• Cascade of HIV Care and Population Biral Suppression in a High-Burden Region of Kenya

      Maman, D; Zeh, C; Mukui, I; Kirubi, B; Masson, S; Opolo, V; Szumilin, E; Riche, B; Etard, JF (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2015-07-31)
      Direct measurement of antiretroviral treatment (ART) program indicators essential for evidence-based planning and evaluation - especially HIV incidence, population viral load, and ART eligibility - is rare in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Clinical screening for HIV in a health centre setting in urban Kenya: an entry point for voluntary counselling, HIV testing and early diagnosis of HIV infection?

      Arendt, V; Mossong, J; Zachariah, R; Inwani, C; Farah, B; Robert, I; Waelbrouck, A; Fonck, K; Médecins Sans Frontières, Mission Kenya, Brussels Operational Centre, Brussels, Belgium. (2007-01)
      A study was conducted among patients attending a public health centre in Nairobi, Kenya in order to (a) verify the prevalence of HIV, (b) identify clinical risk factors associated with HIV and (c) determine clinical markers for clinical screening of HIV infection at the health centre level. Of 304 individuals involved in the study,107(35%) were HIV positive. A clinical screening algorithm based on four clinical markers, namely oral thrush, past or present TB, past or present herpes zoster and prurigo would pick out 61 (57%) of the 107 HIV-positive individuals. In a resource-poor setting, introducing a clinical screening algorithm for HIV at the health centre level could provide an opportunity for targeting voluntary counselling and HIV testing, and early access to a range of prevention and care interventions.
    • Community-based antiretroviral therapy programs can overcome barriers to retention of patients and decongest health services in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

      Decroo, Tom; Rasschaert, Freya; Telfer, Barbara; Remartinez, Daniel; Laga, Marie; Ford, Nathan; Médecins Sans Frontières, Av. Eduardo Mondlane 38 - CP 262, Tete, Mozambique. (Oxford University Press, 2013-09-05)
      In sub-Saharan Africa models of care need to adapt to support continued scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and retain millions in care. Task shifting, coupled with community participation has the potential to address the workforce gap, decongest health services, improve ART coverage, and to sustain retention of patients on ART over the long-term. The evidence supporting different models of community participation for ART care, or community-based ART, in sub-Saharan Africa, was reviewed. In Uganda and Kenya community health workers or volunteers delivered ART at home. In Mozambique people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) self-formed community-based ART groups to deliver ART in the community. These examples of community ART programs made treatment more accessible and affordable. However, to achieve success some major challenges need to be overcome: first, community programs need to be driven, owned by and embedded in the communities. Second, an enabling and supportive environment is needed to ensure that task shifting to lay staff and PLWHA is effective and quality services are provided. Finally, a long term vision and commitment from national governments and international donors is required. Exploration of the cost, effectiveness, and sustainability of the different community-based ART models in different contexts will be needed.
    • Effectiveness of a PMTCT programme in rural Western Kenya.

      Azcoaga-Lorenzo, A; Ferreyra, C; Alvarez, A; Palma, P P; Velilla, E; del Amo, J; Medecins Sans Frontieres-Spain/Operational Centre Barcelona-Athens, Barcelona, Spain. azcoaga@yahoo.es (Taylor and Francis, 2011-03)
      We assess the coverage of a Prevention of Mother-to-child Transmission (PMTCT) programme in Busia (Kenya) from 1 January 2006 to 31 December 2008 and estimate the risk of transmission of HIV. We also estimate the odds of HIV transmission according to pharmacological intervention received. Programme coverage was estimated as the proportion of mother-baby pairs receiving any antiretroviral (ARV) regimen among all HIV-positive women attending services. We estimated the mother-to-child transmission (MTCT) rate and their 95% confidence interval (95%CI) using the direct method of calculation (intermediate estimate). A case-control study was established among all children born to HIV-positive mothers with information on outcome (HIV status of the babies) and exposure (data on pharmacological intervention). Cases were all HIV-positive children and controls were the HIV-negative ones. Exposure was defined as: (1) complete protocol: ARV prescribed according World Health Organisation recommendations; (2) partial protocol: does not meet criteria for complete protocol; and (3) no intervention: ARVs were not prescribed to both mother and child. Babies were tested using DNA Polymerase Chain Reaction at six weeks of life and six weeks after breastfeeding ceased. In the study period, 22,566 women accepted testing, 1668 were HIV positive (7.4%; 95%CI 7.05-7.73); 1036 (62%) registered in the programme and 632 were lost. Programme coverage was 40.4% (95%CI 37.9-42.7). Out of the 767 newborns, 28 (3.6%) died, 148 (19.3%) defaulted, 282 (36.7%) were administratively censored and 309 (40.2%) babies completed the follow-up as per protocol; 49 were HIV positive and MTCT risk was 15.86% (95%CI 11.6-20.1). The odds of having an HIV-positive baby was 4.6 times higher among pairs receiving a partial protocol compared to those receiving a complete protocol and 43 times higher among those receiving no intervention. Our data show a good level of enrolment but low global coverage rate. It demonstrates that ARV regimens can be implemented in low resource rural settings with marked decreases of MTCT. Increasing the coverage of PMTCT programmes remains the main challenge.
    • Monitoring HIV Viral Load in Resource Limited Settings: Still a Matter of Debate?

      Arnedo, M; Alonso, E; Eisenberg, N; Ibáñez, L; Ferreyra, C; Jaén, A; Flevaud, L; Khamadi, S; Roddy, P; Gatell, JM; et al. (Public Library of Science, 2012-12-06)
      Consequences of lack of viral monitoring in predicting the effects of development of HIV drug resistance mutations during HAART in resource-limited settings (RLS) is still a matter of debate.
    • Paediatric HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa: clinical presentation and 2-year outcomes stratified by age group

      Ben-Farhat, Jihane; Gale, Marianne; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Balkan, Suna; Poulet, Elisabeth; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2013-09)
      To examine age differences in mortality and programme attrition amongst paediatric patients treated in four African HIV programmes.
    • A qualitative investigation of adherence to nutritional therapy in malnourished adult AIDS patients in Kenya

      Dibari, Filippo; Bahwere, Paluku; Le Gall, Isabelle; Guerrero, Saul; Mwaniki, David; Seal, Andrew; Valid International, Oxford, UK; UCL Centre for International Health and Development, Institute of Child Health, London, UK; MSF-France, Nairobi, Kenya/Paris, France; Centre for Public Health, Kenya Medical Research Institute, KEMRI/CPHR, Nairobi, Kenya; Academy for Educational Development/Regional Office for Eastern and Central Africa, Nairobi, Kenya (Cambridge University Press, 2011-02-04)
      To understand factors affecting the compliance of malnourished, HIV-positive adults with a nutritional protocol using ready-to-use therapeutic food (RUTF; Plumpy'nut®).
    • Weight gain at 3 months of antiretroviral therapy is strongly associated with survival: evidence from two developing countries

      Madec, Yoann; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Genevier, Christine; Ferradini, Laurent; Balkan, Suna; Pujades, Mar; Fontanet, Arnaud; Unité d'Epidémiologie des Maladies Emergentes, Institut Pasteur, Paris, France; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Paris, France; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Nairobi, Kenya; Infectious Diseases Department, Khmero-Soviet Friendship Hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Epicentre, Paris, France (2009-04-27)
      BACKGROUND: In developing countries, access to laboratory tests remains limited, and the use of simple tools such as weight to monitor HIV-infected patients treated with antiretroviral therapy should be evaluated. METHODS: Cohort study of 2451 Cambodian and 2618 Kenyan adults who initiated antiretroviral therapy between 2001 and 2007. The prognostic value of weight gain at 3 months of antiretroviral therapy on 3-6 months mortality, and at 6 months on 6-12 months mortality, was investigated using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Mortality rates [95% confidence interval (CI)] between 3 and 6 months of antiretroviral therapy were 9.9 (7.6-12.7) and 13.5 (11.0-16.7) per 100 person-years in Cambodia and Kenya, respectively. At 3 months, among patients with initial body mass index less than or equal to 18.5 kg/m (43% of the study population), mortality rate ratios (95% CI) were 6.3 (3.0-13.1) and 3.4 (1.4-8.3) for those with weight gain less than or equal to 5 and 5-10%, respectively, compared with those with weight gain of more than 10%. At 6 months, weight gain was also predictive of subsequent mortality: mortality rate ratio (95% CI) was 7.3 (4.0-13.3) for those with weight gain less than or equal to 5% compared with those with weight gain of more than 10%. CONCLUSION: Weight gain at 3 months is strongly associated with survival. Poor compliance or undiagnosed opportunistic infections should be investigated in patients with initial body mass index less than or equal to 18.5 and achieving weight gain less than or equal to 10%.