana, Elton; van Vyve, Charlotte; Munyaradzi, Dhodho; Simons, Sandra; Kuhudzayi, Misheck; Bygrave, Helen (BioMed Central, 2014-10-22)
      BackgroundCD4+ T-cell testing of blood specimens collected in standard EDTA Vacutainer tubes and transported at ambient temperature, must be completed within 48 hours with the BD FACSCount¿ flow cytometer, restricting specimen collection in remote clinics with no on-site testing and limited specimen transport services. We conducted a study in Buhera District, Zimbabwe, to assess the stability and accuracy of CD4+ T-cell results of samples collected in Stabilization Tubes (ST) and stored at ambient temperature for varying time periods.MethodsPaired EDTA and ST samples were collected from 51 HIV-positive patients aged 18 years and older. CD4+ T-cell testing was done on arrival in the laboratory (Day 0). ST samples were retested on Days 3, 5, and 7. Nineteen ST samples were stored for an additional week and retested on Day 14.ResultsThere was a strong correlation between absolute CD4+ T-cell counts measured in the EDTA Day 0 reference sample and Day 7 ST sample (Spearman¿s rho: 0.9778; mean difference: ¿4.9 cells/¿L and limits of agreement (LOA): 98.5 and 88.7 cells/¿L); and the reference sample and Day 14 ST sample (Spearman¿s rho: 0.9632; mean difference 5.1 cells/¿L and LOA: ¿99.6 and 109.8 cells/¿L. Using a 350 cells/¿L threshold, the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV) were all 100% on Day 7, and 83.3%, 100%, 100% and 92.9% on Day 14. Using a 500 cells/¿L threshold, the sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NVP were 100%, 88.5%, 88.5% and 100% on Day 7 and 88.9%, 80.0%, 80.0% and 88.9% on Day 14.ConclusionsCD4 ST can be used and stored up to 7 days as a reliable alternative to standard EDTA tubes in settings where CD4+ T-cell testing within 48 hours is not feasible. Despite the small sample size, results suggest that ST may be stored up to 14 days at room temperature for CD4 testing, without compromising accuracy. However, further studies with larger sample sizes are needed to confirm this preliminary finding.
    • Potential Impact of Multiple Interventions on HIV Incidence in a Hyperendemic Region in Western Kenya: a Modelling Study

      Blaizot, S; Maman, D; Riche, B; Mukui, I; Kirubi, B; Ecochard, R; Etard, JF (BioMed Central, 2016-04-29)
      Multiple prevention interventions, including early antiretroviral therapy initiation, may reduce HIV incidence in hyperendemic settings. Our aim was to predict the short-term impact of various single and combined interventions on HIV spreading in the adult population of Ndhiwa subcounty (Nyanza Province, Kenya).
    • Risk factors for virological failure and subtherapeutic antiretroviral drug concentrations in HIV-positive adults treated in rural northwestern Uganda

      Ahoua, L; Guenther, G; Pinoges, L; Anguzu, P; Chaix, M L; Le Tiec, C; Balkan, S; Olson, D; Olaro, C; Pujades-Rodriguez, M; et al. (2009-06-03)
      ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about immunovirological treatment outcomes and adherence in HIV/AIDS patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) treated using a simplified management approach in rural areas of developing countries, or about the main factors influencing those outcomes in clinical practice. METHODS: Cross-sectional immunovirological, pharmacological, and adherence outcomes were evaluated in all patients alive and on fixed-dose ART combinations for 24 months, and in a random sample of those treated for 12 months. Risk factors for virological failure (>1,000 copies/mL) and subtherapeutic antiretroviral (ARV) concentrations were investigated with multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: At 12 and 24 months of ART, 72% (n=701) and 70% (n=369) of patients, respectively, were alive and in care. About 8% and 38% of patients, respectively, were diagnosed with immunological failure; and 75% and 72% of patients, respectively, had undetectable HIV RNA (<400 copies/mL). Risk factors for virological failure (>1,000 copies/mL) were poor adherence, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation, subtherapeutic NNRTI concentrations, general clinical symptoms, and lower weight than at baseline. About 14% of patients had low ARV plasma concentrations. Digestive symptoms and poor adherence to ART were risk factors for low ARV plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to improve both access to care and patient management to achieve better immunological and virological outcomes on ART are necessary to maximize the duration of first-line therapy.
    • Six-monthly appointment spacing for clinical visits as a model for retention in HIV Care in Conakry-Guinea: a cohort study

      Bekolo, CE; Diallo, A; Philips, M; Yuma, JD; Di Stefano, L; Drèze, S; Mouton, J; Koita, Y; Tiomtore, OW (BioMed Central, 2017-12-13)
      The outbreak of the Ebola virus disease (EVD) in 2014 led to massive dropouts in HIV care in Guinea. Meanwhile, Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) was implementing a six-monthly appointment spacing approach adapted locally as Rendez-vous de Six Mois (R6M) with an objective to improve retention in care. We sought to evaluate this innovative model of ART delivery in circumstances where access to healthcare is restricted.