• Adherence to antiretroviral therapy in patients enrolled in a comprehensive care program in Cambodia: a 24-month follow-up assessment

      Spire, Bruno; Carrieri, Patrizia; Sopha, Pal; Protopopescu, Camelia; Prak, Narom; Quillet, Catherine; Ngeth, Chanchhaya; Ferradini, Laurent; Delfraissy, Jean-François; Laureillard, Didier; Inserm U912, Economic and Social Sciences, Health Systems and Societies, Marseille, France; Infectious Disease Department, Khmero-Sovietic Friendship Hospital, Phnom Penh, Cambodia; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Epicentre, Paris, France; Clinical Immunology Department, Bicêtre Hospital, Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Immunological Department, Georges Pompidou, European Hospital, Paris France (2008-05)
      BACKGROUND: The long-term maintenance of antiretroviral therapy (ART) remains an important issue, especially in limited-resource settings where additional barriers exist. A cross-sectional study was performed 24 months after ART initiation for patients treated in Cambodia in order to estimate the prevalence and identify determinants of non-adherence. METHODS: Adults receiving ART for 24 +/- 2 months were considered eligible for the study. Self-reported non-adherence was defined according to an algorithm based on six items. The questionnaire also assessed ART-related side effects and HIV disclosure. HIV-1 RNA plasma viral load was measured using real-time PCR. Multivariate rare events logistic regression analysis was used to identify independent factors associated with non-adherence. RESULTS: A total of 346 patients participated in the study. At 24 months, 95% of patients were adherent, 80% had HIV RNA <40 copies/ml and 75% had CD4+ T-cell counts >200 cells/mm3. Virological success was significantly higher in adherent patients than in non-adherent patients (81% versus 56%, P=0.021). Living in a rural area, limited HIV disclosure and perceived lipodystrophy were independently associated with non-adherence. CONCLUSIONS: At 24 months, adherence to ART was high and explained positive virological outcomes. In order to maintain adherence and long-term virological benefits, special attention should be given to patients living in rural areas, those with lipodystrophy-related symptoms and others who express difficulties disclosing their condition to close family members.
    • First-line and second-line antiretroviral therapy.

      Calmy, A; Pascual, F; Ford, N (Elsevier, 2004)
    • Generic Fixed-Dose Combination Antiretroviral Treatment in Resource-Poor Settings: Multicentric Observational Cohort

      Calmy, A; Pinoges, L; Szumilin, E; Zachariah, R; Ford, N; Ferradini, L; MSF, Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, 78 rue de Lausanne, 1205 Geneva, Switzerland. acalmy@stvincents.com.au (2006-05-12)
      BACKGROUND: The use fixed-dose combination (FDC) is a critical tool in improving HAART. Studies on the effectiveness of combined lamivudine, stavudine and nevirapine (3TC/d4T/NVP) are scarce. OBJECTIVE: To analyse 6861 patients in a large observational cohort from 21 Médecins Sans Frontieres (MSF) HIV/AIDS programmes taking 3TC/d4T/NVP, with subcohort analyses of patients at 12 and 18 months of treatment. METHODS: Survival was analysed using Kaplan-Meier method and factors associated with progression to death with Cox proportional hazard ratio. RESULTS: Median baseline CD4 cell count at initiating of FDC was 89 cells/microl [interquartile range (IQR), 33-158]. The median follow-up time was 4.1 months (IQR, 1.9-7.3). The incidence rate of death during follow-up was 14.2/100 person-years [95% confidence interval (CI), 13.8-14.5]. Estimates of survival (excluding those lost to follow-up) were 0.93 (95% CI, 92-94) at 6 months (n = 2,231) and 0.90 (95% CI, 89-91) at 12 months (n = 472). Using a Cox model, the following factors were associated with death: male gender, symptomatic infection, body mass index < 18 kg/m and CD4 cell count 15-50 cells/microl or < 15 cells/microl. Subcohort analysis of 655 patients after 1 year of follow-up (M12 FDC cohort) revealed that 77% remained on HAART, 91% of these still on the FDC regimen; 5% discontinued the FDC because of drug intolerance. At 18 months, 77% of the patients remained on HAART. CONCLUSIONS: Positive outcomes for d4T/3TC/NVP are reported for up to 18 months in terms of efficacy and safety.
    • HIV drug resistance.

      Calmy, A; Pascual, F; Ford, N (Massachusetts Medical Society, 2004-06-24)
    • Immunovirological response to combined antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance patterns in children: 1- and 2-year outcomes in rural Uganda.

      Ahoua, Laurence; Guenther, Gunar; Rouzioux, Christine; Pinoges, Loretxu; Anguzu, Paul; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David M; Olaro, Charles; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Clinical Research Department, Epicentre, Paris, France; Laboratory of Virology, Necker Hospital, Paris, France; Department of Operations, Médecins Sans Frontières, Arua, Uganda; Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology, Bicêtre Hospital, Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, New York, USA; Medical and Administrative Hospital Direction, Arua Regional Referral Hospital, Arua, Uganda (BioMed Central, 2011-07-26)
      Children living with HIV continue to be in urgent need of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART). Strategies to scale up and improve pediatric HIV care in resource-poor regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, require further research from these settings. We describe treatment outcomes in children treated in rural Uganda after 1 and 2 years of ART start.
    • Resistance profiles after different periods of exposure to a first-line antiretroviral regimen in a Cameroonian cohort of HIV type-1-infected patients.

      Soria, A; Porten, K; Fampou-Toundji, J; Galli, L; Mougnutou, R; Buard, V; Kfutwah, A; Vessière, A; Rousset, D; Teck, R; Calmy, A; Ciaffi, L; Lazzarin, A; Gianotti, N; Department of Infectious Diseases, San Raffaele Scientific Institute, Milan, Italy. a.soria@hsgerardo.org (2009-08)
      BACKGROUND: The lack of HIV type-1 (HIV-1) viral load (VL) monitoring in resource-limited settings might favour the accumulation of resistance mutations and thus hamper second-line treatment efficacy. We investigated the factors associated with resistance after the initiation of antiretroviral therapy (ART) in the absence of virological monitoring. METHODS: Cross-sectional VL sampling of HIV-1-infected patients receiving first-line ART (nevirapine or efavirenz plus stavudine or zidovudine plus lamivudine) was carried out; those with a detectable VL were genotyped. RESULTS: Of the 573 patients undergoing VL sampling, 84 were genotyped. The mean number of nucleoside/nucleotide reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NRTI) mutations increased with the duration of ART exposure (P=0.02). Multivariable analysis showed that patients with a CD4+ T-cell count < or =50 cells/mm(3) at ART initiation (baseline) had a higher mean number of both NRTI and non-NRTI (NNRTI) mutations than those with a baseline CD4+ T-cell count >50 cells/mm(3) (2.10 versus 0.56; P<0.0001; and 1.65 versus 0.76; P=0.005, respectively). A baseline CD4+ T-cell count < or =50 cells/mm(3) predicted > or =1 NRTI mutation (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 7.49, 95% confidence interval [CI] 2.20-32.14), > or =1 NNRTI mutation (AOR 4.25, 95% CI 1.36-15.48), > or =1 thymidine analogue mutation (AOR 8.45, 95% CI 2.16-40.16) and resistance to didanosine (AOR 6.36, 95% CI 1.49-32.29) and etravirine (AOR 4.72, 95% CI 1.53-15.70). CONCLUSIONS: Without VL monitoring, the risk of drug resistance increases with the duration of ART and is associated with lower CD4+ T-cell counts at ART initiation. These data might help define strategies to preserve second-line treatment options in resource-limited settings.
    • Second-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: the experience of Médecins Sans Frontières

      Pujades-Rodriguez, M; O'Brien, D; Humblet, P; Calmy, A; Epicentre, Paris, France; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Campaign for Access to Essential Medicines, Geneva, Switzerland (2008-07-11)
      OBJECTIVES: To describe the use of second-line protease-inhibitor regimens in Médecins Sans Frontières HIV programmes, and determine switch rates, clinical outcomes, and factors associated with survival. DESIGN/METHODS: We used patient data from 62 Médecins Sans Frontières programmes and included all antiretroviral therapy-naive adults (> 15 years) at the start of antiretroviral therapy and switched to a protease inhibitor-containing regimen with at least one nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor change after more than 6 months of nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor first-line use. Cumulative switch rates and survival curves were estimated using Kaplan-Meier methods, and mortality predictors were investigated using Poisson regression. RESULTS: Of 48,338 adults followed on antiretroviral therapy, 370 switched to a second-line regimen after a median of 20 months (switch rate 4.8/1000 person-years). Median CD4 cell count at switch was 99 cells/microl (interquartile ratio 39-200; n = 244). A lopinavir/ritonavir-based regimen was given to 51% of patients and nelfinavir-based regimen to 43%; 29% changed one nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor and 71% changed two nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitors. Median follow-up on second-line antiretroviral therapy was 8 months, and probability of remaining in care at 12 months was 0.86. Median CD4 gains were 90 at 6 months and 135 at 12 months. Death rates were higher in patients in World Health Organization stage 4 at antiretroviral therapy initiation and in those with CD4 nadir count less than 50 cells/microl. CONCLUSION: The rate of switch to second-line treatment in antiretroviral therapy-naive adults on non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based first-line antiretroviral therapy was relatively low, with good early outcomes observed in protease inhibitor-based second-line regimens. Severe immunosuppression was associated with increased mortality on second-line treatment.
    • Substitutions due to antiretroviral toxicity or contraindication in the first 3 years of antiretroviral therapy in a large South African cohort.

      Boulle, A; Orrell, C; Kaplan, R; Van Cutsem, G; McNally, M; Hilderbrand, K; Myer, L; Egger, M; Coetzee, D; Maartens, G; Wood, R; Infectious Disease Epidemiology Unit, School of Public Health and Family Medicine, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa. andrew.boulle@uct.ac.za (International Medical Press, 2007)
      INTRODUCTION: The patterns and reasons for antiretroviral therapy (ART) drug substitutions are poorly described in resource-limited settings. METHODS: Time to and reason for drug substitution were recorded in treatment-naive adults receiving ART in two primary care treatment programmes in Cape Town. The cumulative proportion of patients having therapy changed because of toxicity was described for each drug, and associations with these changes were explored in multivariate models. RESULTS: Analysis included 2,679 individuals followed for a median of 11 months. Median CD4+ T-cell count at baseline was 85 cells/microl. Mean weight was 59 kg, mean age was 32 years and 71% were women. All started non-nucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor-based ART (60% on efavrienz) and 75% started on stavudine (d4T). After 3 years, 75% remained in care on-site, of whom 72% remained on their initial regimen. Substitutions due to toxicity of nevirapine (8% by 3 years), efavirenz (2%) and zidovudine (8%) occurred early. Substitutions on d4T occurred in 21% of patients by 3 years, due to symptomatic hyperlactataemia (5%), lipodystrophy (9%) or peripheral neuropathy (6%), and continued to accumulate over time. Those at greatest risk of hyperlactataemia or lipodystrophy were women on ART > or =6 months, weighing > or =75 kg at baseline. DISCUSSION: A high proportion of adult patients are able to tolerate their initial ART regimen for up to 3 years. In most instances treatment-limiting toxicities occur early, but continue to accumulate over time in patients on d4T. Whilst awaiting other treatment options, the risks of known toxicities could be minimized through early identification of patients at the highest risk.
    • Switching to second-line antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings: comparison of programmes with and without viral load monitoring.

      Keiser, Olivia; Tweya, Hannock; Boulle, Andrew; Braitstein, Paula; Schecter, Mauro; Brinkhof, Martin W G; Dabis, François; Tuboi, Suely; Sprinz, Eduardo; Pujades-Rodriguez, Mar; Calmy, Alexandra; Kumarasamy, Nagalingeswaran; Nash, Denis; Jahn, Andreas; MacPhail, Patrick; Lüthy, Ruedi; Wood, Robin; Egger, Matthias; Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine (ISPM), University of Bern, Bern, Switzerland. (2009-09-10)
      In high-income countries, viral load is routinely measured to detect failure of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and guide switching to second-line ART. Viral load monitoring is not generally available in resource-limited settings. We examined switching from nonnucleoside reverse transcriptase inhibitor (NNRTI)-based first-line regimens to protease inhibitor-based regimens in Africa, South America and Asia.
    • Treatment Outcomes Stratified by Baseline Immunological Status Among Young Children Receiving Nonnucleoside Reverse-Transcriptase Inhibitor-Based Antiretroviral Therapy in Resource-Limited Settings.

      O'Brien, D P; Sauvageot, D; Olson, D; Schaeffer, M; Humblet, P; Pudjades, M; Ellman, T; Zachariah, R; Szumilin, E; Arnould, L; Reid, T; AIDS Working Group, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France. daniel.obrien@amsterdam.msf.org (Published by: Infectious Diseases Society of America, 2007-05-01)
      A study of 568 children aged <5 years who commenced nonnucleoside reverse-transcriptase inhibitor-based antiretroviral therapy in resource-limited settings revealed good early outcomes. After 12 months of antiretroviral therapy, survival probability was 0.89 (95% confidence interval, 0.86-0.92), with no significant difference among children stratified on the basis of baseline immunological levels; 62% attained a CD4 cell percentage >25%, and 7% continued to have a CD4 cell percentage <15%.