• A case report of a child with probable drug resistant tuberculous pericarditis with a review of challenges involved in diagnosis, treatment and follow up of children with DR-TB pericarditis

      Swaminathan, Aravind; du Cros, Philipp; Achar, Jay; Kliescikova, Jarmila; Mirgayosieva, Shamsiya; Pirmahmadzoda, Bobojon; Médecins Sans Frontières, Dushanbe, Tajikistan; Paediatric Intensive Care Unit, Great Ormond Street Hospital, London, UK; Médecins Sans Frontières, Manson Unit, London, UK; Médecins Sans Frontières, Dushanbe, Tajikistan; National Tuberculoofsis Programme, Ministry of Health and Social Protection of the Republic Tajikistan, Dushanbe, Tajikistan. (2020-04-22)
      Background: There are unique challenges in the diagnosis and management of multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in children. It is difficult to obtain confirmatory microbiological diagnosis in TB pericarditis. It is essential to differentiate between drug sensitive and drug resistant forms of TB as it has a major bearing on the regimen used, and inappropriate TB treatment combined with steroid use for pericarditis can lead to deterioration. With lack of samples, the treatment decision relies on the drug resistance pattern of the close contact if available. Therapeutic challenges of MDR-TB management in a child involve use of toxic drugs that need to be judiciously handled. We report a 2 years 4 months old male child who was diagnosed with TB pericarditis and treated based on the resistance pattern of his mother who was on treatment for pulmonary MDR-TB. Case presentation: This 2 years 4 months old male child was diagnosed with TB involving his pericardium. Getting him started on an appropriate regimen was delayed due to the difficulty in establishing microbiological confirmation and drug susceptibility. He was commenced on a regimen based on his mother’s drug resistance pattern and required surgery due to cardiac failure during the course of his treatment. He successfully completed 2 years of therapy. Conclusions: This child’s case demonstrates that despite unique challenges in diagnosis and management of drug resistant extra pulmonary tuberculosis in children, treatment of even complex forms can be successful. The need for high suspicion of MDR-TB, especially when there is close contact with pulmonary TB, careful design of an effective regimen that is tolerated by the child, indications for invasive surgical management of pericarditis, appropriate follow-up and management of adverse effects are emphasised.
    • A case report of a child with probable drug resistant tuberculous pericarditis with a review of challenges involved in diagnosis, treatment and follow up of children with DR-TB pericarditis

      Swaminathan, A; du Cros, P; Achar, J; Kliescikova, J; Mirgayosieva, S; Pirmahmadzoda, B (BMC, 2020-04-22)
      Background: There are unique challenges in the diagnosis and management of multi drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) in children. It is difficult to obtain confirmatory microbiological diagnosis in TB pericarditis. It is essential to differentiate between drug sensitive and drug resistant forms of TB as it has a major bearing on the regimen used, and inappropriate TB treatment combined with steroid use for pericarditis can lead to deterioration. With lack of samples, the treatment decision relies on the drug resistance pattern of the close contact if available. Therapeutic challenges of MDR-TB management in a child involve use of toxic drugs that need to be judiciously handled. We report a 2 years 4 months old male child who was diagnosed with TB pericarditis and treated based on the resistance pattern of his mother who was on treatment for pulmonary MDR-TB. Case presentation: This 2 years 4 months old male child was diagnosed with TB involving his pericardium. Getting him started on an appropriate regimen was delayed due to the difficulty in establishing microbiological confirmation and drug susceptibility. He was commenced on a regimen based on his mother's drug resistance pattern and required surgery due to cardiac failure during the course of his treatment. He successfully completed 2 years of therapy. Conclusions: This child's case demonstrates that despite unique challenges in diagnosis and management of drug resistant extra pulmonary tuberculosis in children, treatment of even complex forms can be successful. The need for high suspicion of MDR-TB, especially when there is close contact with pulmonary TB, careful design of an effective regimen that is tolerated by the child, indications for invasive surgical management of pericarditis, appropriate follow-up and management of adverse effects are emphasised.
    • Convergence of a Diabetes Mellitus, Protein Energy Malnutrition, and TB Epidemic: the Neglected Elderly Population

      Menon, S; Rossi, R; Nshimyumukiza, L; Wusiman, A; Zdraveska, N; Eldin, MS (BioMed Central, 2016-07-26)
      On a global scale, nearly two billion persons are infected with Mycobacterium tuberculosis. From this vast reservoir of latent tuberculosis (TB) infection, a substantial number will develop active TB during their lifetime, with some being able to transmit TB or Multi-drug- resistant (MDR) TB to others. There is clinical evidence pointing to a higher prevalence of infectious diseases including TB among individuals with Diabetes Mellitus (DM). Furthermore, ageing and diabetes mellitus may further aggravate protein-energy malnutrition (PEM), which in turn impairs T-lymphocyte mediated immunologic defenses, thereby increasing the risk of developing active TB and compromising TB treatment. This article aims to a) highlight synergistic mechanisms associated with immunosenescence, DM and PEM in relation to the development of active TB and b) identify nutritional, clinical and epidemiological research gaps.
    • Direct microscopy versus sputum cytology analysis and bleach sedimentation for diagnosis of tuberculosis: a prospective diagnostic study.

      Hepple, P; Nguele, P; Greig, J; Bonnet, M; Sizaire, V (2010-09-21)
      ABSTRACT: BACKGROUND: Diagnostic options for pulmonary tuberculosis in resource-poor settings are commonly limited to smear microscopy. We investigated whether bleach concentration by sedimentation and sputum cytology analysis (SCA) increased the positivity rate of smear microscopy for smear-positive tuberculosis. METHODS: We did a prospective diagnostic study in a Medecins Sans Frontieres-supported hospital in Mindouli, Republic of Congo. Three sputum samples were obtained from 280 consecutive pulmonary tuberculosis suspects, and were processed according to WHO guidelines for direct smear microscopy. The remainder of each sputum sample was homogenised with 2.6% bleach, sedimented overnight, smeared, and examined blinded to the direct smear result for acid-fast bacilli (AFB). All direct smears were assessed for quality by SCA. If a patient produced fewer than three good-quality sputum samples, further samples were requested. Sediment smear examination was performed independently of SCA result on the corresponding direct smear. Positivity rates were compared using McNemar's test. RESULTS: Excluding SCA, 43.2% of all patients were diagnosed as positive on direct microscopy of up to three samples. 47.9% were diagnosed on sediment microscopy, with 48.2% being diagnosed on direct microscopy, sediment microscopy, or both. The positivity rate increased from 43.2% to 47.9% with a case definition of one positive smear ([greater than or equal to]1 AFB/100 high power fields) of three, and from 42.1% to 43.9% with two positive smears. SCA resulted in 87.9% of patients producing at least two good-quality sputum samples, with 75.7% producing three or more. Using a case definition of one positive smear, the incremental yield of bleach sedimentation was 14/121, or 11.6% (95% CI 6.5-18.6, p=0.001) and in combination with SCA was 15/121, or 12.4% (95% CI 7.1-19.6, p=0.002). Incremental yields with two positive smears were 5/118, or 4.2% (95% CI 1.4-9.6, p=0.062) and 7/118, or 5.9% (95% CI 2.4-11.8, p=0.016), respectively. CONCLUSIONS: The combination of bleach sedimentation and SCA resulted in significantly increased microscopy positivity rates with a case definition of either one or two positive smears. Implementation of bleach sedimentation led to a significant increase in the diagnosis of smear-positive patients. Implementation of SCA did not result in significantly increased diagnosis of tuberculosis, but did result in improved sample quality. Requesting extra sputum samples based on SCA results, combined with bleach sedimentation, could significantly increase the detection of smear-positive patients if routinely implemented in resource-limited settings where gold standard techniques are not available. We recommend that a pilot phase is undertaken before routine implementation to determine the impact in a particular context.
    • Male Gender is independently associated with pulmonary tuberculosis among sputum and non-sputum producers people with presumptive tuberculosis in Southwestern Uganda

      Boum, Y; Atwine, D; Orikiriza, P; Assimwe, J; Page, A-L; Mwanga-Amumpaire, J; Bonnet, M (BioMed Central, 2014-12-10)
      BackgroundLittle is known about the association between gender and risk of TB infection. We sought to assess the impact of gender on TB prevalence among people with presumptive tuberculosis at a regional referral hospital in a high TB and HIV prevalence setting.MethodsWe analyzed data from two diagnostic TB studies conducted in rural, southwestern Uganda. People with presumptive tuberculosis were evaluated by chest X-ray, fluorescence microscopy, TB culture, and HIV testing. Our primary outcome of interest was TB infection, as defined by a positive TB culture. Our primary explanatory variable of interest was gender. We fit univariable and multivariable logistic regression models to investigate associations between TB infection and gender, before and after adjusting or possible confounding factors, including ability to produce sputum, age and residence.ResultsBetween April 2010 and September 2012, 863 people with presumptive tuberculosis (PWPTB) were enrolled in the two studies at Mbarara Regional Referral Hospital (MRRH) in Uganda. Among them 664 (76.9%) were able to produce sputum. X-ray was suggestive of TB for 258 (66.5%) of males and 175 (44.8%) of female (p¿<¿0.001). using microscopy 84 (20%) of males and 48 (10.9%) of females were diagnosed with TB (p¿<¿0.001) while 122 (30.3%) of males and 76 (18.4%) of females were diagnosed with TB (p¿<¿0.001) using TB culture.In multivariable logistic regression models, the odds of having TB was higher in males than females (AOR 2.2 (1.56-3.18 95%CI°, P¿<¿0.001), after adjustment for age, HIV status, ability to produce sputum, and residence.ConclusionIn Southwestern Uganda, TB prevalence is higher among male than female people with presumptive TB. The increased risk of TB among males is independent of other TB risk factors. These findings emphasize the need for gender-focused interventions aimed at reducing TB transmission.
    • Predictors of Delayed Culture Conversion Among Ugandan Patients

      Atwine, D; Orikiriza, P; Taremwa, I; Ayebare, A; Logoose, S; Mwanga-Amumpaire, J; Jindani, A; Bonnet, M (BioMed Central, 2017-04-24)
      Estimates of month-2 culture conversion, a proxy indicator of tuberculosis (TB) treatment efficacy in phase-2 trials can vary by culture-type and geographically with lower rates reported among African sites. The sub-study aimed at comparing TB detection rates of different culture media, within and across rifampicin-based regimens (R10, 15 and 20 mg/Kg) over a 6-month treatment follow-up period, and to establish predictors of month-2 culture non-conversion among HIV-negative TB patients enrolled at RIFATOX trial site in Uganda.
    • Where There is Hope: A Qualitative Study Examining Patients' Adherence to Multi-Drug Resistant Tuberculosis Treatment in Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan

      Horter, S; Stringer, B; Greig, J; Amangeldiev, A; Tillashaikhov, MN; Parpieva, N; Tigay, Z; du Cros, P (BioMed Central, 2016-07-28)
      Treatment for multi-drug resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) is lengthy, has severe side effects, and raises adherence challenges. In the Médecins Sans Frontières (MSF) and Ministry of Health (MoH) programme in Karakalpakstan, Uzbekistan, a region with a high burden of MDR-TB, patient loss from treatment (LFT) remains high despite adherence support strategies. While certain factors associated with LFT have been identified, there is limited understanding of why some patients are able to adhere to treatment while others are not. We conducted a qualitative study to explore patients' experiences with MDR-TB treatment, with the aim of providing insight into the barriers and enablers to treatment-taking to inform future strategies of adherence support.