• Comparison of Self-Reported Alcohol Consumption to Phosphatidylethanol Measurement among HIV-Infected Patients Initiating Antiretroviral Treatment in Southwestern Uganda

      Bajunirwe, Francis; Haberer, Jessica E; Boum, Yap; Hunt, Peter; Mocello, Rain; Martin, Jeffrey N; Bangsberg, David R; Hahn, Judith A (Public Library of Science, 2014-12-01)
      Alcohol consumption among HIV-infected patients may accelerate HIV disease progression or reduce antiretroviral therapy adherence. Self-reported alcohol use is frequently under-reported due to social desirability and recall bias. The aim of this study was to compare self-reported alcohol consumption to phosphatidylethanol (PEth), a biomarker of alcohol consumption, and to estimate the correlation between multiple measures of self-reported alcohol consumption with PEth.
    • Expanding Access to HIV Viral Load Testing: A Systematic Review of RNA Stability in EDTA Tubes and PPT beyond Current Time and Temperature Thresholds

      Bonner, Kimberly; Siemieniuk, Reed A; Boozary, Andrew; Roberts, Teri; Fajardo, Emmanuel; Cohn, Jennifer (Public Library of Science, 2014-12-01)
      HIV viral load (VL) testing is the gold standard for antiretroviral treatment monitoring, but many barriers exist to VL testing in resource-limited settings, including storage and transport limitations for whole blood and plasma. Data from various studies indicate that HIV RNA is stable beyond current recommendations. We conducted a systematic review to assess stability data of HIV RNA in whole blood and plasma across times and temperatures.
    • Monitoring HIV Viral Load in Resource Limited Settings: Still a Matter of Debate?

      Arnedo, M; Alonso, E; Eisenberg, N; Ibáñez, L; Ferreyra, C; Jaén, A; Flevaud, L; Khamadi, S; Roddy, P; Gatell, JM; Dalmau, D (Public Library of Science, 2012-12-06)
      Consequences of lack of viral monitoring in predicting the effects of development of HIV drug resistance mutations during HAART in resource-limited settings (RLS) is still a matter of debate.
    • Navigating the risks of prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV services in Kibera, Kenya: Barriers to engaging and remaining in care

      Thomson, KA; Telfer, B; Opondo Awiti, P; Munge, J; Ngunga, M; Reid, A (Public Library of Science, 2018-01-24)
      Within the first year of implementation, 43% of women who tested HIV positive at their first antenatal care visit were no longer retained and being followed in the free prevention of mother to child transmission (PMTCT) of HIV program offered by the Kenyan Ministry of Health and Médecins Sans Frontières in the informal settlement of Kibera, Nairobi. This study aimed to explore barriers to enrolling and remaining engaged in PMTCT services throughout the pregnancy and postpartum periods. Qualitative data from 31 focus group discussions and 35 in-depth interviews across six stakeholder groups that included women, men, and PMTCT service providers were analyzed. Using an inductive exploratory approach, four researchers coded the data and identified key themes. Five themes emerged from the data that may influence attrition from PMTCT service in this setting: 1) HIV in the context of Kibera, 2) knowledge of HIV status, 3) knowledge of PMTCT, 4) disclosure of HIV status, and 5) male partner support for PMTCT services. A new HIV diagnosis during pregnancy immediately triggered an ongoing risk assessment of perceived hazards in the home, community, and clinic environments that could occur as a result of female participation in PMTCT services. Male partners were a major influence in this risk assessment, but were generally unaware of PMTCT services. To preserve relationships with male partners, meet community expectations of womanhood, and maintain confidentiality while following recommendations of healthcare providers, women had to continuously weigh the risks and benefits of PMTCT services and interventions. Community-based HIV testing and PMTCT education, male involvement in antenatal care, and counseling customized to assist each woman in her own unique risk assessment, may improve uptake of and retention in care and optimize the HIV prevention benefit of PMTCT interventions.
    • Population-level HIV incidence estimates using a combination of synthetic cohort and recency biomarker approaches in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa

      Grebe, E; Welte, A; Johnson, LF; van Cutsem, G; Puren, A; Ellman, T; Etard, JF; Huerga, H (Public Library of Science, 2018-09-13)
      There is a notable absence of consensus on how to generate estimates of population-level incidence. Incidence is a considerably more sensitive indicator of epidemiological trends than prevalence, but is harder to estimate. We used a novel hybrid method to estimate HIV incidence by age and sex in a rural district of KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.
    • Surveillance of HIV-1 Pol Transmitted Drug Resistance in Acutely and Recently Infected Antiretroviral Drug-Naïve Persons in Eural Western Kenya

      Onywera, H; Maman, D; Inzaule, S; Auma, E; Were, K; Fredrick, H; Owiti, P; Opollo, V; Etard, JF; Mukui, I; Kim, AA; Zeh, C (Public Library of Science, 2017-02-08)
      HIV-1 transmitted drug resistance (TDR) is of increasing public health concern in sub-Saharan Africa with the rollout of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy. Such data are, however, limited in Kenya, where HIV-1 drug resistance testing is not routinely performed. From a population-based household survey conducted between September and November 2012 in rural western Kenya, we retrospectively assessed HIV-1 TDR baseline rates, its determinants, and genetic diversity among drug-naïve persons aged 15-59 years with acute HIV-1 infections (AHI) and recent HIV-1 infections (RHI) as determined by nucleic acid amplification test and both Limiting Antigen and BioRad avidity immunoassays, respectively. HIV-1 pol sequences were scored for drug resistance mutations using Stanford HIVdb and WHO 2009 mutation guidelines. HIV-1 subtyping was computed in MEGA6. Eighty seven (93.5%) of the eligible samples were successfully sequenced. Of these, 8 had at least one TDR mutation, resulting in a TDR prevalence of 9.2% (95% CI 4.7-17.1). No TDR was observed among persons with AHI (n = 7). TDR prevalence was 4.6% (95% CI 1.8-11.2) for nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs), 6.9% (95% CI 3.2-14.2) for non- nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NNRTIs), and 1.2% (95% CI 0.2-6.2) for protease inhibitors. Three (3.4% 95% CI 0.8-10.1) persons had dual-class NRTI/NNRTI resistance. Predominant TDR mutations in the reverse transcriptase included K103N/S (4.6%) and M184V (2.3%); only M46I/L (1.1%) occurred in the protease. All the eight persons were predicted to have different grades of resistance to the ARV regimens, ranging from potential low-level to high-level resistance. HIV-1 subtype distribution was heterogeneous: A (57.5%), C (6.9%), D (21.8%), G (2.3%), and circulating recombinant forms (11.5%). Only low CD4 count was associated with TDR (p = 0.0145). Our findings warrant the need for enhanced HIV-1 TDR monitoring in order to inform on population-based therapeutic guidelines and public health interventions.
    • Toxicity associated with stavudine dose reduction from 40 to 30 mg in first-line antiretroviral therapy.

      Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Dantony, Emmanuelle; Pinoges, Loretxu; Ecochard, René; Etard, Jean-François; Carrillo-Casas, Esther; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Clinical Research Department, Epicentre, Paris, France. mar.pujades@epicentre.msf.org (2011-11)
      To compare the incidence and timing of toxicity associated with the use of a reduced dose of stavudine from 40 to 30 mg in first-line antiretroviral therapy (ART) for HIV treatment and to investigate associated risk factors.
    • Treatment Response and Mortality among Patients Starting Antiretroviral Therapy with and without Kaposi Sarcoma: A Cohort Study

      Maskew, Mhairi; Fox, Matthew P; van Cutsem, Gilles; Chu, Kathryn; Macphail, Patrick; Boulle, Andrew; Egger, Matthias; for IeDEA Southern Africa; Health Economics and Epidemiology Research Office, Department of Internal Medicine, School of Clinical Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of the Witwatersrand, Johannesburg, South Africa. mmaskew@heroza.org (2013-06)
      Improved survival among HIV-infected individuals on antiretroviral therapy (ART) has focused attention on AIDS-related cancers including Kaposi sarcoma (KS). However, the effect of KS on response to ART is not well-described in Southern Africa. We assessed the effect of KS on survival and immunologic and virologic treatment responses at 6- and 12-months after initiation of ART.