• A Drug Dosage Table is a Useful Tool to Facilitate Prescriptions of Antiretroviral Drugs for Children in Thailand.

      Ponnet, M; Frederix, K; Petdachai, W; Wilson, D; Eksaengsri, A; Zachariah, R; Médecins Sans Frontières, Bangkok, Thailand. (2005-06)
      Scaling up of antiretroviral treatment (ART) for children in countries like Thailand will require decentralization and management by non-specialist doctors. We describe (a) the formulation of a standardized drug dosage table to facilitate antiretroviral drug (ARV) prescriptions for children, (b) the acceptability of such a table among doctors and (c) the safety and efficacy of drug doses in the table. Acceptability was assessed using a questionnaire. Safety and efficacy were assessed on the basis of incidence of adverse effects and virological response to treatment, respectively. Of all doctors (n=18), 17 (94%) found that the table was practical to use, avoided miscalculations and made them more confident with prescriptions. Of 49 children prescribed ARVs, less than 5% had adverse side-effects. All ARV-naïve children achieved undetectable viral loads within six months of ART. In our setting, a standardized drug dosage table provided a simple and reliable tool that facilitated ARV prescriptions for children.
    • Challenge and co-operation: civil society activism for access to HIV treatment in Thailand.

      Ford, N; Wilson, D; Cawthorne, P; Kumphitak, A; Kasi-Sedapan, S; Kaetkaew, S; Teemanka, S; Donmon, B; Preuanbuapan, C; Médecins Sans Frontières, Bangkok, Thailand. david.wilson.thai@gmail.com (Published by Wiley-Blackwell, 2009-03)
      Civil society has been a driving force behind efforts to increase access to treatment in Thailand. A focus on HIV medicines brought civil society and non-governmental and government actors together to fight for a single cause, creating a platform for joint action on practical issues to improve care for people with HIV/AIDS (PHA) within the public health system. The Thai Network of People with HIV/AIDS, in partnership with other actors, has provided concrete support for patients and for the health system as a whole; its efforts have contributed significantly to the availability of affordable generic medicines, early treatment for opportunistic infections, and an informed and responsible approach towards antiretroviral treatment that is critical to good adherence and treatment success. This change in perception of PHA from 'passive receiver' to 'co-provider' of health care has led to improved acceptance and support within the healthcare system. Today, most PHA in Thailand can access treatment, and efforts have shifted to supporting care for excluded populations.
    • HIV and cytomegalovirus in Thailand.

      Chua, A; Wilson, D; Ford, N (Elsevier, 2005-06)
    • HIV prevention, care, and treatment in two prisons in Thailand.

      Wilson, D; Ford, N; Ngammee, V; Chua, A; Kyaw, M K K; Médecins Sans Frontières, Bangkapi, Bangkok, Thailand. (Public Library of Science, 2007-06)
    • Sustaining Access to Antiretroviral Therapy in the Less-Developed World: Lessons from Brazil and Thailand.

      Ford, N; Wilson, D; Costa Chaves, G; Lotrowska, M; Kijtiwatchakul, K; Médecins Sans Frontières, 522 Mooban Nakorn Thai 14, Ladphrao Soi 101/1, Bangkok 10240, Thailand. nathan.ford@london.msf.org (2007-07)
      ANTIRETROVIRAL ROLLOUT IN BRAZIL AND THAILAND: Brazil and Thailand are among few developing countries to achieve universal access to antiretroviral therapy. Three factors were critical to this success: legislation for free access to treatment; public sector capacity to manufacture medicines; and strong civil society action to support government initiatives to improve access. LOCAL PRODUCTION OF AFFORDABLE, NON-PATENTED DRUGS: Many older antiretroviral drugs are not patented in either country and affordable generic versions are manufactured by local pharmaceutical institutes. EFFORTS TO ENSURE ACCESS TO EXPENSIVE, PATENTED DRUGS: Developing countries were not required to grant patents on medicines until 2005, but under US government threats of trade sanctions, Thailand and Brazil began doing so at least ten years prior to this date. Brazil has used price negotiations with multi-national pharmaceutical companies to lower the price of newer patented antiretrovirals. However, the prices obtained by this approach remain unaffordable. Thailand recently employed compulsory licensing for two antiretrovirals, obtaining substantial price reductions, both for generic and brand products. Following Thailand's example, Brazil has issued its first compulsory license. LESSONS LEARNED: Middle-income countries are unable to pay the high prices of multinational pharmaceutical companies. By relying on negotiations with companies, Brazil pays up to four times more for some drugs compared with prices available internationally. Compulsory licensing has brought treatment with newer antiretrovirals within reach in Thailand, but has resulted in pressure from industry and the US government. An informed and engaged civil society is essential to support governments in putting health before trade.
    • Zidovudine to prevent mother-to-infant HIV transmission in developing countries: a view from Thailand.

      Kumphitak, A; Cawthorne, P; Lakhonphol, S; Kasi-Sedapan, S; Sanaeha, S; Unchit, N; Wilson, D (1999-03)