• Do patents prevent access to drugs for HIV in developing countries?

      Boelaert, M; Lynen, L; Van Damme, W; Colebunders, R (2002-02-20)
    • Expanding HIV care in Africa: making men matter.

      Mills, E; Ford, N; Mugyenyi, P; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, ON, Canada V5Z4B4. emills@cfenet.ubc.ca (2009-07-25)
    • HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment.

      Goemaere, E; Ford, N; Benatar, S R (Elsevier, 2002-07-06)
    • Nutrition outcomes of HIV-infected malnourished adults treated with ready-to-use therapeutic food in sub-Saharan Africa: a longitudinal study.

      Ahoua, Laurence; Umutoni, Chantal; Huerga, Helena; Minetti, Andrea; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David M; Nicholas, Sarala; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Epicentre, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France. laurence_ahoua@yahoo.fr (BioMed Central home, 2011-01)
      Among people living with HIV/AIDS, nutritional support is increasingly recognized as a critical part of the essential package of care, especially for patients in sub-Saharan Africa. The objectives of the study were to evaluate the outcomes of HIV-positive malnourished adults treated with ready-to-use therapeutic food and to identify factors associated with nutrition programme failure.
    • Public health. Getting HIV treatment to the most people.

      Lynch, Sharonann; Ford, Nathan; van Cutsem, Gilles; Bygrave, Helen; Janssens, Bart; Decroo, Tom; Andrieux-Meyer, Isabelle; Roberts, Teri; Balkan, Suna; Casas, Esther; et al. (2012-07-20)
    • Rationing antiretroviral therapy in Africa--treating too few, too late.

      Ford, N; Mills, E; Calmy, A; Medical unit, Médecins sans Frontières, and School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa. (2009-04-30)
    • Registration problems for antiretrovirals in Africa.

      Ford, N; Darder, M; Médecins Sans Frontières, Khayelitsha, 7784 South Africa. Nathan.FORD@london.msf.org (Elsevier, 2006-03-11)
    • Sustainable HIV Treatment in Africa Through Viral-Load-Informed Differentiated Care

      Phillips, A; Shroufi, A; Vojnov, L; Cohn, J; Roberts, T; Ellman, T; Bonner, K; Rousseau, C; Garnett, G; Cambiano, V; et al. (Nature Publishing Group, 2015-12-03)
      There are inefficiencies in current approaches to monitoring patients on antiretroviral therapy in sub-Saharan Africa. Patients typically attend clinics every 1 to 3 months for clinical assessment. The clinic costs are comparable with the costs of the drugs themselves and CD4 counts are measured every 6 months, but patients are rarely switched to second-line therapies. To ensure sustainability of treatment programmes, a transition to more cost-effective delivery of antiretroviral therapy is needed. In contrast to the CD4 count, measurement of the level of HIV RNA in plasma (the viral load) provides a direct measure of the current treatment effect. Viral-load-informed differentiated care is a means of tailoring care so that those with suppressed viral load visit the clinic less frequently and attention is focussed on those with unsuppressed viral load to promote adherence and timely switching to a second-line regimen. The most feasible approach to measuring viral load in many countries is to collect dried blood spot samples for testing in regional laboratories; however, there have been concerns over the sensitivity and specificity of this approach to define treatment failure and the delay in returning results to the clinic. We use modelling to synthesize evidence and evaluate the cost-effectiveness of viral-load-informed differentiated care, accounting for limitations of dried blood sample testing. We find that viral-load-informed differentiated care using dried blood sample testing is cost-effective and is a recommended strategy for patient monitoring, although further empirical evidence as the approach is rolled out would be of value. We also explore the potential benefits of point-of-care viral load tests that may become available in the future.
    • Treatment failure and mortality factors in patients receiving second-line HIV therapy in resource-limited countries.

      Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Balkan, Suna; Arnould, Line; Brinkhof, Martin A W; Calmy, Alexandra; Epicentre, Médecins Sans Frontières 42-bis, Bd, 8 rue Saint Sabin, 75011 Paris, France. mar.pujades@epicentre.msf.org (2010-07-21)
      CONTEXT: Long-term antiretroviral therapy (ART) use in resource-limited countries leads to increasing numbers of patients with HIV taking second-line therapy. Limited access to further therapeutic options makes essential the evaluation of second-line regimen efficacy in these settings. OBJECTIVES: To investigate failure rates in patients receiving second-line therapy and factors associated with failure and death. DESIGN, SETTING, AND PARTICIPANTS: Multicohort study of 632 patients > 14 years old receiving second-line therapy for more than 6 months in 27 ART programs in Africa and Asia between January 2001 and October 2008. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: Clinical, immunological, virological, and immunovirological failure (first diagnosed episode of immunological or virological failure) rates, and mortality after 6 months of second-line therapy use. Sensitivity analyses were performed using alternative CD4 cell count thresholds for immunological and immunovirological definitions of failure and for cohort attrition instead of death. RESULTS: The 632 patients provided 740.7 person-years of follow-up; 119 (18.8%) met World Health Organization failure criteria after a median 11.9 months following the start of second-line therapy (interquartile range [IQR], 8.7-17.0 months), and 34 (5.4%) died after a median 15.1 months (IQR, 11.9-25.7 months). Failure rates were lower in those who changed 2 nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors (NRTIs) instead of 1 (179.2 vs 251.6 per 1000 person-years; incidence rate ratio [IRR], 0.64; 95% confidence interval [CI], 0.42-0.96), and higher in those with lowest adherence index (383.5 vs 176.0 per 1000 person-years; IRR, 3.14; 95% CI, 1.67-5.90 for < 80% vs > or = 95% [percentage adherent, as represented by percentage of appointments attended with no delay]). Failure rates increased with lower CD4 cell counts when second-line therapy was started, from 156.3 vs 96.2 per 1000 person-years; IRR, 1.59 (95% CI, 0.78-3.25) for 100 to 199/microL to 336.8 per 1000 person-years; IRR, 3.32 (95% CI, 1.81-6.08) for less than 50/microL vs 200/microL or higher; and decreased with time using second-line therapy, from 250.0 vs 123.2 per 1000 person-years; IRR, 1.90 (95% CI, 1.19-3.02) for 6 to 11 months to 212.0 per 1000 person-years; 1.71 (95% CI, 1.01-2.88) for 12 to 17 months vs 18 or more months. Mortality for those taking second-line therapy was lower in women (32.4 vs 68.3 per 1000 person-years; hazard ratio [HR], 0.45; 95% CI, 0.23-0.91); and higher in patients with treatment failure of any type (91.9 vs 28.1 per 1000 person-years; HR, 2.83; 95% CI, 1.38-5.80). Sensitivity analyses showed similar results. CONCLUSIONS: Among patients in Africa and Asia receiving second-line therapy for HIV, treatment failure was associated with low CD4 cell counts at second-line therapy start, use of suboptimal second-line regimens, and poor adherence. Mortality was associated with diagnosed treatment failure.
    • Treatment of AIDS in conflict-affected settings: a failure of imagination.

      Ellman, T; Culbert, H; Torres-Feced, V; Médecins Sans Frontières, London WC1R 5DJ, UK. tom.ellman@msf.org (Elsevier, 2008-02-14)