• Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine and artemether-lumefantrine for treating uncomplicated malaria in African children: a randomised, non-inferiority trial

      Bassat, Quique; Mulenga, Modest; Tinto, Halidou; Piola, Patrice; Borrmann, Steffen; Menéndez, Clara; Nambozi, Michael; Valéa, Innocent; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Sasi, Philip; Bacchieri, Antonella; Corsi, Marco; Ubben, David; Talisuna, Ambrose; D'Alessandro, Umberto; Barcelona Centre for International Health Research (CRESIB), Hospital Clínic, Institut d'Investigacions Biomèdiques August Pi i Sunyer, Universitat de Barcelona, Barcelona, Spain; Manhiça Health Research Centre (CISM), Manhiça, Mozambique; Tropical Disease Research Centre, Ndola, Zambia; Centre Muraz, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso, IRSS/DRO, Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso; Epicentre/MSF, Mbarara, Uganda; Kenya Medical Research Institute, Kilifi, Kenya; University of Heidelberg, Heidelberg, Germany; Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Muhimbili University of Health and Allied Sciences, Dar es Salaam, Tanzania; Sigma Tau Industrie Farmaceutiche Riunite, Pomezia, Rome, Italy; Medicines for Malaria Venture, Geneva, Switzerland; Prince Leopold Institute of Tropical Medicine, Antwerp, Belgium (2009-11-17)
      BACKGROUND: Artemisinin combination therapies (ACTs) are currently the preferred option for treating uncomplicated malaria. Dihydroartemisinin-piperaquine (DHA-PQP) is a promising fixed-dose ACT with limited information on its safety and efficacy in African children. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: The non-inferiority of DHA-PQP versus artemether-lumefantrine (AL) in children 6-59 months old with uncomplicated P. falciparum malaria was tested in five African countries (Burkina Faso, Kenya, Mozambique, Uganda and Zambia). Patients were randomised (2:1) to receive either DHA-PQP or AL. Non-inferiority was assessed using a margin of -5% for the lower limit of the one-sided 97.5% confidence interval on the treatment difference (DHA-PQP vs. AL) of the day 28 polymerase chain reaction (PCR) corrected cure rate. Efficacy analysis was performed in several populations, and two of them are presented here: intention-to-treat (ITT) and enlarged per-protocol (ePP). 1553 children were randomised, 1039 receiving DHA-PQP and 514 AL. The PCR-corrected day 28 cure rate was 90.4% (ITT) and 94.7% (ePP) in the DHA-PQP group, and 90.0% (ITT) and 95.3% (ePP) in the AL group. The lower limits of the one-sided 97.5% CI of the difference between the two treatments were -2.80% and -2.96%, in the ITT and ePP populations, respectively. In the ITT population, the Kaplan-Meier estimate of the proportion of new infections up to Day 42 was 13.55% (95% CI: 11.35%-15.76%) for DHA-PQP vs 24.00% (95% CI: 20.11%-27.88%) for AL (p<0.0001). CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: DHA-PQP is as efficacious as AL in treating uncomplicated malaria in African children from different endemicity settings, and shows a comparable safety profile. The occurrence of new infections within the 42-day follow up was significantly lower in the DHA-PQP group, indicating a longer post-treatment prophylactic effect. TRIAL REGISTRATION: Controlled-trials.com ISRCTN16263443.
    • Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency, Chlorproguanil-Dapsone with Artesunate and Post-treatment Haemolysis in African children treated for uncomplicated Malaria

      Van Malderen, Carine; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Machevo, Sonia; González, Raquel; Bassat, Quique; Talisuna, Ambrose; Yeka, Adoke; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Piola, Patrice; Daniel, Atwine; Turyakira, Eleanor; Forret, Pascale; Van Overmeir, Chantal; van Loen, Harry; Robert, Annie; D' Alessandro, Umberto; Faculté de pharmacie et des sciences biomédicales, Université catholique de Louvain, Brussels, Belgium. carine.vanmalderen@uclouvain.be (2012-04-30)
      Malaria is a leading cause of mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan African children. Prompt and efficacious treatment is important as patients may progress within a few hours to severe and possibly fatal disease. Chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA) was a promising artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), but its development was prematurely stopped because of safety concerns secondary to its associated risk of haemolytic anaemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals. The objective of the study was to assess whether CDA treatment and G6PD deficiency are risk factors for a post-treatment haemoglobin drop in African children<5 years of age with uncomplicated malaria.