• High incidence of intended partner pregnancy among men living with HIV in rural Uganda: Implications for safer conception services.

      Kaida, A; Kabakyenga, J; Bwana, M; Bajunirwe, F; Mayindike, W; Bennett, K; Kembabazi, A; Haberer, JE; Boum, Y; Martin, JN; et al. (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2019-04-15)
      Many men with HIV express fertility intentions and nearly half have HIV-uninfected sexual partners. We measured partner pregnancy among a cohort of men accessing antiretroviral therapy (ART) in Uganda. Self-reported partner pregnancy incidence and bloodwork (CD4, HIV-RNA) were collected quarterly. Interviewer-administered questionnaires assessed men's sexual and reproductive health annually and repeated at time of reported pregnancy (2011-2015). We measured partner pregnancy incidence overall, by pregnancy intention, and by reported partner HIV-serostatus. We assessed viral suppression (≤400 copies/mL) during the peri-conception period. Cox proportional hazard regression with repeated events identified predictors of partner pregnancy. Among 189 men, baseline median age was 39.9 years [IQR:34.7,47.0], years on ART was 3.9 [IQR:0.0,5.1], and 51% were virally suppressed. Over 530.2 person-years of follow-up, 63 men reported 85 partner pregnancies (incidence=16.0/100 person-years); 45% with HIV-serodifferent partners. By three years of follow-up, 30% of men reported a partner pregnancy, with no difference by partner HIV-serostatus (p=0.75). 69% of pregnancies were intended, 18% wanted but mis-timed, and 8% unwanted. 78% of men were virally suppressed prior to pregnancy report. Men who were younger (aHR:0.94/year;95%CI:0.89-0.99), had incomplete primary education (aHR:2.95;95%CI:1.36-6.40), and reported fertility desires (aHR:2.25;95%CI:1.04-4.85) had higher probability of partner pregnancy. A high incidence of intended partner pregnancy highlights the need to address men's reproductive goals within HIV care. Nearly half of pregnancy partners were at-risk for HIV and one-quarter of men were not virally suppressed during peri-conception. Safer conception care provides opportunity to support men's health and reproductive goals, while preventing HIV transmission to women and infants.
    • Should Urine-LAM Tests Be Used in TB Symptomatic HIV-Positive Patients When No CD4 Count Is Available? A Prospective Observational Cohort Study From Malawi

      Huerga, H; Rucker, SCM; Bastard, M; Dimba, A; Kamba, C; Amoros, I; Szumilin, E (Lippincott, Williams & Wilkins, 2020-01-01)
      Background: Current eligibility criteria for urine lateral-flow lipoarabinomannan assay (LF-LAM) in ambulatory, HIV-positive patients rely on the CD4 count. We investigated the diagnostic yield of LF-LAM and the 6-month mortality in ambulatory, TB symptomatic, HIV-positive patients regardless of their CD4 count. Methods: We conducted a prospective, observational study that included all ambulatory, ≥15-year-old, TB symptomatic (cough, weight loss, fever, or night sweats) HIV-positive patients presenting at 4 health facilities in Malawi. Patients received a clinical examination and were requested urine LF-LAM, sputum microscopy, and Xpert MTB/RIF. TB was defined as bacteriologically confirmed if Xpert was positive. Results: Of 485 patients included, 171 (35.3%) had a CD4 <200 and 32 (7.2%) were seriously ill. Median CD4 count was 341 cells/µL (interquartile range: 129–256). LAM was positive in 24.9% patients with CD4 < 200 (50% LAM grades 2–4) and 12.5% with CD4 ≥ 200 (12.8% LAM grades 2–4). Xpert was positive in 14.1% (44/312). Among Xpert-positive patients, LAM positivity was 56.7% (CD4 < 200) and 42.9% (CD4 ≥ 200), P = 0.393. Of the patients without an Xpert result, 13.4% (23/172) were LAM positive (ie, potentially missed patients). Overall, mortality was 9.2% (44/478). More pronounced LAM-positive patients had higher mortality than LAM-negative (grades 2–4: 36.0%; grade 1: 9.1%; negative: 7.4%; P < 0.001). LAM-positive patients with CD4 <200 cells/µL had higher risk of mortality than LAM negatives (adjusted hazard ratio: 3.2, 95% confidence interval: 1.4 to 7.2, P = 0.006), particularly those with LAM grades 2–4 (adjusted hazard ratio: 4.9, 95% confidence interval: 1.8 to 13.3, P = 0.002). Conclusions: Urine-LAM testing can be useful for TB diagnosis in HIV-positive TB-symptomatic patients with no CD4 cell count. LAM grade can identify patients at higher risk of death in this situation.