• Association between older age and adverse outcomes on antiretroviral therapy: a cohort analysis of programme data from nine countries.

      Greig, Jane; Casas, Esther C; O'Brien, Daniel P; Mills, Edward J; Ford, Nathan; Médecins Sans Frontières, London, UK. jane.greig@london.msf.org (2012-07-31)
      Recent studies have highlighted the increased risk of adverse outcomes among older patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART). We report on the associations between older age and adverse outcomes in HIV/AIDS antiretroviral programmes across 17 programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Correcting mortality for loss to follow-up: a nomogram applied to antiretroviral treatment programmes in sub-Saharan Africa.

      Egger, Matthias; Spycher, Ben D; Sidle, John; Weigel, Ralf; Geng, Elvin H; Fox, Matthew P; MacPhail, Patrick; van Cutsem, Gilles; Messou, Eugène; Wood, Robin; et al. (2011-01)
      The World Health Organization estimates that in sub-Saharan Africa about 4 million HIV-infected patients had started antiretroviral therapy (ART) by the end of 2008. Loss of patients to follow-up and care is an important problem for treatment programmes in this region. As mortality is high in these patients compared to patients remaining in care, ART programmes with high rates of loss to follow-up may substantially underestimate mortality of all patients starting ART.
    • Earlier versus later start of antiretroviral therapy in HIV-infected adults with tuberculosis.

      Blanc, F-X; Sok, T; Laureillard, D; Borand, L; Rekacewicz, C; Nerrienet, E; Madec, Y; Marcy, O; Chan, S; Prak, N; et al. (2011-10-20)
      Tuberculosis remains an important cause of death among patients infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Robust data are lacking with regard to the timing for the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in relation to the start of antituberculosis therapy.
    • Effectiveness of highly active antiretroviral therapy in HIV-positive children: evaluation at 12 months in a routine program in Cambodia.

      Janssens, B; Raleigh, B; Soeung, S; Akao, K; Te, V; Gupta, J; Vun, M; Ford, N; Nouhin, J; Nerrienet, E; et al. (2007-11)
      OBJECTIVE: Increasing access to highly active antiretroviral therapy to reach all those in need in developing countries (scale up) is slowly expanding to HIV-positive children, but documented experience remains limited. We aimed to describe the clinical, immunologic, and virologic outcomes of pediatric patients with >12 months of highly active antiretroviral therapy in 2 routine programs in Cambodia. METHODS: Between June 2003 and March 2005, 212 children who were younger than 13 years started highly active antiretroviral therapy. Most patients started a standard first-line regimen of lamivudine, stavudine, and nevirapine, using split adult fixed-dosage combinations. CD4 percentage and body weight were monitored routinely. A cross-sectional virologic analysis was conducted in January 2006; genotype resistance testing was performed for patients with a detectable viral load. RESULTS: Mean age of the subjects was 6 years. Median CD4 percentage at baseline was 6. Survival was 92% at 12 months and 91% at 24 months; 13 patients died, and 4 were lost to follow-up. A total of 81% of all patients had an undetectable viral load. Among the patients with a detectable viral load, most mutations were associated with resistance to lamivudine and non-nucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor drugs. Five patients had developed extensive antiretroviral resistance. Being an orphan was found to be a predictor of virologic failure. CONCLUSIONS: This study provides additional evidence of the effectiveness of integrating HIV/AIDS care with highly active antiretroviral therapy for children in a routine setting, with good virologic suppression and immunologic recovery achieved by using split adult fixed-dosage combinations. Viral load monitoring and HIV genotyping are valuable tools for the clinical follow-up of the patients. Orphans should receive careful follow-up and extra support.
    • Immunovirological response to combined antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance patterns in children: 1- and 2-year outcomes in rural Uganda.

      Ahoua, Laurence; Guenther, Gunar; Rouzioux, Christine; Pinoges, Loretxu; Anguzu, Paul; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David M; Olaro, Charles; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; et al. (BioMed Central, 2011-07-26)
      Children living with HIV continue to be in urgent need of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART). Strategies to scale up and improve pediatric HIV care in resource-poor regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, require further research from these settings. We describe treatment outcomes in children treated in rural Uganda after 1 and 2 years of ART start.
    • Low uptake of antiretroviral therapy after admission with human immunodeficiency virus and tuberculosis in KwaZulu-Natal, South Africa.

      Murphy, R A; Sunpath, H; Taha, B; Kappagoda, S; Maphasa, K T M; Kuritzkes, D R; Smeaton, L; Doctors Without Borders USA, New York, USA; McCord Hospital, South Africa; Harvard Medical School, Massachusetts, USA; Division of Infectious Disease and Geographic Medicine, California, USA; Zoe-Life, South Africa; Section of Retroviral Therapeutics, Massachusetts, USA; Centre for Biostatistics in AIDS Research, Massachusetts, USA (2010-07-01)
      A prospective cohort study was conducted among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected in-patients with tuberculosis (TB) or other opportunistic infections (OIs) in South Africa to estimate subsequent antiretroviral therapy (ART) uptake and survival.
    • Outcomes after two years of providing antiretroviral treatment in Khayelitsha, South Africa.

      Coetzee, D; Hildebrand, K; Boulle, A; Maartens, G; Louis, F; Labatala, V; Reuter, H; Ntwana, N; Goemaere, E; Infectious Disease Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Anzio Road, Observatory 7925, South Africa. (2004-04-09)
      BACKGROUND: A community-based antiretroviral therapy (ART) programme was established in 2001 in a South African township to explore the operational issues involved in providing ART in the public sector in resource-limited settings and demonstrate the feasibility of such a service. METHODS: Data was analysed on a cohort of patients with symptomatic HIV disease and a CD4 lymphocyte count < 200 x 10 cells/l. The programme used standardized protocols (using generic medicines whenever possible), a team-approach to clinical care and a patient-centred approach to promote adherence. RESULTS: Two-hundred and eighty-seven adults naive to prior ART were followed for a median duration of 13.9 months. The median CD4 lymphocyte count was 43 x 10 cells/l at initiation of treatment, and the mean log10 HIV RNA was 5.18 copies/ml. The HIV RNA level was undetectable (< 400 copies/ml) in 88.1, 89.2, 84.2, 75.0 and 69.7% of patients at 3, 6, 12, 18 and 24 months respectively. The cumulative probability of remaining alive was 86.3% at 24 months on treatment for all patients, 91.4% for those with a baseline CD4 lymphocyte count > or =50 x 10 cells/l, and 81.8% for those with a baseline CD4 lymphocyte count < 50 x 10 cells/l. The cumulative probability of changing a single antiretroviral drug by 24 months was 15.1% due to adverse events or contraindications, and 8.4% due to adverse events alone. CONCLUSIONS: ART can be provided in resource-limited settings with good patient retention and clinical outcomes. With responsible implementation, ART is a key component of a comprehensive response to the epidemic in those communities most affected by HIV.
    • Outcomes and safety of concomitant nevirapine and rifampicin treatment under programme conditions in Malawi.

      Moses, M; Zachariah, R; Tayler-Smith, K; Misinde, D; Foncha, C; Manzi, M; Bauerfeind, A; Mwagomba, B; Kwanjana, J; Harries, A D; et al. (2010-02)
      SETTING: Thyolo District Hospital, rural Malawi. OBJECTIVES: To report on 1) clinical, immunological and virological outcomes and 2) safety among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with tuberculosis (TB) who received concurrent nevirapine (NVP) and rifampicin (RMP) based treatment. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Analysis of programme data, June-December 2007. RESULTS: Of a total of 156 HIV-infected TB patients who started NVP-based antiretroviral treatment, 136 (87%) completed TB treatment successfully, 16 (10%) died and 5 (4%) were transferred out. Mean body weight and CD4 gain (adults) were respectively 4.4 kg (95%CI 3.3-5.4) and 140 cells/mm(3) (95%CI 117-162). Seventy-four per cent of patients who completed TB treatment and had a viral load performed (n = 74) had undetectable levels (<50 copies/ml), while 17 (22%) had a viral load of 50-1000 copies/ml. Hepatotoxicity was present in 2 (1.3%) patients at baseline. Two patients developed Grade 2 and one developed Grade 3 alanine transaminase enzyme elevations during TB treatment (incidence rate per 10 years of follow-up 4.2, 95%CI 1.4-13.1). There were no reported deaths linked to hepatotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS: In a rural district in Malawi, concomitant NVP and RMP treatment is associated with good TB treatment outcomes and appears safe. Further follow-up of patients would be useful to ascertain the longer-term effects of this concurrent treatment.
    • Similar mortality and reduced loss to follow-up in integrated compared with vertical programs providing antiretroviral treatment in sub-saharan Africa.

      Greig, Jane; O'Brien, Daniel P; Ford, Nathan; Spelman, Tim; Sabapathy, Kalpana; Shanks, Leslie; Manson Unit, Médecins sans Frontières, Saffron Hill, London, UK. jane.greig@london.msf.org (2012-04-15)
      Vertical HIV programs have achieved good results but may not be feasible or appropriate in many resource-limited settings. Médecins sans Frontières has treated HIV in vertical programs since 2000 and over time integrated HIV treatment into general health care services using simplified protocols. We analyzed the survival probability among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from 2003 to 2010 in integrated versus vertical programs in 9 countries in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Substitutions due to antiretroviral toxicity or contraindication in the first 3 years of antiretroviral therapy in a large South African cohort.

      Boulle, A; Orrell, C; Kaplan, R; Van Cutsem, G; McNally, M; Hilderbrand, K; Myer, L; Egger, M; Coetzee, D; Maartens, G; et al. (International Medical Press, 2007)
      INTRODUCTION: The patterns and reasons for antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug substitutions are poorly described in resource-limited settings. METHODS: Time to and reason for drug substitution were recorded in treatment-naive adults receiving ART in two primary care treatment programmes in Cape Town. The cumulative proportion of patients having therapy changed because of toxicity was described for each drug, and associations with these changes were explored in multivariate models. RESULTS: Analysis included 2,679 individuals followed for a median of 11 months. Median CD4+ T-cell count at baseline was 85 cells/microl. Mean weight was 59 kg, mean age was 32 years and 71% were women. All started non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based ART (60% on efavrienz) and 75% started on stavudine (d4T). After 3 years, 75% remained in care on-site, of whom 72% remained on their initial regimen. Substitutions due to toxicity of nevirapine (8% by 3 years), efavirenz (2%) and zidovudine (8%) occurred early. Substitutions on d4T occurred in 21% of patients by 3 years, due to symptomatic hyperlactataemia (5%), lipodystrophy (9%) or peripheral neuropathy (6%), and continued to accumulate over time. Those at greatest risk of hyperlactataemia or lipodystrophy were women on ART > or =6 months, weighing > or =75 kg at baseline. DISCUSSION: A high proportion of adult patients are able to tolerate their initial ART regimen for up to 3 years. In most instances treatment-limiting toxicities occur early, but continue to accumulate over time in patients on d4T. Whilst awaiting other treatment options, the risks of known toxicities could be minimized through early identification of patients at the highest risk.
    • Treatment outcomes from the largest antiretroviral treatment program in Myanmar (Burma): a cohort analysis of retention after scale-up.

      Sabapathy, Kalpana; Ford, Nathan; Chan, Khin Nyein; Kyaw, Moe Kyaw; Elema, Riekje; Smithuis, Frank; Floyd, Sian; Imperial College London, London, United Kingdom; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Amsterdam, The Netherlands, Medecins Sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Medecisn Sans Frontieres, Yangon, Myanmar; Medical Action Myanmar, Yangon, Myanmar; London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, London, United Kingdom. (2012-06-01)
      Antiretroviral treatment (ART) coverage in Myanmar is well below average. This study describes retention and baseline predictors of prognosis from the largest ART program in the country.
    • Variability of Growth in Children Starting Antiretroviral Treatment in Southern Africa

      Gsponer, Thomas; Weigel, Ralf; Davies, Mary-Ann; Bolton, Carolyn; Moultrie, Harry; Vaz, Paula; Rabie, Helena; Technau, Karl; Ndirangu, James; Eley, Brian; et al. (American Academy of Pediatrics, 2012-10)
      Poor growth is an indication for antiretroviral therapy (ART) and a criterion for treatment failure. We examined variability in growth response to ART in 12 programs in Malawi, Zambia, Zimbabwe, Mozambique, and South Africa.
    • Viral Load Monitoring of Antiretroviral Therapy, cohort viral load and HIV transmission in Southern Africa: A Mathematical Modelling Analysis

      Estill, Janne; Aubrière, Cindy; Egger, Matthias; Johnson, Leigh; Wood, Robin; Garone, Daniela; Gsponer, Thomas; Wandeler, Gilles; Boulle, Andrew; Davies, Mary-Ann; et al. (2012-03-20)
      In low-income settings, treatment failure is often identified using CD4 cell count monitoring. Consequently, patients remain on a failing regimen, resulting in a higher risk of transmission. We investigated the benefit of routine viral load monitoring for reducing HIV transmission.
    • Voluntary Counselling, HIV Testing and Adjunctive Cotrimoxazole Reduces Mortality in Tuberculosis Patients in Thyolo, Malawi.

      Zachariah, R; Spielmann M P; Chinji, C; Gomani, P; Arendt, V; Hargreaves, N J; Salaniponi, F M L; Harries, A D; Medecins Sans Frontieres-Luxembourg, Blantyre, Malawi. zachariah@internet.Lu (2003-05-02)
      OBJECTIVES: To assess the feasibility and effectiveness of voluntary counselling, HIV testing and adjunctive cotrimoxazole in reducing mortality in a cohort of tuberculosis (TB) patients registered under routine programme conditions in a rural district of Malawi. DESIGN: 'Before' and 'after' cohort study using historical controls. METHODS: Between 1 July 1999 and 30 June 2000 all TB patients were started on standardized anti-TB treatment, and offered voluntary counselling and HIV testing (VCT). Those found to be HIV-positive were offered cotrimoxazole at a dose of 480 mg twice daily, provided there were no contraindications. Side-effects were monitored clinically. End-of-treatment outcomes in this cohort (intervention group) were compared with a cohort registered between 1 July 1998 and 30 June 1999 in whom VCT and cotrimoxazole was not offered (control group). FINDINGS: A total of 1986 patients was registered in the study: 1061 in the intervention group and 925 in the control cohort. In the intervention group, 1019 (96%) patients were counselled pre-test, 964 (91%) underwent HIV testing and 938 (88%) were counselled post-test. The overall HIV-seroprevalence rate was 77%. A total of 693 patients were given cotrimoxazole of whom 14 (2%) manifested minor dermatological reactions. The adjusted relative risk of death in the intervention group compared with the control group was 0.81 (P < 0.001). The number needed to treat with VCT and adjunctive cotrimoxazole to prevent one death during anti-TB treatment was 12.5. INTERPRETATION: This study shows that VCT and adjunctive cotrimoxazole is feasible, safe and reduces mortality rates in TB patients under routine programme conditions.