• AIDS: patent rights versus patient's rights.

      Chirac, P; von Schoen-Angerer, T; Kasper, T; Ford, N; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France. (Elsevier, 2000-08-05)
    • Colombia: The Winner Takes All.

      Veeken, H; Medecins Sans Frontières, PO Box 10014, 1001 EA Amsterdam, Netherlands. hansvveeken@amsterdam.msf.org (Published by: BMJ Publishing Group Ltd, 1998-12-12)
    • Cost and cost-effectiveness of switching from d4T or AZT to a TDF-based first-line regimen in a resource-limited setting in rural Lesotho

      Jouquet, Guillaume; Bygrave, Helen; Kranzer, Katharina; Ford, Nathan; Gadot, Laurent; Lee, Janice; Hilderbrand, Katherine; Goemaere, Eric; Vlahakis, Natalie; Trivino, Laura; et al. (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-11-01)
      Latest World Health Organization guidelines recommend shifting away from Stavudine (d4T)-based regimens due to severe side effects. However, widespread replacement of d4T by Tenofovir (TDF) or Zidovudine (AZT) is hampered by cost concerns.
    • Crunch time for funding of universal access to antiretroviral treatment for people with HIV infection

      Maher, D; von Schoen-Angerer, T; Cohn, J; MRC⁄ UVRI Uganda Research Unit on AIDS, Entebbe, Uganda; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, UK; Medecins sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Division of Infectious Diseases, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, USA (Wiley-Blackwell, 2011-07-15)
    • Cytomegalovirus retinitis: the neglected disease of the AIDS pandemic.

      Heiden, D; Ford, N; Wilson, D; Rodriguez, W; Margolis, T; Janssens, B; Bedelu, M; Tun, N; Goemaere, E; Saranchuk, P; et al. (PLoS, 2007-12)
    • Do patents prevent access to drugs for HIV in developing countries?

      Boelaert, M; Lynen, L; Van Damme, W; Colebunders, R (2002-02-20)
    • Evaluation of a systematic substitution of zidovudine for stavudine-based HAART in a program setting in rural Cambodia

      Isaakidis, P; Raguenaud, M E; Phe, T; Khim, S; Kuoch, S; Khem, S; Reid, T; Arnould, L; Médecins Sans Frontières OCB, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Chronic Diseases Clinic, Donkeo Provincial Referral Hospital, Ministry of Health, Takeo, Cambodia; Médecins Sans Frontières OCB, Brussels, Belgium (2008-09-01)
      OBJECTIVE
    • Generic Fixed-Dose Combination Antiretroviral Treatment in Resource-Poor Settings: Multicentric Observational Cohort

      Calmy, A; Pinoges, L; Szumilin, E; Zachariah, R; Ford, N; Ferradini, L; MSF, Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, 78 rue de Lausanne, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland. acalmy@stvincents.com.au (2006-05-12)
      BACKGROUND: The use fixed-dose combination (FDC) is a critical tool in improving HAART. Studies on the effectiveness of combined lamivudine, stavudine and nevirapine (3TC/d4T/NVP) are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To analyse 6861 patients in a large observational cohort from 21 Médecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) HIV/AIDS programmes taking 3TC/d4T/NVP, with subcohort analyses of patients at 12 and 18 months of treatment. METHODS: Survival was analysed using Kaplan-Meier method and factors associated with progression to death with Cox proportional hazard ratio. RESULTS: Median baseline CD4 cell count at initiating of FDC was 89 cells/microl [interquartile range (IQR), 33-158]. The median follow-up time was 4.1 months (IQR, 1.9-7.3). The incidence rate of death during follow-up was 14.2/100 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.8-14.5]. Estimates of survival (excluding those lost to follow-up) were 0.93 (95% CI, 92-94) at 6 months (n = 2,231) and 0.90 (95% CI, 89-91) at 12 months (n = 472). Using a Cox model, the following factors were associated with death: male gender, symptomatic infection, body mass index < 18 kg/m and CD4 cell count 15-50 cells/microl or < 15 cells/microl. Subcohort analysis of 655 patients after 1 year of follow-up (M12 FDC cohort) revealed that 77% remained on HAART, 91% of these still on the FDC regimen; 5% discontinued the FDC because of drug intolerance. At 18 months, 77% of the patients remained on HAART. CONCLUSIONS: Positive outcomes for d4T/3TC/NVP are reported for up to 18 months in terms of efficacy and safety.
    • Highly Active Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Poor Settings: The Experience of Médecins Sans Frontières.

      Tassie, J M; Szumilin, E; Calmy, A; Goemaere, E; Epicentre, Paris, France. (2003-09-05)
      We describe the short-term results of highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART) in seven projects in low and middle income countries. A total of 743 adults were included, and clinical, immunological and virological responses were analysed. At 6 months, outcomes were similar to those observed in western countries, and the probability of remaining on treatment was 94%. The challenge now is to extend access to HAART to the millions in urgent need.
    • HIV drug resistance.

      Calmy, A; Pascual, F; Ford, N (Massachusetts Medical Society, 2004-06-24)
    • HIV Viral Load Monitoring in Resource-Limited Regions: Optional or Necessary?

      Calmy, A; Ford, N; Hirschel, B; Reynolds, S; Lynen, L; Goemaere, E; Garcia de la Vega, F; Perrin, L; Rodriguez, W; Medecins sans Frontieres, Access to Medicines Campaign, Geneva, 1211, Switzerland. acalmy@gmail.com (Published by: Infectious Diseases Society of America, 2007-01-01)
      Although it is a standard practice in high-income countries, determination of the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load is not recommended in developing countries because of the costs and technical constraints. As more and more countries establish capacity to provide second-line therapy, and as costs and technological constraints associated with viral load testing decrease, the question of whether determination of the viral load is necessary deserves attention. Viral load testing could increase in importance as a guide for clinical decisions on when to switch to second-line treatment and on how to optimize the duration of the first-line treatment regimen. In addition, the viral load is a particularly useful tool for monitoring adherence to treatment, performing sentinel surveillance, and diagnosing HIV infection in children aged <18 months. Rather than considering viral load data to be an unaffordable luxury, efforts should be made to ensure that viral load testing becomes affordable, simple, and easy to use in resource-limited settings.
    • HIV/AIDS prevention and treatment.

      Goemaere, E; Ford, N; Benatar, S R (Elsevier, 2002-07-06)
    • How developing world concerns need to be part of drug development plans: A case study of four emerging antiretrovirals

      van Roey, J; von Schoen-Angerer, T; Ford, N; Calmy, A; Médecins Sans Frontières, Campaign for Access to Essential Medecins, Geneva, Switzerland; Médecins Sans Frontières, Khayelitsha, South Africa; Geneva Teaching Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland (2008-07)
      Clinical trials are usually designed to meet registration requirements in developed countries, and do not always address key concerns for use in developing countries. Four late-stage investigational new drugs - rilpivirine, etravirine, raltegravir and maraviroc - show potential to improve antiretroviral therapy. However, a number of issues could limit their use in developing countries, including dose selection, treatment strategy, combination with other drugs, use in specific populations and reliance on expensive tests. Key research questions relevant for developing countries need to be answered early in the drug development process to ensure maximum benefit for the majority.
    • Life expectancy of persons receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries: a cohort analysis from Uganda

      Mills, Edward J; Bakanda, Celestin; Birungi, Josephine; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Cooper, Curtis L; Nachega, Jean B; Dybul, Mark; Hogg, Robert S; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; The AIDS Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda; British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (American College of Physicians, 2011-07-18)
      Little is known about the effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on life expectancy in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • The marriage of science and optimized HIV care in resource-limited settings

      Calmy, A; Pizzocolo, C; Pizarro, L; Brücker, G; Murphy, R; Katlama, C; Strategies in Resource-Limited Settings Working Group; Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva; Geneva University, Geneva, Switzerland; Solidarité Théapeutique et Initiatives contre le Sida, Paris; Université Paris 11, Faculté de Médicine Paris-Sud, Le Kremlin-Bicêtre, Paris; Université Pierre et Marie Curie, Paris, France (2008-11-12)
    • Monitoring the response to antiretroviral therapy in resource-poor settings: the Malawi model.

      Harries, A D; Gomani, P; Teck, R; de Teck, O; Bakali, E; Zachariah, R; Libamba, E; Mwansambo, A; Salaniponi, F; Mpazanje, R; et al. (2004-12)
      With assistance from the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis and Malaria (GFATM), Malawi is scaling-up the delivery of antiretroviral (ARV) therapy to HIV-positive eligible patients. The country has developed National ARV Treatment Guidelines, which emphasize a structured and standardized approach for all aspects of ARV delivery, including monitoring and evaluation. Using the successful DOTS model adapted by National TB Control Programmes throughout the world, Malawi has developed a system of quarterly ARV cohort and cumulative ARV quarterly analyses. Thyolo district, in the southern region of Malawi, has been using this system since April 2003. This paper describes the standardized ARV treatment regimens and the treatment outcomes used in Thyolo to assess the impact of treatment, the registration and monitoring systems and how the cohort analyses are carried out. Data are presented for case registration and treatment outcome for the first quarterly cohort (April to June) and the combined cohorts (April to June and July to September). Such quarterly analyses may be useful for districts and Ministries of Health in assessing ARV delivery, although the burden of work involved in calculating the numbers may become large once ARV delivery systems have been established for several years.
    • Outcomes after two years of providing antiretroviral treatment in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

      Coetzee, D; Hildebrand, K; Boulle, A; Maartens, G; Louis, F; Labatala, V; Reuter, H; Ntwana, N; Goemaere, E; Infectious Disease Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7925, South Africa. (2004-04-09)
      BACKGROUND: A community-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme was established in 2001 in a South African township to explore the operational issues involved in providing ART in the public sector in resource-limited settings and demonstrate the feasibility of such a service. METHODS: Data was analysed on a cohort of patients with symptomatic HIV disease and a CD4 lymphocyte count < 200 x 10 cells/l. The programme used standardized protocols (using generic medicines whenever possible), a team-approach to clinical care and a patient-centred approach to promote adherence. RESULTS: Two-hundred and eighty-seven adults naive to prior ART were followed for a median duration of 13.9 months. The median CD4 lymphocyte count was 43 x 10 cells/l at initiation of treatment, and the mean log10 HIV RNA was 5.18 copies/ml. The HIV RNA level was undetectable (< 400 copies/ml) in 88.1, 89.2, 84.2, 75.0 and 69.7% of patients at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months respectively. The cumulative probability of remaining alive was 86.3% at 24 months on treatment for all patients, 91.4% for those with a baseline CD4 lymphocyte count > or =50 x 10 cells/l, and 81.8% for those with a baseline CD4 lymphocyte count < 50 x 10 cells/l. The cumulative probability of changing a single antiretroviral drug by 24 months was 15.1% due to adverse events or contraindications, and 8.4% due to adverse events alone. CONCLUSIONS: ART can be provided in resource-limited settings with good patient retention and clinical outcomes. With responsible implementation, ART is a key component of a comprehensive response to the epidemic in those communities most affected by HIV.
    • Patient needs and point-of-care requirements for HIV load testing in resource-limited settings

      Usdin, Martine; Guillerm, Martine; Calmy, Alexandra; Medecins Sans Frontieres Access Campaign, Paris, France; University of Liverpool School of Public Health, Liverpool, United Kingdom; Department of Infectious Diseases, Geneva University Hospital, Geneva, Switzerland (2010-04-15)
      Medecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) is an international, independent medical nongovernmental organization. One way in which MSF acts to improve patient care is to assist in the identification and development of adapted and appropriate tools for use in resource-limited settings. One strategy to achieve this goal is through active collaborations with scientists and developers, to make some of the field needs known and to help define the medical strategy behind the implementation of new diagnostic tests. Tests used in the field need to be effective in often extreme conditions and must also deliver high-quality, reliable results that can be used in the local context. In this article, we discuss some patient and health care provider needs for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) load measurement in resource-limited settings. This is just one of the areas in which effective, quality tools are desperately needed, not only by MSF and other international nongovernmental organizations, but also by many other health service providers. We hope that, by clearly defining the needs of patients in MSF clinics-as well as we can assess this-and by explaining why these tools are needed, how they should perform, and how their results can be integrated into a program, we will encourage the development of such tools and hasten their implementation in areas where they are so urgently needed.
    • Rationing antiretroviral therapy in Africa--treating too few, too late.

      Ford, N; Mills, E; Calmy, A; Medical unit, Médecins sans Frontières, and School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, South Africa. (2009-04-30)
    • Registration problems for antiretrovirals in Africa.

      Ford, N; Darder, M; Médecins Sans Frontières, Khayelitsha, 7784 South Africa. Nathan.FORD@london.msf.org (Elsevier, 2006-03-11)