• Cost and cost-effectiveness of switching from d4T or AZT to a TDF-based first-line regimen in a resource-limited setting in rural Lesotho

      Jouquet, Guillaume; Bygrave, Helen; Kranzer, Katharina; Ford, Nathan; Gadot, Laurent; Lee, Janice; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Goemaere, Eric; Vlahakis, Natalie; Trivino, Laura; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-11-01)
      Latest World Health Organization guidelines recommend shifting away from Stavudine (d4T)-based regimens due to severe side effects. However, widespread replacement of d4T by Tenofovir (TDF) or Zidovudine (AZT) is hampered by cost concerns.
    • Distribution of antiretroviral treatment through self-forming groups of patients in Tete province, Mozambique

      Decroo, Tom; Telfer, Barbara; Biot, Marc; Maïkéré, Jacob; Dezembro, Sergio; Cumba, Luisa Isabel; Dores, Carla das; Chu, Kathryn; Ford, Nathan; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Tete, Mozambique; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Maputo, Mozambique; Provincial Health Department, Tete, Mozambique; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of International Health, Johns Hopkins School of Public Health, Baltimore, MD; and Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa (2010-11-13)
      BACKGROUND
    • Drug resistance and viral tropism in HIV-1 subtype C-infected patients in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa: implications for future treatment options

      Singh, Ashika; Sunpath, Henry; Green, Taryn N; Padayachi, Nagavelli; Hiramen, Keshni; Lie, Yolanda; Anton, Elizabeth D; Murphy, Richard; Reeves, Jacqueline D; Kuritzkes, Daniel R; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-11-01)
      Drug resistance poses a significant challenge for the successful application of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) globally. Furthermore, emergence of HIV-1 isolates that preferentially use CXCR4 as a coreceptor for cell entry, either as a consequence of natural viral evolution or HAART use, may compromise the efficacy of CCR5 antagonists as alternative antiviral therapy.
    • Time to initiation of antiretroviral therapy among patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in Cape Town, South Africa

      Lawn, Stephen D; Campbell, Lucy; Kaplan, Richard; Boulle, Andrew; Cornell, Morna; Kerschberger, Bernhard; Morrow, Carl; Little, Francesca; Egger, Matthias; Wood, Robin; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-06-01)
      We studied the time interval between starting tuberculosis treatment and commencing antiretroviral treatment (ART) in HIV-infected patients (n = 1433; median CD4 count 71 cells per microliter, interquartile range: 32-132) attending 3 South African township ART services between 2002 and 2008. The overall median delay was 2.66 months (interquartile range: 1.58-4.17). In adjusted analyses, delays varied between treatment sites but were shorter for patients with lower CD4 counts and those treated in more recent calendar years. During the most recent period (2007-2008), 4.7%, 19.7%, and 51.1% of patients started ART within 2, 4, and 8 weeks of tuberculosis treatment, respectively. Operational barriers must be tackled to permit further acceleration of ART initiation as recommended by 2010 WHO ART guidelines.
    • Virologic failure and second-line antiretroviral therapy in children in South Africa--the IeDEA Southern Africa collaboration

      Davies, Mary-Ann; Moultrie, Harry; Eley, Brian; Rabie, Helena; Van Cutsem, Gilles; Giddy, Janet; Wood, Robin; Technau, Karl; Keiser, Olivia; Egger, Matthias; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-03-01)
      With expanding pediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) access, children will begin to experience treatment failure and require second-line therapy. We evaluated the probability and determinants of virologic failure and switching in children in South Africa.