• Artemether-Lumefantrine to treat Malaria in pregnancy is associated with reduced placental Haemozoin deposition compared to Quinine in a randomized controlled trial

      Muehlenbachs, Atis; Nabasumba, Carolyn; McGready, Rose; Turyakira, Eleanor; Tumwebaze, Benon; Dhorda, Mehul; Nyehangane, Dan; Nalusaji, Aisha; Nosten, Franois; Guerin, Philippe J; et al. (2012-05-03)
      Data on efficacy of artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT) to treat Plasmodium falciparum during pregnancy in sub-Saharan Africa is scarce. A recent open label, randomized controlled trial in Mbarara, Uganda demonstrated that artemether-lumefantrine (AL) is not inferior to quinine to treat uncomplicated malaria in pregnancy. Haemozoin can persist in the placenta following clearance of parasites, however there is no data whether ACT can influence the amount of haemozoin or the dynamics of haemozoin clearance.
    • Efficacy and safety of artemether-lumefantrine compared with quinine in pregnant women with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria: an open-label, randomised, non-inferiority trial

      Piola, Patrice; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Turyakira, Eleanor; Dhorda, Mehul; Lindegardh, Niklas; Nyehangane, Dan; Snounou, Georges; Ashley, Elizabeth A; McGready, Rose; Nosten, Francois; et al. (2010-10-05)
      BACKGROUND: Malaria in pregnancy is associated with maternal and fetal morbidity and mortality. In 2006, WHO recommended use of artemisinin-based combination treatments during the second or third trimesters, but data on efficacy and safety in Africa were scarce. We aimed to assess whether artemether-lumefantrine was at least as efficacious as oral quinine for the treatment of uncomplicated falciparum malaria during the second and third trimesters of pregnancy in Mbarara, Uganda. METHODS: We did an open-label, randomised, non-inferiority trial between October, 2006, and May, 2009, at the antenatal clinics of the Mbarara University of Science and Technology Hospital in Uganda. Pregnant women were randomly assigned (1:1) by computer generated sequence to receive either quinine hydrochloride or artemether-lumefantrine, and were followed up weekly until delivery. Our primary endpoint was cure rate at day 42, confirmed by PCR. The non-inferiority margin was a difference in cure rate of 5%. Analysis of efficacy was for all randomised patients without study deviations that could have affected the efficacy outcome. This study was registered with ClinicalTrials.gov, number NCT00495508. FINDINGS: 304 women were randomly assigned, 152 to each treatment group. By day 42, 16 patients were lost to follow-up and 25 were excluded from the analysis. At day 42, 137 (99·3%) of 138 patients taking artemether-lumefantrine and 122 (97·6%) of 125 taking quinine were cured-difference 1·7% (lower limit of 95% CI -0·9). There were 290 adverse events in the quinine group and 141 in the artemether-lumefantrine group. INTERPRETATION: Artemisinin derivatives are not inferior to oral quinine for the treatment of uncomplicated malaria in pregnancy and might be preferable on the basis of safety and efficacy. FUNDING: Médecins Sans Frontières and the European Commission.
    • Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency, Chlorproguanil-Dapsone with Artesunate and Post-treatment Haemolysis in African children treated for uncomplicated Malaria

      Van Malderen, Carine; Van Geertruyden, Jean-Pierre; Machevo, Sonia; González, Raquel; Bassat, Quique; Talisuna, Ambrose; Yeka, Adoke; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Piola, Patrice; Daniel, Atwine; et al. (2012-04-30)
      Malaria is a leading cause of mortality, particularly in sub-Saharan African children. Prompt and efficacious treatment is important as patients may progress within a few hours to severe and possibly fatal disease. Chlorproguanil-dapsone-artesunate (CDA) was a promising artemisinin-based combination therapy (ACT), but its development was prematurely stopped because of safety concerns secondary to its associated risk of haemolytic anaemia in glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD)-deficient individuals. The objective of the study was to assess whether CDA treatment and G6PD deficiency are risk factors for a post-treatment haemoglobin drop in African children<5 years of age with uncomplicated malaria.
    • Heterogeneous decrease in malaria prevalence in children over a six-year period in south-western Uganda.

      De Beaudrap, Pierre; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Grandesso, Francesco; Turyakira, Eleanor; Schramm, Birgit; Boum, Yap; Etard, Jean-François; Epicentre Mbarara Research Base, Mbarara, Uganda. pierre.debeaudrap@epicentre.msf.org (2011-05-18)
      Malaria is a major public health problem, especially for children. However, recent reports suggest a decline in the malaria burden. The aim of this study was to assess the change in the prevalence of malaria infection among children below five years of age between 2004 and 2010 in a mesoendemic area of Uganda and to analyse the risk factors of malaria infection.
    • Impact of malaria during pregnancy on pregnancy outcomes in a Ugandan prospective cohort with intensive malaria screening and prompt treatment

      De Beaudrap, Pierre; Turyakira, Eleanor; White, Lisa J; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Tumwebaze, Benon; Muehlenbachs, Atis; Guérin, Philippe J; Boum, Yap; McGready, Rose; Piola, Patrice; et al. (BioMed Central, 2013-04-24)
      Malaria in pregnancy (MiP) is a major public health problem in endemic areas of sub-Saharan Africa and has important consequences on birth outcome. Because MiP is a complex phenomenon and malaria epidemiology is rapidly changing, additional evidence is still required to understand how best to control malaria. This study followed a prospective cohort of pregnant women who had access to intensive malaria screening and prompt treatment to identify factors associated with increased risk of MiP and to analyse how various characteristics of MiP affect delivery outcomes.
    • Performance of a Histidine-Rich Protein 2 Rapid Diagnostic Test, Paracheck Pf(R), for Detection of Malaria Infections in Ugandan Pregnant Women.

      Dhorda, Mehul; Piola, Patrice; Nyehangane, Dan; Tumwebaze, Benon; Nalusaji, Aisha; Nabasumba, Carolyn; Turyakira, Eleanor; McGready, Rose; Ashley, Elizabeth; Guerin, Philippe J; et al. (Am.J.trop.Med.Hyg., 2012-01-01)
      Abstract. Improved laboratory diagnosis is critical to reduce the burden of malaria in pregnancy. Peripheral blood smears appear less sensitive than Plasmodium falciparum histidine-rich protein 2-based rapid diagnostic tests (RDTs) for placental malaria infections in studies conducted at delivery. In this study, 81 women in Uganda in the second or third trimester of pregnancy were followed-up until delivery. At each visit, peripheral blood was tested by blood smear, RDT, and nested species-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Sensitivity and specificity of the tests was calculated with PCR, which detected 22 infections of P. falciparum, as the gold standard. The sensitivity and specificity of blood smears were 36.4% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 18.0-59.2%) and 99.6% (95% CI = 97.7-100%), respectively. The corresponding values for RDT were 31.8% (95% CI = 14.7-54.9%) and 100% (95% CI = 98.3-100%). The RDTs could replace blood smears for diagnosis of malaria in pregnancy by virtue of their relative ease of use. Field-based sensitive tests for malaria in pregnancy are urgently needed.