• A biregional survey and review of first-line treatment failure and second-line paediatric antiretroviral access and use in Asia and southern Africa

      Van Cutsem, G; Saphonn, V; Saramony, S; Vibol, U; Zhang, FJ; Han, N; Saghayam, S; Kurniati, N; Muktiarti, D; Fong, SM; Thien, M; Nik Yusoff, NK; Hai, LC; Razali, K; TREAT Asia/amfAR - The Foundation for AIDS Research, Bangkok, Thailand. annette.sohn@treatasia.org (BioMed Central, 2011-04-08)
      To better understand the need for paediatric second-line antiretroviral therapy (ART), an ART management survey and a cross-sectional analysis of second-line ART use were conducted in the TREAT Asia Paediatric HIV Observational Database and the IeDEA Southern Africa (International Epidemiologic Databases to Evaluate AIDS) regional cohorts.
    • Early mortality and loss to follow-up in HIV-infected children starting antiretroviral therapy in Southern Africa.

      Fenner, Lukas; Brinkhof, Martin W G; Keiser, Olivia; Weigel, Ralf; Cornell, Morna; Moultrie, Harry; Prozesky, Hans; Technau, Karl; Eley, Brian; Vaz, Paula; Pascoe, Margaret; Giddy, Janet; Van Cutsem, Gilles; Wood, Robin; Egger, Matthias; Davies, Mary-Ann; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland. lfenner@ispm.unibe.ch (2010-08-15)
      BACKGROUND: Many HIV-infected children in Southern Africa have been started on antiretroviral therapy (ART), but loss to follow up (LTFU) can be substantial. We analyzed mortality in children retained in care and in all children starting ART, taking LTFU into account. PATIENTS AND METHODS: Children who started ART before the age of 16 years in 10 ART programs in South Africa, Malawi, Mozambique, and Zimbabwe were included. Risk factors for death in the first year of ART were identified in Weibull models. A meta-analytic approach was used to estimate cumulative mortality at 1 year. RESULTS: Eight thousand two hundred twenty-five children (median age 49 months, median CD4 cell percent 11.6%) were included; 391 (4.8%) died and 523 (7.0%) were LTFU in the first year. Mortality at 1 year was 4.5% [95% confidence interval (CI): 2.8% to 7.4%] in children remaining in care, but 8.7% (5.4% to 12.1%) at the program level, after taking mortality in children and LTFU into account. Factors associated with mortality in children remaining in care included age [adjusted hazard ratio (HR) 0.37; 95% CI: 0.25 to 0.54 comparing > or =120 months with <18 months], CD4 cell percent (HR: 0.56; 95% CI: 0.39 to 0.78 comparing > or =20% with <10%), and clinical stage (HR: 0.12; 95% CI: 0.03 to 0.45 comparing World Health Organization stage I with III/IV). CONCLUSIONS: In children starting ART and remaining in care in Southern Africa mortality at 1 year is <5% but almost twice as high at the program level, when taking LTFU into account. Age, CD4 percentage, and clinical stage are important predictors of mortality at the individual level.
    • Variability of Growth in Children Starting Antiretroviral Treatment in Southern Africa

      Gsponer, Thomas; Weigel, Ralf; Davies, Mary-Ann; Bolton, Carolyn; Moultrie, Harry; Vaz, Paula; Rabie, Helena; Technau, Karl; Ndirangu, James; Eley, Brian; Garone, Daniela; Wellington, Maureen; Giddy, Janet; Ehmer, Jochen; Egger, Matthias; Keiser, Olivia; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM), University of Bern, Finkenhubelweg 11, CH-3012 Bern, Switzerland. (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2012-10)
      Poor growth is an indication for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and a criterion for treatment failure. We examined variability in growth response to ART in 12 programs in Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and South Africa.
    • Viral Load Monitoring of Antiretroviral Therapy, cohort viral load and HIV transmission in Southern Africa: A Mathematical Modelling Analysis

      Estill, Janne; Aubrière, Cindy; Egger, Matthias; Johnson, Leigh; Wood, Robin; Garone, Daniela; Gsponer, Thomas; Wandeler, Gilles; Boulle, Andrew; Davies, Mary-Ann; Hallett, Timothy B; Keiser, Olivia; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, University of Bern, Switzerland. (2012-03-20)
      In low-income settings, treatment failure is often identified using CD4 cell count monitoring. Consequently, patients remain on a failing regimen, resulting in a higher risk of transmission. We investigated the benefit of routine viral load monitoring for reducing HIV transmission.
    • Viral Load Versus CD4⁺ Monitoring and 5-Year Outcomes of Antiretroviral Therapy in HIV-Positive Children in Southern Africa: a Cohort-Based Modelling Study

      Salazar-Vizcaya, L; Keiser, O; Karl, T; Davies, MA; Haas, Andreas D; Blaser, N; Cox, V; Eley, B; Rabie, H; Moultrie, H; Giddy, J; Wood, R; Egger, M; Estill, J (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-10-23)
      Many paediatric antiretroviral therapy (ART) programmes in Southern Africa rely on CD4⁺ to monitor ART. We assessed the benefit of replacing CD4⁺ by viral load monitoring.