• Community-based antiretroviral therapy programs can overcome barriers to retention of patients and decongest health services in sub-Saharan Africa: a systematic review

      Decroo, Tom; Rasschaert, Freya; Telfer, Barbara; Remartinez, Daniel; Laga, Marie; Ford, Nathan; Médecins Sans Frontières, Av. Eduardo Mondlane 38 - CP 262, Tete, Mozambique. (Oxford University Press, 2013-09-05)
      In sub-Saharan Africa models of care need to adapt to support continued scale up of antiretroviral therapy (ART) and retain millions in care. Task shifting, coupled with community participation has the potential to address the workforce gap, decongest health services, improve ART coverage, and to sustain retention of patients on ART over the long-term. The evidence supporting different models of community participation for ART care, or community-based ART, in sub-Saharan Africa, was reviewed. In Uganda and Kenya community health workers or volunteers delivered ART at home. In Mozambique people living with HIV/AIDS (PLWHA) self-formed community-based ART groups to deliver ART in the community. These examples of community ART programs made treatment more accessible and affordable. However, to achieve success some major challenges need to be overcome: first, community programs need to be driven, owned by and embedded in the communities. Second, an enabling and supportive environment is needed to ensure that task shifting to lay staff and PLWHA is effective and quality services are provided. Finally, a long term vision and commitment from national governments and international donors is required. Exploration of the cost, effectiveness, and sustainability of the different community-based ART models in different contexts will be needed.
    • Evaluation of a 5-year programme to prevent mother-to-child transmission of HIV infection in Northern Uganda

      Ahoua, Laurence; Ayikoru, Harriet; Gnauck, Katherine; Odaru, Grace; Odar, Emmanuel; Ondoa-Onama, Christine; Pinoges, Loretxu; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Epicentre, Paris, France; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Kampala, Uganda; Arua Regional District Hospital, Ministry of Health, Arua, Uganda; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Paris, France (2010-07-13)
      Prevention of mother-to-child transmission (PMTCT) is essential in HIV/AIDS control. We analysed 2000-05 data from mother-infant pairs in our PMTCT programme in rural Uganda, examining programme utilization and outcomes, HIV transmission rates and predictors of death or loss to follow-up (LFU). Out of 19,017 women, 1,037 (5.5%) attending antenatal care services tested HIV positive. Of these, 517 (50%) enrolled in the PMTCT programme and gave birth to 567 infants. Before tracing, 303 (53%) mother-infant pairs were LFU. Reasons for dropout were infant death and lack of understanding of importance of follow-up. Risk of death or LFU was higher among infants with no or incomplete intrapartum prophylaxis (OR = 1.90, 95% CI 1.07-3.36) and of weaning age <6 months (OR 2.55, 95% CI 1.42-4.58), and lower in infants with diagnosed acute illness (OR 0.30, 95% CI 0.16-0.55). Mother-to-child HIV cumulative transmission rate was 8.3%, and 15.5% when HIV-related deaths were considered. Improved tracking of HIV-exposed infants is needed in PMTCT programmes where access to early infant diagnosis is still limited.
    • Immunovirological response to combined antiretroviral therapy and drug resistance patterns in children: 1- and 2-year outcomes in rural Uganda.

      Ahoua, Laurence; Guenther, Gunar; Rouzioux, Christine; Pinoges, Loretxu; Anguzu, Paul; Taburet, Anne-Marie; Balkan, Suna; Olson, David M; Olaro, Charles; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar; Clinical Research Department, Epicentre, Paris, France; Laboratory of Virology, Necker Hospital, Paris, France; Department of Operations, Médecins Sans Frontières, Arua, Uganda; Laboratory of Clinical Pharmacology, Bicêtre Hospital, Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Medical Department, Médecins Sans Frontières, New York, USA; Medical and Administrative Hospital Direction, Arua Regional Referral Hospital, Arua, Uganda (BioMed Central, 2011-07-26)
      Children living with HIV continue to be in urgent need of combined antiretroviral therapy (ART). Strategies to scale up and improve pediatric HIV care in resource-poor regions, especially in sub-Saharan Africa, require further research from these settings. We describe treatment outcomes in children treated in rural Uganda after 1 and 2 years of ART start.
    • The kynurenine pathway of tryptophan catabolism, CD4+ T-cell recovery, and mortality among HIV-infected Ugandans initiating antiretroviral therapy.

      Byakwaga, Helen; Boum, Yap; Huang, Yong; Muzoora, Conrad; Kembabazi, Annet; Weiser, Sheri D; Bennett, John; Cao, Huyen; Haberer, Jessica E; Deeks, Steven G; Bangsberg, David R; McCune, Joseph M; Martin, Jeffrey N; Hunt, Peter W (Oxford University Press, 2014-08-01)
      Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection-induced indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-1 (IDO) expression in activated monocytes and dendritic cells catabolizes tryptophan to kynurenine and other downstream catabolites that inhibit T-cell proliferation and interleukin 17 (IL-17) production. The prognostic significance of this pathway in treated HIV disease is unknown.
    • Life expectancy of persons receiving combination antiretroviral therapy in low-income countries: a cohort analysis from Uganda

      Mills, Edward J; Bakanda, Celestin; Birungi, Josephine; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Cooper, Curtis L; Nachega, Jean B; Dybul, Mark; Hogg, Robert S; University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; The AIDS Support Organization, Kampala, Uganda; British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Geneva, Switzerland; Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Public Health, Baltimore, Maryland; Centre for Infectious Disease Epidemiology and Research, University of Cape Town and Stellenbosch University, Cape Town, South Africa; The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada; Simon Fraser University, Burnaby, British Columbia, Canada; O’Neill Institute for National and Global Health Law, Georgetown University, Washington, DC (American College of Physicians, 2011-07-18)
      Little is known about the effect of combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) on life expectancy in sub-Saharan Africa.
    • Mortality by baseline CD4 cell count among HIV patients initiating antiretroviral therapy: evidence from a large cohort in Uganda

      Mills, Edward J; Bakanda, Celestin; Birungi, Josephine; Mwesigwa, Robert; Chan, Keith; Ford, Nathan; Hogg, Robert S; Cooper, Curtis; Faculty of Health Sciences, University of Ottawa, Ottawa, Canada; The AIDS Support Organization (TASO), Headquarters, Kampala, Uganda; British Columbia Centre for Excellence in HIV/AIDS, Vancouver, Canada; Médecins Sans Frontiers (MSF), Geneva, Switzerland; Division of Infectious Diseases, The Ottawa Hospital, Ottawa, Canada (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2011-03-27)
      Evaluations of CD4 cell count and other prognostic factors on the survival of HIV patients in sub-Saharan Africa are extremely limited. Funders have been reticent to recommend earlier initiation of treatment. We aimed to examine the effect of baseline CD4 cell count on mortality using data from HIV patients receiving combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) in Uganda.
    • Paediatric HIV care in sub-Saharan Africa: clinical presentation and 2-year outcomes stratified by age group

      Ben-Farhat, Jihane; Gale, Marianne; Szumilin, Elisabeth; Balkan, Suna; Poulet, Elisabeth; Pujades-Rodríguez, Mar (John Wiley & Sons Ltd, 2013-09)
      To examine age differences in mortality and programme attrition amongst paediatric patients treated in four African HIV programmes.
    • Preventing HIV-1: lessons from Mwanza and Rakai.

      Matthys, F; Boelaert, M (Elsevier, 1999-05-01)
    • Risk factors for virological failure and subtherapeutic antiretroviral drug concentrations in HIV-positive adults treated in rural northwestern Uganda

      Ahoua, L; Guenther, G; Pinoges, L; Anguzu, P; Chaix, M L; Le Tiec, C; Balkan, S; Olson, D; Olaro, C; Pujades-Rodriguez, M; Epicentre, Paris, France; Médecins Sans Frontières, Arua, Uganda; Laboratory of Virology, Paris Descartes University, Paris, France; Laboratory of Toxicology, Bicêtre Hospital, Kremlin Bicêtre, France; Médecins Sans Frontières, Paris, France; Medical and Administrative Hospital Direction, Arua Regional Hospital, Arua, Uganda; International and Environmental Health, Institute of Social and Preventive Medicine, Bern, Switzerland (2009-06-03)
      ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Little is known about immunovirological treatment outcomes and adherence in HIV/AIDS patients on antiretroviral therapy (ART) treated using a simplified management approach in rural areas of developing countries, or about the main factors influencing those outcomes in clinical practice. METHODS: Cross-sectional immunovirological, pharmacological, and adherence outcomes were evaluated in all patients alive and on fixed-dose ART combinations for 24 months, and in a random sample of those treated for 12 months. Risk factors for virological failure (>1,000 copies/mL) and subtherapeutic antiretroviral (ARV) concentrations were investigated with multiple logistic regression. RESULTS: At 12 and 24 months of ART, 72% (n=701) and 70% (n=369) of patients, respectively, were alive and in care. About 8% and 38% of patients, respectively, were diagnosed with immunological failure; and 75% and 72% of patients, respectively, had undetectable HIV RNA (<400 copies/mL). Risk factors for virological failure (>1,000 copies/mL) were poor adherence, tuberculosis diagnosed after ART initiation, subtherapeutic NNRTI concentrations, general clinical symptoms, and lower weight than at baseline. About 14% of patients had low ARV plasma concentrations. Digestive symptoms and poor adherence to ART were risk factors for low ARV plasma concentrations. CONCLUSIONS: Efforts to improve both access to care and patient management to achieve better immunological and virological outcomes on ART are necessary to maximize the duration of first-line therapy.
    • Village-based AIDS prevention in a rural district in Uganda.

      Schopper, D; Doussantousse, S; Ayiga, N; Ezatirale, G; Idro, W J; Homsy, J; Médecins Sans Frontières, Geneva, Switzerland. (Oxford Journals, 1995-06)
      OBJECTIVE: To design, implement and evaluate a village-based AIDS prevention programme in a rural district in north-western Uganda. A baseline KAP survey of the general population was carried out to design a district-wide information campaign and condom promotion programme. Eighteen months later the impact achieved was measured through a second KAP survey, using the same methodology. METHODS: Anonymous structured interviews were conducted in March 1991 and October 1992 with 1486 and 1744 randomly selected individuals age 15-49, respectively. RESULTS: At 18 months, 60% of respondents had participated in an information session in the past year (47% women, 71% men) and 42% had received a pamphlet about AIDS (26% women, 58% men). Knowledge about AIDS, high initially (94%), reached 98%. More respondents knew that the incubation period is longer than one year (from 29% to 40%), and were willing to take care of a PWA (from 60% to 77%). Knowledge about condoms increased from 26 to 63% in women and 57 to 91% in men. Ever use of condoms among persons having engaged in casual sex in the past year increased from 6 to 33% in women, and 27 to 48% in men. Fifty per cent of condom users criticized lack of regular access to condoms. CONCLUSIONS: This is the first documented example of the impact a village-based AIDS prevention programme can achieve in a rural African community. Critical areas to be improved were identified, such as: women must be given better access to information, more attention must be paid to explain the asymptomatic state of HIV infection in appropriate terms, and condom social marketing must be developed.