• CD4 Testing at Clinics to Assess Eligibility for Antiretroviral Therapy

      Lumala, R; van den Akker, T; Metcalf, CA; Diggle, E; Zamadenga, B; Mbewa, K; Akkeson, A (College of Medicine, University of Malawi, 2012-06-01)
      In 2011, the Ministry of Health raised the CD4 threshold for antiretroviral therapy (ART) eligibility from <250 cells/µl and <350 cells/µl, but at the same time only 8.8% of facilities in Malawi with HIV services provided CD4 testing. We conducted a record review at 10 rural clinics in Thyolo District to assess the impact of introducing CD4 testing on identifying patients eligible for ART.
    • Errors Generated by a Point-Of-Care CD4+ T-Lymphocyte Analyser: a Retrospective Observational Study in Nine Countries

      Fajardo, E; Metcalf, C; Piriou, E; Gueguen, M; Maman, D; Chaillet, P; Cox, V; Rumaney, MB; Tunggal, S; Kosack, C; Roberts, T (World Health Organization, 2015-09-01)
      To estimate the proportion of invalid results generated by a CD4+ T-lymphocyte analyser used by Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) in field projects and identify factors associated with invalid results.
    • Evaluation of a 5-year programme to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection in Northern Uganda

      Ahoua, Laurence; Ayikoru, Harriet; Gnauck, Katherine; Odaru, Grace; Odar, Emmanuel; Ondoa-Onama, Christine; Pinoges, Loretxu; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Epicentre, Paris, France; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Kampala, Uganda; Arua Regional District Hospital, Ministry of Health, Arua, Uganda; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Paris, France (2010-07-13)
      Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) is essential in HIV/AIDS control. We analysed 2000-05 data from mother-infant pairs in our PMTCT programme in rural Uganda, examining programme utilization and outcomes, HIV transmission rates and predictors of death or loss to follow-up (LFU). Out of 19,017 women, 1,037 (5.5%) attending antenatal care services tested HIV positive. Of these, 517 (50%) enrolled in the PMTCT programme and gave birth to 567 infants. Before tracing, 303 (53%) mother-infant pairs were LFU. Reasons for dropout were infant death and lack of understanding of importance of follow-up. Risk of death or LFU was higher among infants with no or incomplete intrapartum prophylaxis (OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.07-3.36) and of weaning age <6 months (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.42-4.58), and lower in infants with diagnosed acute illness (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.16-0.55). Mother-to-child HIV cumulative transmission rate was 8.3%, and 15.5% when HIV-related deaths were considered. Improved tracking of HIV-exposed infants is needed in PMTCT programmes where access to early infant diagnosis is still limited.
    • Eye exam with indirect ophthalmoscopy for diagnosis of disseminated tuberculosis in patients with HIV/AIDS

      Heiden, David; Margolis, Todd P; Lowinger, Alan; Saranchuk, Peter (BMJ Publishing Group, 2013-05-01)
    • High rates of active hepatitis B and C co-infections in HIV-1 infected Cameroonian adults initiating antiretroviral therapy

      Laurent, C; Bourgeois, A; Mpoudi-Ngolé, E; Kouanfack, C; Ciaffi, L; Nkoué, N; Mougnutou, R; Calmy, A; Koulla-Shiro, S; Ducos, J; Delaporte, E; Institut de Recherche pour le Développement, University Montpellier 1, Montpellier, France; Department of Infectious and Tropical Diseases, University Hospital, Montpellier, France; Military Hospital, Yaounde, Cameroon; Central Hospital, Yaounde, Cameroon; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Laboratory of Viral Hepatitis, University Hospital, Montpellier, France (2009-07-29)
      OBJECTIVES: To investigate the presence of hepatitis B virus (HBV) DNA and hepatitis C virus (HCV) RNA in HIV-infected patients initiating antiretroviral therapy in Cameroon. METHODS: Baseline blood samples from 169 patients were tested retrospectively for hepatitis B surface antigens (HBsAg), anti-hepatitis B core (anti-HBc), anti-HCV and - if HBsAg or anti-HCV result was positive or indeterminate - for HBV DNA or HCV RNA, respectively, using the Cobas Ampliprep/Cobas TaqMan quantitative assay (Roche Diagnostics GmbH, Mannheim, Germany). RESULTS: HBV DNA was detected in 14 of the 18 patients with positive or indeterminate HBsAg results [8.3% of the total study population, 95% confidence interval (CI) 4.6-13.5]. The median HBV viral load was 2.47 x 10(7) IU/mL [interquartile range (IQR) 3680-1.59 x 10(8); range 270 to >2.2 x 10(8)]. Twenty-one patients (12.4%, 95% CI 7.9-18.4) were found with HCV RNA (all with positive HCV serology). The median HCV viral load was 928 000 IU/mL (IQR 178 400-2.06 x 10(6); range 640-5.5 x 10(6)). No patient was co-infected with HBV and HCV. In multivariate analysis, HCV co-infection was associated with greater age [>or=45 years vs. <45 years, odds ratio (OR) 11.89, 95% CI 3.49-40.55, P<0.001] and abnormal serum alanine aminotransferase level [>or=1.25 x upper limit of normal (ULN) vs. <1.25 x ULN, OR 7.81, 95% CI 1.54-39.66, P=0.01]; HBV co-infection was associated with abnormal serum aspartate aminotransferase level (OR 4.33, 95% CI 1.32-14.17, P=0.02). CONCLUSIONS: These high rates of active HBV and HCV co-infections in HIV-positive Cameroonian patients requiring antiretroviral therapy underline the need to promote: (i) screening for HBV and HCV before treatment initiation; (ii) accessibility to tenofovir (especially in HBV-endemic African countries); and (iii) accessibility to treatment for HBV and HCV infections.
    • Immunovirological response to combined antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance patterns in children: 1- and 2-year outcomes in rural Uganda.

      Ahoua, Laurence; Guenther, Gunar; Rouzioux, Christine; Pinoges, Loretxu; Anguzu, Paul; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David M; Olaro, Charles; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Clinical Research Department, Epicentre, Paris, France; Laboratory of Virology, Necker Hospital, Paris, France; Department of Operations, Médecins Sans Frontières, Arua, Uganda; Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology, Bicêtre Hospital, Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, New York, USA; Medical and Administrative Hospital Direction, Arua Regional Referral Hospital, Arua, Uganda (BioMed Central, 2011-07-26)
      Children living with HIV continue to be in urgent need of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART). Strategies to scale up and improve pediatric HIV care in resource-poor regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, require further research from these settings. We describe treatment outcomes in children treated in rural Uganda after 1 and 2 years of ART start.
    • Outcomes and safety of concomitant nevirapine and rifampicin treatment under programme conditions in Malawi.

      Moses, M; Zachariah, R; Tayler-Smith, K; Misinde, D; Foncha, C; Manzi, M; Bauerfeind, A; Mwagomba, B; Kwanjana, J; Harries, A D; Médecins sans Frontières, Thyolo District, Thyolo, Malawi. (2010-02)
      SETTING: Thyolo District Hospital, rural Malawi. OBJECTIVES: To report on 1) clinical, immunological and virological outcomes and 2) safety among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infected patients with tuberculosis (TB) who received concurrent nevirapine (NVP) and rifampicin (RMP) based treatment. DESIGN: Retrospective cohort study. METHODS: Analysis of programme data, June-December 2007. RESULTS: Of a total of 156 HIV-infected TB patients who started NVP-based antiretroviral treatment, 136 (87%) completed TB treatment successfully, 16 (10%) died and 5 (4%) were transferred out. Mean body weight and CD4 gain (adults) were respectively 4.4 kg (95%CI 3.3-5.4) and 140 cells/mm(3) (95%CI 117-162). Seventy-four per cent of patients who completed TB treatment and had a viral load performed (n = 74) had undetectable levels (<50 copies/ml), while 17 (22%) had a viral load of 50-1000 copies/ml. Hepatotoxicity was present in 2 (1.3%) patients at baseline. Two patients developed Grade 2 and one developed Grade 3 alanine transaminase enzyme elevations during TB treatment (incidence rate per 10 years of follow-up 4.2, 95%CI 1.4-13.1). There were no reported deaths linked to hepatotoxicity. CONCLUSIONS: In a rural district in Malawi, concomitant NVP and RMP treatment is associated with good TB treatment outcomes and appears safe. Further follow-up of patients would be useful to ascertain the longer-term effects of this concurrent treatment.
    • Similar mortality and reduced loss to follow-up in integrated compared with vertical programs providing antiretroviral treatment in sub-saharan Africa.

      Greig, Jane; O'Brien, Daniel P; Ford, Nathan; Spelman, Tim; Sabapathy, Kalpana; Shanks, Leslie; Manson Unit, Médecins sans Frontières, Saffron Hill, London, UK. jane.greig@london.msf.org (2012-04-15)
      Vertical HIV programs have achieved good results but may not be feasible or appropriate in many resource-limited settings. Médecins sans Frontières has treated HIV in vertical programs since 2000 and over time integrated HIV treatment into general health care services using simplified protocols. We analyzed the survival probability among patients receiving antiretroviral therapy (ART) from 2003 to 2010 in integrated versus vertical programs in 9 countries in sub-Saharan Africa.