• Cotrimoxazole prophylaxis for HIV-positive TB patients in developing countries.

      Zachariah, R; Massaquoi, M; Medecins sans Frontieres, Operational Research HIV-TB, Medical department, Brussels Operational Center, 68 Rue de Gaspench, L-1617 Luxemburg. zachariah@internet.lu (2006-04)
      Despite provisional recommendations from the World Health Organization and UNAIDS that cotrimoxazole (CTX) prophylaxis be offered to all individuals living with AIDS, including HIV-positive patients with TB, its routine use in developing countries particularly Africa has been minimal. Concerns were expressed regarding its effectiveness in areas of high bacterial resistance, that its widespread use might substantially increase bacterial cross-resistance in the community and that this intervention might promote resistance of malaria parasites to sulphadoxine-pyrimethamine. We review the current evidence on the above concerns and highlight the main operational considerations related to implementing CTX prophylaxis as a basic component of care for HIV-positive TB patients in developing countries.
    • Cytomegalovirus retinitis: the neglected disease of the AIDS pandemic.

      Heiden, D; Ford, N; Wilson, D; Rodriguez, W; Margolis, T; Janssens, B; Bedelu, M; Tun, N; Goemaere, E; Saranchuk, P; Sabapathy, K; Smithuis, F; Luyirika, E; Drew, W L; Department of Ophthalmology and Pacific Vision Foundation, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California, United States of America. dheidenpea@yahoo.com (PLoS, 2007-12)
    • Earlier versus later start of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with tuberculosis.

      Blanc, F-X; Sok, T; Laureillard, D; Borand, L; Rekacewicz, C; Nerrienet, E; Madec, Y; Marcy, O; Chan, S; Prak, N; Kim, C; Lak, K K; Hak, C; Dim, B; Sin, C I; Sun, S; Guillard, B; Sar, B; Vong, S; Fernandez, M; Fox, L; Delfraissy, J-F; Goldfeld, A E; Pneumology Unit, Internal Medicine Department, Bicêtre Hospital, Assistance Publique–Hôpitaux de Paris, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, France. xavier.blanc@bct.aphp.fr (2011-10-20)
      Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy.
    • Eye exam with indirect ophthalmoscopy for diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis in patients with HIV/AIDS

      Heiden, David; Margolis, Todd P; Lowinger, Alan; Saranchuk, Peter (BMJ Publishing Group, 2013-05-01)
    • HIV and cytomegalovirus in Thailand.

      Chua, A; Wilson, D; Ford, N (Elsevier, 2005-06)
    • Human resources for control of tuberculosis and HIV-associated tuberculosis.

      Harries, A D; Zachariah, R; Bergström, K; Blanc, L; Salaniponi, F; Elzinga, G; National Tuberculosis Control Programme, Lilongwe, Malawi. adharries@malawi.net (2005-02)
      The global targets for tuberculosis (TB) control were postponed from 2000 to 2005, but on current evidence a further postponement may be necessary. Of the constraints preventing these targets being met, the primary one appears to be the lack of adequately trained and qualified staff. This paper outlines: 1) the human resources and skills for global TB and human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) TB control, including the human resources for implementing the DOTS strategy, the additional human resources for implementing joint HIV-TB control strategies and what is known about human resource gaps at global level; 2) the attempts to quantify human resource gaps by focusing on a small country in sub-Saharan Africa, Malawi; and 3) the main constraints to human resources and their possible solutions, under six main headings: human resource planning; production of human resources; distribution of the work-force; motivation and staff retention; quality of existing staff; and the effect of HIV/AIDS. We recommend an urgent shift in thinking about the human resource paradigm, and exhort international policy makers and the donor community to make a concerted effort to bridge the current gaps by investing for real change.
    • Low uptake of antiretroviral therapy after admission with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

      Murphy, R A; Sunpath, H; Taha, B; Kappagoda, S; Maphasa, K T M; Kuritzkes, D R; Smeaton, L; Doctors Without Borders USA, New York, USA; McCord Hospital, South Africa; Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Infectious Disease and Geographic Medicine, California, USA; Zoe-Life, South Africa; Section of Retroviral Therapeutics, Massachusetts, USA; Centre for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Massachusetts, USA (2010-07-01)
      A prospective cohort study was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected in-patients with tuberculosis (TB) or other opportunistic infections (OIs) in South Africa to estimate subsequent antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake and survival.
    • Response to highly active antiretroviral therapy among severely immuno-compromised HIV-infected patients in Cambodia.

      Madec, Y; Laureillard, D; Pinoges, L; Fernandez, M; Prak, N; Ngeth, C; Moeung, S; Song, S; Balkan, S; Ferradini, L; Quillet, C; Fontanet, A; Unité d'Epidémiologie des Maladies Emergentes, Institut Pasteur, 25-28 rue du Docteur Roux, 75015 Paris, France. (2007-01-30)
      BACKGROUND: HAART efficacy was evaluated in a real-life setting in Phnom Penh (Médecins Sans Frontières programme) among severely immuno-compromised patients. METHODS: Factors associated with mortality and immune reconstitution were identified using Cox proportional hazards and logistic regression models, respectively. RESULTS: From July 2001 to April 2005, 1735 patients initiated HAART, with median CD4 cell count of 20 (inter-quartile range, 6-78) cells/microl. Mortality at 2 years increased as the CD4 cell count at HAART initiation decreased, (4.4, 4.5, 7.5 and 24.7% in patients with CD4 cell count > 100, 51-100, 21-50 and < or = 20 cells/microl, respectively; P < 10). Cotrimoxazole and fluconazole prophylaxis were protective against mortality as long as CD4 cell counts remained < or = 200 and < or = 100 cells/microl, respectively. The proportion of patients with successful immune reconstitution (CD4 cell gain > 100 cells/microl at 6 months) was 46.3%; it was lower in patients with previous ART exposure [odds ratio (OR), 0.16; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.05-0.45] and patients developing a new opportunistic infection/immune reconstitution infection syndromes (OR, 0.71; 95% CI, 0.52-0.98). Similar efficacy was found between the stavudine-lamivudine-nevirapine fixed dose combination and the combination stavudine-lamivudine-efavirenz in terms of mortality and successful immune reconstitution. No surrogate markers for CD4 cell change could be identified among total lymphocyte count, haemoglobin, weight and body mass index. CONCLUSION: Although CD4 cell count-stratified mortality rates were similar to those observed in industrialized countries for patients with CD4 cell count > 50 cells/microl, patients with CD4 cell count < or = 20 cells/microl posed a real challenge to clinicians. Widespread voluntary HIV testing and counselling should be encouraged to allow HAART initiation before the development of severe immuno-suppression.
    • Risk Factors for High Early Mortality in Patients on Antiretroviral Treatment in a Rural District of Malawi.

      Zachariah, R; Fitzgerald, M; Massaquoi, M; Pasulani, O; Arnould, L; Makombe, S D; Harries, A D; Medecins sans Frontieres, Operational Research, Brussels Operational Center, Belgium. zachariah@internet.lu (2006-11-28)
      OBJECTIVES: Among adults started on antiretroviral treatment (ART) in a rural district hospital (a) to determine the cumulative proportion of deaths that occur within 3 and 6 months of starting ART, and (b) to identify risk factors that may be associated with such mortality. DESIGN AND SETTING: A cross-sectional analytical study set in Thyolo district, Malawi. METHODS: Over a 2-year period (April 2003 to April 2005) mortality within the first 3 and 6 months of starting ART was determined and risk factors were examined. RESULTS: A total of 1507 individuals (517 men and 990 women), whose median age was 35 years were included in the study. There were a total of 190 (12.6%) deaths on ART of which 116 (61%) occurred within the first 3 months (very early mortality) and 150 (79%) during the first 6 months of initiating ART. Significant risk factors associated with such mortality included WHO stage IV disease, a baseline CD4 cell count under 50 cells/mul and increasing grades of malnutrition. A linear trend in mortality was observed with increasing grades of malnutrition (chi for trend = 96.1, P
    • Scaling-up co-trimoxazole prophylaxis in HIV-exposed and HIV-infected children in high HIV-prevalence countries.

      Zachariah, R; Harries, A D; Luo, C; Bachman, G; Graham, S M; Médecins Sans Frontières, Medical department (Operational Research), Brussels Operational Center, Brussels, Belgium. zachariah@internet.lu (Elsevier, 2007-10)
      Co-trimoxazole (trimethoprim-sulfamethoxazole) is a widely available antibiotic that substantially reduces HIV-related morbidity and mortality in both adults and children. Prophylaxis with co-trimoxazole is a recommended intervention of proven benefit that could serve not only as an initial step towards improving paediatric care in young children with limited access to antiretroviral treatment, but also as an important complement to antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings. Despite co-trimoxazole's known clinical benefits, the potential operational benefits, and favourable recommendations by WHO, UNAIDS, and UNICEF, its routine use in developing countries--particularly sub-Saharan Africa--has remained limited. Out of an estimated 4 million children in need of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis (HIV-exposed and HIV-infected), only 4% are currently receiving this intervention. We discuss some of the major barriers preventing the scale-up of co-trimoxazole prophylaxis for children in countries with a high prevalence of HIV and propose specific actions required to tackle these challenges.
    • They call it "patient selection" in Khayelitsha: the experience of Médecins Sans Frontières-South Africa in enrolling patients to receive antiretroviral treatment for HIV/AIDS

      Fox, Renée C; Goemaere, Eric; University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, USA; Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) - South Africa (2006-05-02)
    • Time to initiation of antiretroviral therapy among patients with HIV-associated tuberculosis in Cape Town, South Africa

      Lawn, Stephen D; Campbell, Lucy; Kaplan, Richard; Boulle, Andrew; Cornell, Morna; Kerschberger, Bernhard; Morrow, Carl; Little, Francesca; Egger, Matthias; Wood, Robin; The Desmond Tutu HIV Centre, Institute for Infectious Disease and Molecular Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Department of Clinical Research, Faculty of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, London School of Hygiene & Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Department of Statistical Sciences, Faculty of Science, University of Cape Town, South Africa; School of Public Health and Family Medicine, Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Cape Town, South Africa; Division of International and Environmental Health, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM), University of Bern, Switzerland (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-06-01)
      We studied the time interval between starting tuberculosis treatment and commencing antiretroviral treatment (ART) in HIV-infected patients (n = 1433; median CD4 count 71 cells per microliter, interquartile range: 32-132) attending 3 South African township ART services between 2002 and 2008. The overall median delay was 2.66 months (interquartile range: 1.58-4.17). In adjusted analyses, delays varied between treatment sites but were shorter for patients with lower CD4 counts and those treated in more recent calendar years. During the most recent period (2007-2008), 4.7%, 19.7%, and 51.1% of patients started ART within 2, 4, and 8 weeks of tuberculosis treatment, respectively. Operational barriers must be tackled to permit further acceleration of ART initiation as recommended by 2010 WHO ART guidelines.
    • Tuberculosis and the risk of opportunistic infections and cancers in HIV-infected patients starting ART in Southern Africa.

      Fenner, Lukas; Reid, Stewart E; Fox, Matthew P; Garone, Daniela; Wellington, Maureen; Prozesky, Hans; Zwahlen, Marcel; Schomaker, Michael; Wandeler, Gilles; Kancheya, Nzali; Boulle, Andrew; Wood, Robin; Henostroza, German; Egger, Matthias; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. lfenner@ispm.unibe.ch (2013-02)
      To investigate the incidence of selected opportunistic infections (OIs) and cancers and the role of a history of tuberculosis (TB) as a risk factor for developing these conditions in HIV-infected patients starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) in Southern Africa.
    • Very early mortality in patients starting antiretroviral treatment at primary health centres in rural Malawi.

      Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Katie; Moses, Massaquoi; Manzi, Marcel; Line, Arnould; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Harries, Anthony D; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Medical Department, Brussels, Belgium. zachariah@internet.lu (2009-07-15)
      OBJECTIVES: To report on the cumulative proportion of deaths occurring within 3 months of starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) and to identify factors associated with such deaths, among adults at primary health centres in a rural district of Malawi. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study: from June 2006 to April 2008, deaths occurring over a 3-month period were determined and risk factors examined. RESULTS: A total of 2316 adults (706 men and 1610 women; median age 35 years) were included in the analysis and followed up for a total of 1588 person-years (PY); 277 (12%) people died, of whom 206 (74%) people died within 3 months of initiating ART (cumulative incidence: 13.0; 95% confidence interval: 11.3-14.8 per 100 PY of follow-up). Significant risk factors associated with early deaths included male sex, WHO stage 4 disease, oesophageal or persistent oral candidiasis and unexplained presumed or measured weight loss >10%. One in every 3 patients who either died or was lost to follow up had unexplained weight loss >10%, and survival in this group was significantly different from patients without this condition. CONCLUSIONS: Seven in 10 individuals initiating ART at primary health centres die early. Specific groups of patients are at higher risk of such mortality and should receive priority attention, care and support.
    • Voluntary Counselling, HIV Testing and Adjunctive Cotrimoxazole Reduces Mortality in Tuberculosis Patients in Thyolo, Malawi.

      Zachariah, R; Spielmann M P; Chinji, C; Gomani, P; Arendt, V; Hargreaves, N J; Salaniponi, F M L; Harries, A D; Medecins Sans Frontieres-Luxembourg, Blantyre, Malawi. zachariah@internet.Lu (2003-05-02)
      OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of voluntary counselling, HIV testing and adjunctive cotrimoxazole in reducing mortality in a cohort of tuberculosis (TB) patients registered under routine programme conditions in a rural district of Malawi. DESIGN: 'Before' and 'after' cohort study using historical controls. METHODS: Between 1 July 1999 and 30 June 2000 all TB patients were started on standardized anti-TB treatment, and offered voluntary counselling and HIV testing (VCT). Those found to be HIV-positive were offered cotrimoxazole at a dose of 480 mg twice daily, provided there were no contraindications. Side-effects were monitored clinically. End-of-treatment outcomes in this cohort (intervention group) were compared with a cohort registered between 1 July 1998 and 30 June 1999 in whom VCT and cotrimoxazole was not offered (control group). FINDINGS: A total of 1986 patients was registered in the study: 1061 in the intervention group and 925 in the control cohort. In the intervention group, 1019 (96%) patients were counselled pre-test, 964 (91%) underwent HIV testing and 938 (88%) were counselled post-test. The overall HIV-seroprevalence rate was 77%. A total of 693 patients were given cotrimoxazole of whom 14 (2%) manifested minor dermatological reactions. The adjusted relative risk of death in the intervention group compared with the control group was 0.81 (P < 0.001). The number needed to treat with VCT and adjunctive cotrimoxazole to prevent one death during anti-TB treatment was 12.5. INTERPRETATION: This study shows that VCT and adjunctive cotrimoxazole is feasible, safe and reduces mortality rates in TB patients under routine programme conditions.