• Adherence to HIV post-exposure prophylaxis in victims of sexual assault: a systematic review and meta-analysis

      Chacko, Liza; Ford, Nathan; Sbaiti, Mariam; Siddiqui, Ruby; Imperial College London, St Mary's Hospital, London, UK; Médecins Sans Frontières, Doctors without Borders (MSF-UK), London, UK; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa (BMJ Publishing Group, 2012-02-13)
      ObjectiveTo assess adherence to post-exposure prophylaxis (PEP) for the prevention of HIV infection in victims of sexual assault.MethodsThe authors carried out a systematic review, random effects meta-analysis and meta-regression of studies reporting adherence to PEP among victims of sexual violence. Seven electronic databases were searched. Our primary outcome was adherence; secondary outcomes included defaulting, refusal and side effects.Results2159 titles were screened, and 24 studies matching the inclusion criteria were taken through to analysis. The overall proportion of patients adhering to PEP (23 cohort studies, 2166 patients) was 40.3% (95% CI 32.5% to 48.1%), and the overall proportion of patients defaulting from care (18 cohorts, 1972 patients) was 41.2% (95% CI 31.1% to 51.4%). Adherence appeared to be higher in developing countries compared with developed countries.ConclusionsAdherence to PEP is poor in all settings. Interventions are needed to support adherence.
    • Association between older age and adverse outcomes on antiretroviral therapy: a cohort analysis of programme data from nine countries.

      Greig, Jane; Casas, Esther C; O'Brien, Daniel P; Mills, Edward J; Ford, Nathan; Médecins Sans Frontières, London, UK. jane.greig@london.msf.org (2012-07-31)
      Recent studies have highlighted the increased risk of adverse outcomes among older patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We report on the associations between older age and adverse outcomes in HIV/AIDS antiretroviral programmes across 17 programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Cytomegalovirus retinitis: the neglected disease of the AIDS pandemic.

      Heiden, D; Ford, N; Wilson, D; Rodriguez, W; Margolis, T; Janssens, B; Bedelu, M; Tun, N; Goemaere, E; Saranchuk, P; Sabapathy, K; Smithuis, F; Luyirika, E; Drew, W L; Department of Ophthalmology and Pacific Vision Foundation, California Pacific Medical Center, San Francisco, California, United States of America. dheidenpea@yahoo.com (PLoS, 2007-12)
    • Driving a decade of change: HIV/AIDS, patents and access to medicines for all

      Hoen, Ellen 't; Berger, Jonathan; Calmy, Alexandra; Moon, Suerie; Medicines Patent Pool Initiative, UNITAID Secretariat, Geneva, Switzerland; SECTION27, Braamfontein, Johannesburg, South Africa; HIV Unit, Division of Infectious Disease, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland; Médecins Sans Frontières Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, Geneva, Switzerland; Sustainability Science Program, Center for International Development, Kennedy School of Government, Harvard University, Cambridge, MA, USA (BioMed Central, 2011-03-27)
      Since 2000, access to antiretroviral drugs to treat HIV infection has dramatically increased to reach more than five million people in developing countries. Essential to this achievement was the dramatic reduction in antiretroviral prices, a result of global political mobilization that cleared the way for competitive production of generic versions of widely patented medicines.Global trade rules agreed upon in 1994 required many developing countries to begin offering patents on medicines for the first time. Government and civil society reaction to expected increases in drug prices precipitated a series of events challenging these rules, culminating in the 2001 World Trade Organization's Doha Declaration on the Agreement on Trade-Related Aspects of Intellectual Property Rights and Public Health. The Declaration affirmed that patent rules should be interpreted and implemented to protect public health and to promote access to medicines for all. Since Doha, more than 60 low- and middle-income countries have procured generic versions of patented medicines on a large scale.Despite these changes, however, a "treatment timebomb" awaits. First, increasing numbers of people need access to newer antiretrovirals, but treatment costs are rising since new ARVs are likely to be more widely patented in developing countries. Second, policy space to produce or import generic versions of patented medicines is shrinking in some developing countries. Third, funding for medicines is falling far short of needs. Expanded use of the existing flexibilities in patent law and new models to address the second wave of the access to medicines crisis are required.One promising new mechanism is the UNITAID-supported Medicines Patent Pool, which seeks to facilitate access to patents to enable competitive generic medicines production and the development of improved products. Such innovative approaches are possible today due to the previous decade of AIDS activism. However, the Pool is just one of a broad set of policies needed to ensure access to medicines for all; other key measures include sufficient and reliable financing, research and development of new products targeted for use in resource-poor settings, and use of patent law flexibilities. Governments must live up to their obligations to protect access to medicines as a fundamental component of the human right to health.
    • Editorial: The AIDS crisis, cost-effectiveness and academic activism.

      Boelaert, M; Van Damme, W; Meessen, B; Van der Stuyft, P (2002-12)
    • 'Face Up to the Truth': Helping Gay Men in Vietnam Protect Themselves from AIDS.

      Wilson, D; Cawthorne, P; Médecins Sans Frontières, Belgium. msfbthai@asianet.co.th (1999-01)
      Appropriate AIDS prevention information is not available in Vietnam for men who have sex with men. Current AIDS prevention messages can be misunderstood with potentially dangerous results. We outline some features of gay culture in a provincial city in Vietnam. We describe the activities of a peer educator who made contact with a small group of young gay men during 1996 and 1997. All the young men were ill-informed about AIDS. Their attitudes and sexual practices made them vulnerable to AIDS. The peer educator provided clear information and emotional support. The peer education was done without government endorsement and on a very low budget.
    • Gender differences in immune reconstitution: a multicentric cohort analysis in sub-saharan Africa

      Maman, David; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Subtil, Fabien; Pinoges, Loretxu; McGuire, Megan; Ecochard, Rene; Etard, Jean-François; Epicentre, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Hospices Civils de Lyon, Service de Biostatistique, Lyon, France; TransVIHMI, Montpellier, France; Université de Lyon, Lyon, France; Université Lyon I, Villeurbanne, France; 6 Laboratoire de Biométrie et Biologie Evolutive, Equipe Biostatistique Santé, Pierre-Bénite, France (Public Library of Science (PLoS), 2012-02-17)
      In sub-Saharan Africa, men living with HIV often start ART at more advanced stages of disease and have higher early mortality than women. We investigated gender difference in long-term immune reconstitution.
    • HIV prevention, care, and treatment in two prisons in Thailand.

      Wilson, D; Ford, N; Ngammee, V; Chua, A; Kyaw, M K K; Médecins Sans Frontières, Bangkapi, Bangkok, Thailand. (Public Library of Science, 2007-06)
    • HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment.

      Goemaere, E; Ford, N; Benatar, S R (Elsevier, 2002-07-06)
    • Home-based HIV counseling and testing as a gateway to earlier initiation of antiretroviral therapy

      Mills, Edward J; Ford, Nathan; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Canada; Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, South Africa (Oxford University Press, 2011-12-08)
    • Implementing antiretroviral therapy in rural communities: the Lusikisiki model of decentralized HIV/AIDS care.

      Bedelu, M; Ford, N; Hilderbrand, K; Reuter, H; Médecins Sans Frontières, Lusikisiki, South Africa. (Infectious Diseases Society of America, 2007-12-01)
      Health worker shortages are a major bottleneck to scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART), particularly in rural areas. In Lusikisiki, a rural area of South Africa with a population of 150,000 serviced by 1 hospital and 12 clinics, Médecins Sans Frontières has been supporting a program to deliver human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) services through decentralization to primary health care clinics, task shifting (including nurse-initiated as opposed to physician-initiated treatment), and community support. This approach has allowed for a rapid scale-up of treatment with satisfactory outcomes. Although the general approach in South Africa is to provide ART through hospitals-which seriously limits access for many people, if not the majority of people-1-year outcomes in Lusikisiki are comparable in the clinics and hospital. The greater proximity and acceptability of services at the clinic level has led to a faster enrollment of people into treatment and better retention of patients in treatment (2% vs. 19% lost to follow-up). In all, 2200 people were receiving ART in Lusikisiki in 2006, which represents 95% coverage. Maintaining quality and coverage will require increased resource input from the public sector and full acceptance of creative approaches to implementation, including task shifting and community involvement.
    • Involving Traditional Healers in AIDS Education and Counselling in Sub-Saharan Africa: A Review

      King, R; Homsy, J; Médecins Sans Frontières-Switzerland in Kampala, Uganda. (1997)
    • (The Lancet)red: a missed opportunity.

      Calmy, A; Pascual, F; Shettle, S; de la Vega, F G; Ford, N (Elsevier, 2006-09-23)
    • Mortality, AIDS-morbidity, and loss to follow-up by current CD4 cell count among HIV-1-infected adults receiving antiretroviral therapy in Africa and Asia: data from the ANRS 12222 collaboration

      Gabillard, Delphine; Lewden, Charlotte; Ndoye, Ibra; Moh, Raoul; Segeral, Olivier; Tonwe-Gold, Besigin; Etard, Jean-François; Pagnaroat, Men; Fournier-Nicolle, Isabelle; Eholié, Serge; Konate, Issouf; Minga, Albert; Mpoudi-Ngole, Eitel; Koulla-Shiro, Sinata; Zannou, Djimon Marcel; Anglaret, Xavier; Laurent, Christian (Lippincott Williams and Wilkins, 2013-04-15)
      In resource-limited countries, estimating CD4-specific incidence rates of mortality and morbidity among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) may help assess the effectiveness of care and treatment programmes, identify program weaknesses, and inform decisions.
    • Promoting adherence to antiretroviral therapy: the experience from a primary care setting in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

      Coetzee, D; Boulle, A; Hildebrand, K; Asselman, V; Van Cutsem, G; Goemaere, E; Infectious Disease Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. dcoetzee@phfm.uct.ac.za (2004-06)
      OBJECTIVE: To describe the approach used to promote adherence to antiretroviral therapy (ART) and to present the outcomes in the first primary care public sector ART project in South Africa. DESIGN: The study is a prospective open cohort, including all adult patients naive to previous ART who received antiretroviral treatment in Khayelitsha, from May 2001 to the end of 2002. Patients were followed until their most recent visit before 31 July 2003. METHODS: Plasma viral load was determined at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months after ART was initiated, and CD4 cell counts 6-monthly. Kaplan-Meier estimates were determined for the cumulative proportions of patients surviving, and patients with viral load suppression and viral rebound. RESULTS: A total of 287 patients were initiated on triple therapy. The probability of survival was 86.3% at 24 months. The median CD4 cell count gain was 288 cells/microliters at 24 months. Viral load was less than 400 copies/ml in 89.2, 84.2 and 69.7% of patients at 6, 12 and 24 months, respectively. The cumulative probability of viral rebound (two consecutive HIV-RNA measurements above 400 copies/ml) after achieving an HIV-RNA measurement below 400 copies/ml was 13.2% at 18 months. CONCLUSION: The study shows that, with a standard approach to patient preparation and strategies to enhance adherence, a cohort of patients on ART can be retained in a resource-limited setting in a developing country. A high proportion of patients achieved suppression of viral replication. The subsequent probability of viral rebound was low.
    • Providing antiretroviral care in conflict settings.

      Mills, Edward J; Ford, Nathan; Singh, Sonal; Eyawo, Oghenowede; BC Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, BC, Canada. emills@cfenet.ubc.ca (2009-11)
      There has been an historic expectation that delivering combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) to populations affected by violent conflict is untenable due to population movement and separation of drug supplies. There is now emerging evidence that cART provision can be successful in these populations. Using examples from Médecins Sans Frontières experience in a variety of African settings and also local nongovernmental organizations' experiences in northern Uganda, we examine novel approaches that have ensured retention in programs and adequate adherence. Emerging guidelines from United Nations bodies now support the expansion of cART in settings of conflict.
    • A qualitative investigation of adherence to nutritional therapy in malnourished adult AIDS patients in Kenya

      Dibari, Filippo; Bahwere, Paluku; Le Gall, Isabelle; Guerrero, Saul; Mwaniki, David; Seal, Andrew; Valid International, Oxford, UK; UCL Centre for International Health and Development, Institute of Child Health, London, UK; MSF-France, Nairobi, Kenya/Paris, France; Centre for Public Health, Kenya Medical Research Institute, KEMRI/CPHR, Nairobi, Kenya; Academy for Educational Development/Regional Office for Eastern and Central Africa, Nairobi, Kenya (Cambridge University Press, 2011-02-04)
      To understand factors affecting the compliance of malnourished, HIV-positive adults with a nutritional protocol using ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF; Plumpy'nut®).
    • Review of the safety, efficacy, and pharmacokinetics of elvitegravir with an emphasis on resource-limited settings

      Lee, Janice Soo Fern; Calmy, Alexandra; Andrieux-Meyer, Isabelle; Ford, Nathan; 1Médecins Sans Frontières; HIV/AIDS Unit, Infectious Disease Service, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town, South Africa (DovePress, 2012-01-11)
      Integrase inhibitors represent an important new class of antiretroviral drugs. Elvitegravir, the second available integrase inhibitor to be submitted for regulatory approval appears to be a promising once-daily agent when combined with other antiretroviral drugs. Elvitegravir has demonstrated good efficacy and safety, with minimal side effects and no specific requirements in terms of laboratory monitoring. In addition, elvitegravir is available as a fixed-dose combination. However, the drug requires boosting and this leads to a number of drug-drug interactions and necessary dose adjustment when dosing with certain drugs, including dose reduction in the presence of atazanavir, lopinavir, rifabutin, and ketoconazole, and dose increase for ethinyl estradiol when co-administered with boosted elvitegravir. The main advantage of elvitegravir lies in its potential to be administered as a once-daily, single pill. Limitations include dose adjustment requirements, a relatively low genetic barrier to resistance, high price, and lack of data for use in children. Clinical trials addressing specific challenges encountered in resources-limited settings should be encouraged.
    • Supervision, monitoring and evaluation of nationwide scale-up of antiretroviral therapy in Malawi

      Libamba, Edwin; Makombe, Simon; Mhango, Eustice; de Ascurra Teck, Olga; Limbambala, Eddie; Schouten, Erik J; Harries, Anthony D; Clinical HIV Unit, Ministry of Health, Lilongwe, Malawi; The Lighthouse Clinic, Lilongwe, Malawi; Médecins Sans Frontières–Belgium, Malawi Office, Blantyre, Malawi; World Health Organization Country Office, Lilongwe, Malawi; HIV Coordinator, Ministry of Health, Lilongwe, Malawi (2006-04-13)
      OBJECTIVE: To describe the supervision, monitoring and evaluation strategies used to assess the delivery of antiretroviral therapy during nationwide scale-up of treatment in Malawi. METHODS: In the first quarter of 2005, the HIV Unit of the Ministry of Health and its partners (the Lighthouse Clinic; Médecins Sans Frontières-Belgium, Thyolo district; and WHO's Country Office) undertook structured supervision and monitoring of all public sector health facilities in Malawi delivering antiretroviral therapy. FINDINGS: Data monitoring showed that by the end of 2004, there were 13,183 patients (5274 (40%) male, 12 527 (95%) adults) who had ever started antiretroviral therapy. Of patients who had ever started, 82% (10 761/13,183) were alive and taking antiretrovirals; 8% (1026/13,183) were dead; 8% (1039/13,183) had been lost to follow up; <1% (106/13,183) had stopped treatment; and 2% (251/13,183) had transferred to another facility. Of those alive and on antiretrovirals, 98% (7098/7258) were ambulatory; 85% (6174/7258) were fit to work; 10% (456/4687) had significant side effects; and, based on pill counts, 96% (6824/7114) had taken their treatment correctly. Mistakes in the registration and monitoring of patients were identified and corrected. Drug stocks were checked, and one potential drug stock-out was averted. As a result of the supervisory visits, by the end of March 2005 recruitment of patients to facilities scheduled to start delivering antiretroviral therapy had increased. CONCLUSION: This report demonstrates the importance of early supervision for sites that are starting to deliver antiretroviral therapy, and it shows the value of combining data collection with supervision. Making regular supervisory and monitoring visits to delivery sites are essential for tracking the national scale-up of delivery of antiretrovirals.
    • Symptomatic hyperlactatemia: lessons learned using a point-of-care device in a health care center- and nurse-based antiretroviral program in Rwanda.

      van Griensven, J; Atte, E; Reid, T (Published by: Infectious Diseases Society of America and University of Chicago Press, 2008-01-15)