• High rates of active hepatitis B and C co-infections in HIV-1 infected Cameroonian adults initiating antiretroviral therapy

      Laurent, C; Bourgeois, A; Mpoudi-Ngolé, E; Kouanfack, C; Ciaffi, L; Nkoué, N; Mougnutou, R; Calmy, A; Koulla-Shiro, S; Ducos, J; et al. (2009-07-29)
      OBJECTIVES: To investigate the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Cameroon. METHODS: Baseline blood samples from 169 patients were tested retrospectively for hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc), anti-HCV and - if HBsAg or anti-HCV result was positive or indeterminate - for HBV DNA or HCV RNA, respectively, using the Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan quantitative assay (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany). RESULTS: HBV DNA was detected in 14 of the 18 patients with positive or indeterminate HBsAg results [8.3% of the total study population, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.6-13.5]. The median HBV viral load was 2.47 x 10(7) IU/mL [interquartile range (IQR) 3680-1.59 x 10(8); range 270 to >2.2 x 10(8)]. Twenty-one patients (12.4%, 95% CI 7.9-18.4) were found with HCV RNA (all with positive HCV serology). The median HCV viral load was 928 000 IU/mL (IQR 178 400-2.06 x 10(6); range 640-5.5 x 10(6)). No patient was co-infected with HBV and HCV. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection was associated with greater age [>or=45 years vs. <45 years, odds ratio (OR) 11.89, 95% CI 3.49-40.55, P<0.001] and abnormal serum alanine aminotransferase level [>or=1.25 x upper limit of normal (ULN) vs. <1.25 x ULN, OR 7.81, 95% CI 1.54-39.66, P=0.01]; HBV co-infection was associated with abnormal serum aspartate aminotransferase level (OR 4.33, 95% CI 1.32-14.17, P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: These high rates of active HBV and HCV co-infections in HIV-positive Cameroonian patients requiring antiretroviral therapy underline the need to promote: (i) screening for HBV and HCV before treatment initiation; (ii) accessibility to tenofovir (especially in HBV-endemic African countries); and (iii) accessibility to treatment for HBV and HCV infections.
    • Resistance profiles after different periods of exposure to a first-line antiretroviral regimen in a Cameroonian cohort of HIV type-1-infected patients.

      Soria, A; Porten, K; Fampou-Toundji, J; Galli, L; Mougnutou, R; Buard, V; Kfutwah, A; Vessière, A; Rousset, D; Teck, R; et al. (2009-08)
      BACKGROUND: The lack of HIV type-1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) monitoring in resource-limited settings might favour the accumulation of resistance mutations and thus hamper second-line treatment efficacy. We investigated the factors associated with resistance after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the absence of virological monitoring. METHODS: Cross-sectional VL sampling of HIV-1-infected patients receiving first-line ART (nevirapine or efavirenz plus stavudine or zidovudine plus lamivudine) was carried out; those with a detectable VL were genotyped. RESULTS: Of the 573 patients undergoing VL sampling, 84 were genotyped. The mean number of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutations increased with the duration of ART exposure (P=0.02). Multivariable analysis showed that patients with a CD4+ T-cell count < or =50 cells/mm(3) at ART initiation (baseline) had a higher mean number of both NRTI and non-NRTI (NNRTI) mutations than those with a baseline CD4+ T-cell count >50 cells/mm(3) (2.10 versus 0.56; P<0.0001; and 1.65 versus 0.76; P=0.005, respectively). A baseline CD4+ T-cell count < or =50 cells/mm(3) predicted > or =1 NRTI mutation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 7.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.20-32.14), > or =1 NNRTI mutation (AOR 4.25, 95% CI 1.36-15.48), > or =1 thymidine analogue mutation (AOR 8.45, 95% CI 2.16-40.16) and resistance to didanosine (AOR 6.36, 95% CI 1.49-32.29) and etravirine (AOR 4.72, 95% CI 1.53-15.70). CONCLUSIONS: Without VL monitoring, the risk of drug resistance increases with the duration of ART and is associated with lower CD4+ T-cell counts at ART initiation. These data might help define strategies to preserve second-line treatment options in resource-limited settings.