• Environmental risk factors for clinical malaria: a case-control study in the Grau region of Peru.

      Guthmann, J P; Hall, A J; Jaffar, S; Palacios, A; Lines, J; Llanos-Cuentas, A; Department of Infectious and Tropical Disease, Infectious Disease Epidemiology Unit, London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine, UK. jguthmann@epicentre.msf.org (2001)
      The role of environmental risk factors in clinical malaria has been studied mainly in Africa and Asia, few investigations have been carried out in Latin America. Field observations in northern coastal Peru, where the prevalence of malaria is high during the agricultural season, suggested that the risk of disease varied according to the characteristics of the house and the house environment. Environmental determinants of the risk of clinical malaria were therefore investigated through a case-control study: 323 clinical cases of malaria, recruited through community-based active case-finding, and 969 age-, sex- and village-matched controls were recruited into the study over a period of 12 months ending June 1997. Residual spraying of houses in the previous 6 months, living more than 100 m from a canal, a level of education equal to primary school or above and working in agriculture conferred significant protection from the risk of developing clinical malaria. The presence of spaces between the wall and roof in the subject's bedroom (eaves) and a house aged > 4 years statistically significantly increased the risk of disease. Based on these results we discuss possible control measures for malaria in this area of the country.