• Moxifloxacin for Buruli ulcer/HIV coinfected patients: kill two birds with one stone?

      O'Brien, Daniel P; Comte, Eric; Ford, Nathan; Christinet, Vanessa; du Cros, Philipp; aManson Unit, Médecins Sans Frontières, London, UK bDepartment of Infectious Diseases, Geelong Hospital, Geelong cDepartment of Medicine and Infectious Diseases, Royal Melbourne Hospital, University of Melbourne, Melbourne, Australia dMedical Unit, Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland eCenter for Infectious Diseases Epidemiology Research, University of Cape Town, Cape Town, South Africa fDepartment of HIV, University Hospitals of Geneva, Geneva, Switzerland. (2013-09-10)
    • Tough choices: tenofovir, tenders and treatment

      Ford, N; Gray, A; Venter, F (South African Medical Association, 2008-06-04)
      Scaling up antiretroviral therapy (ART) in developing countries would not have been possible without market competition, which has driven down the price of standard first-line ARV drugs from more than US$12,000 per person per year in 2000 to US$99 today. However, access to new, second-line ARVs remains largely restricted to originator (patented) drugs. This causes significant challenges in countries where access to newer drugs is becoming inceasingly important as programmes mature and face challenges related to drug toxicity and resistance. Toxicity, in particular, has emerged as a major reason for individual drug switches and regimen changes, and is strongly implicated in decreasing adherence.