• Antimalarial efficacy of sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine, amodiaquine and a combination of chloroquine plus sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine in Bundi Bugyo, western Uganda.

      Checchi, F; Piola, P; Kosack, C; Ardizzoni, E; Klarkowski, D; Kwezi, E; Priotto, G; Balkan, S; Bakyaita, N; Brockman, A; et al. (Wiley-Blackwell, 2004-04)
      We report below an in vivo antimalarial efficacy study conducted in 2002 in Bundi Bugyo, a district of western Uganda housing a large displaced population. We tested sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), amodiaquine (AQ) and the combination chloroquine plus SP (CQ + SP). A total of 268 children with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were followed-up for 28 days according to WHO recommendations, with PCR genotyping to distinguish late recrudescences from re-infections. PCR-adjusted failure proportions at day 28 were 37.0% (34/92, 95% CI 27.1-47.7) in the SP group, 20.6% (14/68, 95% CI 11.7-32.1) in the AQ group and 22.8% (18/79, 95% CI 14.1-33.6) in the CQ + SP group. Early failures were particularly frequent in the SP group (15.2%). Clearance of gametocytes was slower in the SP and CQ + SP groups than in the AQ group. This study suggests that, in Bundi Bugyo, CQ + SP (Uganda's first-line regimen) will need to be replaced by a more efficacious regimen. Across Uganda, the deployment of SP containing combinations may not be a feasible long-term strategy. For Bundi Bugyo, we recommend a combination of artesunate and AQ. Our study also confirms previous findings that resistance is considerably underestimated by 14-day follow-ups. Antimalarial policy decisions should therefore be based on 28-day studies, with PCR adjustment to distinguish re-infections.
    • Artesunate and sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine combinations for the treatment of uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria in Uganda: a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial.

      Priotto, G; Kabakyenga, J K; Pinoges, L; Ruiz, A; Eriksson, T; Coussement, F; Ngambe, T; Taylor, W R J; Perea, W; Guthmann, J P; et al. (Elsevier, 2008-01-25)
      Drug-resistant malaria is spreading in Africa. The few available drugs might be safeguarded if combined with an artemisinin derivative. We investigated the efficacy, safety, and tolerability of 2 combinations of artesunate with sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP) in a mesoendemic region in Uganda with SP resistance, from September 1999 to June 2000. In a randomized, double-blind, placebo-controlled trial, 420 children aged 6-59 months with uncomplicated Plasmodium falciparum malaria were assigned SP alone (25 mg/kg sulfadoxine, 1.25 mg/kg pyrimethamine) or combined with artesunate (AS; 4 mg/kg/d) for either 1 d (SPAS1) or 3 d (SPAS3). Children were followed-up for 28 d. Day 14 cure rates were 84.6% (99/117) with SPAS3 and 61.9% (73/118) with SPAS1 compared with 55.8% (86/154) with SP. Corresponding day 28 results were 74.4% (87/117) and 45.2% (52/115) compared with 40.5% (62/153). A significant improvement was obtained with the addition of 3 d, but not 1 d, of artesunate (risk ratio [RR] = 1.5, 95% CI 1.3-1.8 at 14 d and RR = 1.8, 95% CI 1.5-2.3 at 28 d). Both AS regimens achieved significantly faster parasite clearance and lower gametocyte carriage. All drug regimens were well tolerated, but SP alone was ineffective. Treatment efficacy improved with SPAS3 but the cure rate at day 28 was modest. The combinations were well tolerated and safe. In areas where SP resistance is prevalent other combinations should be considered.
    • In vivo assessment of drug efficacy against Plasmodium falciparum malaria: duration of follow-up.

      Stepniewska, K; Taylor, W R J; Mayxay, M; Price, R; Smithuis, F; Guthmann, J P; Barnes, K; Myint, H Y; Adjuik, M; Olliaro, P; et al. (2004-11)
      To determine the optimum duration of follow-up for the assessment of drug efficacy against Plasmodium falciparum malaria, 96 trial arms from randomized controlled trials (RCTs) with follow-up of 28 days or longer that were conducted between 1990 and 2003 were analyzed. These trials enrolled 13,772 patients, and participating patients comprised 23% of all patients enrolled in RCTs over the past 40 years; 61 (64%) trial arms were conducted in areas where the rate of malaria transmission was low, and 58 (50%) trial arms were supported by parasite genotyping to distinguish true recrudescences from reinfections. The median overall failure rate reported was 10% (range, 0 to 47%). The widely used day 14 assessment had a sensitivity of between 0 and 37% in identifying treatment failures and had no predictive value. Assessment at day 28 had a sensitivity of 66% overall (28 to 100% in individual trials) but could be used to predict the true failure rate if either parasite genotyping was performed (r(2) = 0.94) or if the entomological inoculation rate was known. In the assessment of drug efficacy against falciparum malaria, 28 days should be the minimum period of follow-up.