• Performance of FASTPlaqueTB and a modified protocol in a high HIV prevalence community in South Africa.

      Trollip, A P; Albert, H; Mole, R; Marshall, T; van Cutsem, G; Coetzee, D; Biotec Laboratories South Africa Ltd, Cape Town, South Africa. andre.trollip@bioteclabs.co.za (2009-06)
      Modifications in the FASTPlaqueTB test protocol have resulted in an increase in the analytical limits of detection. This study investigated whether the performance of a modified prototype was able to increase the detection of smear-negative, culture-positive sputum samples as compared to the first generation FASTPlaqueTB test. Modifications to the FASTPlaqueTB did result in increased detection of smear-negative samples, but this was associated with a decrease in the specificity of the test. Before the FASTPlaqueTB can be considered as a viable replacement for smear microscopy and culture for the identification of tuberculosis, further work is required to resolve the performance issues identified in this study.
    • Population Differences in Death Rates in HIV-Positive Patients with Tuberculosis.

      Ciglenecki, I; Glynn, J R; Mwinga, A; Ngwira, B; Zumla, A; Fine, P E M; Nunn, A; Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland. iza_ciglenecki@yahoo.com (International Union Against TB and Lung Disease, 2007-10)
      SETTING: Randomised controlled clinical trial of Mycobacterium vaccae vaccination as an adjunct to anti-tuberculosis treatment in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) positive patients with smear-positive tuberculosis (TB) in Lusaka, Zambia, and Karonga, Malawi. OBJECTIVE: To explain the difference in mortality between the two trial sites and to identify risk factors for death among HIV-positive patients with TB. DESIGN: Information on demographic, clinical, laboratory and radiographic characteristics was collected. Patients in Lusaka (667) and in Karonga (84) were followed up for an average of 1.56 years. Cox proportional hazard analyses were used to assess differences in survival between the two sites and to determine risk factors associated with mortality during and after anti-tuberculosis treatment. RESULTS: The case fatality rate was 14.7% in Lusaka and 21.4% in Karonga. The hazard ratio for death comparing Karonga to Lusaka was 1.47 (95% confidence interval [CI] 0.9-2.4) during treatment and 1.76 (95%CI 1.0-3.0) after treatment. This difference could be almost entirely explained by age and more advanced HIV disease among patients in Karonga. CONCLUSION: It is important to understand the reasons for population differences in mortality among patients with TB and HIV and to maximise efforts to reduce mortality.
    • Very early mortality in patients starting antiretroviral treatment at primary health centres in rural Malawi.

      Zachariah, Rony; Harries, Katie; Moses, Massaquoi; Manzi, Marcel; Line, Arnould; Mwagomba, Beatrice; Harries, Anthony D; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Medical Department, Brussels, Belgium. zachariah@internet.lu (2009-07-15)
      OBJECTIVES: To report on the cumulative proportion of deaths occurring within 3 months of starting antiretroviral treatment (ART) and to identify factors associated with such deaths, among adults at primary health centres in a rural district of Malawi. METHODS: Retrospective cohort study: from June 2006 to April 2008, deaths occurring over a 3-month period were determined and risk factors examined. RESULTS: A total of 2316 adults (706 men and 1610 women; median age 35 years) were included in the analysis and followed up for a total of 1588 person-years (PY); 277 (12%) people died, of whom 206 (74%) people died within 3 months of initiating ART (cumulative incidence: 13.0; 95% confidence interval: 11.3-14.8 per 100 PY of follow-up). Significant risk factors associated with early deaths included male sex, WHO stage 4 disease, oesophageal or persistent oral candidiasis and unexplained presumed or measured weight loss >10%. One in every 3 patients who either died or was lost to follow up had unexplained weight loss >10%, and survival in this group was significantly different from patients without this condition. CONCLUSIONS: Seven in 10 individuals initiating ART at primary health centres die early. Specific groups of patients are at higher risk of such mortality and should receive priority attention, care and support.
    • Viral load for HIV treatment failure management: a report of eight drug-resistant tuberculosis cases co-infected with HIV requiring second-line antiretroviral treatment in Mumbai, India

      Andries, Aristomo; Das, Mrinalini; Isaakidis, Petros; Saranchuk, Peter (American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2013-12)