• A randomized trial comparing the efficacy of four treatment regimens for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in Assam state, India.

      Campbell, P; Baruah, S; Narain, K; Rogers, C C; Medecins sans Frontieres-Holland, India Section, R.G. Baruah Road, Guwahati, Assam 781024, India. patricia10334@yahoo.com (Elsevier, 2006-02)
      A four-arm drug sensitivity study compared chloroquine, sulfadoxine-pyrimethamine (SP), mefloquine and mefloquine-artesunate in Sonitpur and Karbi Anglong districts in Assam state, India. Two criteria were used to ascertain outcome: success of clinical treatment and parasitologic cure. In Sonitpur, at 14 days, there were 36/56 early and late treatment failures plus late parasitologic failures to chloroquine and 16/56 for SP. In Karbi Anglong, combined treatment failure at 14 days was 16/56 to chloroquine and 8/60 to SP. Mefloquine and mefloquine-artesunate demonstrated 93.9% and 93.6% sustained responses respectively at 42 days. High failure rates to both chloroquine and SP preclude the use of these drugs as first-line treatment for uncomplicated falciparum malaria in this region. A mefloquine-artesunate combination presents an effective alternative utilizing the currently recommended higher dose of mefloquine.
    • Relapses of Plasmodium vivax infection usually result from activation of heterologous hypnozoites.

      Imwong, M; Snounou, G; Pukrittayakamee, S; Tanomsing, N; Kim, J R; Nandy, A; Guthmann, J P; Nosten, F; Carlton, J; Looareesuwan, S; Nair, S; Sudimack, D; Day, N P J; Anderson, T J C; White, N J; Department of Clinical Tropical Medicine, Faculty of Tropical Medicine, Mahidol University, Bangkok, Thailand. (Infectious Diseases Society of America and University of Chicago Press, 2007-04-01)
      BACKGROUND: Relapses originating from hypnozoites are characteristic of Plasmodium vivax infections. Thus, reappearance of parasitemia after treatment can result from relapse, recrudescence, or reinfection. It has been assumed that parasites causing relapse would be a subset of the parasites that caused the primary infection. METHODS: Paired samples were collected before initiation of antimalarial treatment and at recurrence of parasitemia from 149 patients with vivax malaria in Thailand (n=36), where reinfection could be excluded, and during field studies in Myanmar (n=75) and India (n=38). RESULTS: Combined genetic data from 2 genotyping approaches showed that novel P. vivax populations were present in the majority of patients with recurrent infection (107 [72%] of 149 patients overall [78% of patients in Thailand, 75% of patients in Myanmar {Burma}, and 63% of patients in India]). In 61% of the Thai and Burmese patients and in 55% of the Indian patients, the recurrent infections contained none of the parasite genotypes that caused the acute infection. CONCLUSIONS: The P. vivax populations emerging from hypnozoites commonly differ from the populations that caused the acute episode. Activation of heterologous hypnozoite populations is the most common cause of first relapse in patients with vivax malaria.