• High prevalence of multidrug-resistant tuberculosis, Swaziland, 2009-2010

      Sanchez-Padilla, E; Dlamini, T; Ascorra, A; Rüsch-Gerdes, S; Tefera, Z D; Calain, P; de la Tour, R; Jochims, F; Richter, E; Bonnet, M; et al. (Center for Disease Control, 2012-01)
      In Africa, although emergence of multidrug-resistant (MDR) tuberculosis (TB) represents a serious threat in countries severely affected by the HIV epidemic, most countries lack drug-resistant TB data. This finding was particularly true in the Kingdom of Swaziland, which has the world's highest HIV and TB prevalences. Therefore, we conducted a national survey in 2009-2010 to measure prevalence of drug-resistant TB. Of 988 patients screened, 420 new case-patients and 420 previously treated case-patients met the study criteria. Among culture-positive patients, 15.3% new case-patients and 49.5% previously treated case-patients harbored drug-resistant strains. MDR TB prevalence was 7.7% and 33.8% among new case-patients and previously treated case-patients, respectively. HIV infection and past TB treatment were independently associated with MDR TB. The findings assert the need for wide-scale intervention in resource-limited contexts such as Swaziland, where diagnostic and treatment facilities and health personnel are lacking.
    • Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis in Central Asia.

      Cox, H; Orozco, J D; Male, R; Ruesch-Gerdes, S; Falzon, D; Small, I; Doshetov, D; Kebede, Y; Aziz, M; Médecins Sans Frontières Aral Sea Area Programme, Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. hom@msfh-tashkent.uz (2004-05)
      Multidrug-resistant tuberculosis (MDR-TB) has emerged as a major threat to TB control, particularly in the former Soviet Union. To determine levels of drug resistance within a directly observed treatment strategy (DOTS) program supported by Médecins Sans Frontières in two regions in Uzbekistan and Turkmenistan, Central Asia, we conducted a cross-sectional survey of smear-positive TB patients in selected districts of Karakalpakstan (Uzbekistan) and Dashoguz (Turkmenistan). High levels of MDR-TB were found in both regions. In Karakalpakstan, 14 (13%) of 106 new patients were infected with MDR-TB; 43 (40%) of 107 previously treated patients were similarly infected. The proportions for Dashoguz were 4% (4/105 patients) and 18% (18/98 patients), respectively. Overall, 27% of patients with positive smear results whose infections were treated through the DOTS program in Karakalpakstan and 11% of similar patients in Dashoguz were infected with multidrug-resistant strains of TB on admission. These results show the need for concerted action by the international community to contain transmission and reduce the effects of MDR-TB.
    • Off-Label Use of Bedaquiline in Children and Adolescents with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

      Achar, J; Hewison, C; Cavalheiro, AP; Skrahina, A; Cajazeiro, J; Nargiza, P; Herboczek, K; Rajabov, A; Hughes, J; Ferlazzo, G; et al. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2017-10)
      We describe 27 children and adolescents <18 years of age who received bedaquiline during treatment for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis. We report good treatment responses and no cessation attributable to adverse effects. Bedaquiline could be considered for use with this age group for multidrug-resistant tuberculosis when treatment options are limited.
    • Outcomes of Bedaquiline Treatment in Patients with Multidrug-Resistant Tuberculosis

      Mbuagbaw, L; Guglielmetti, L; Hewison, C; Bakare, N; Bastard, M; Caumes, E; Frechet-Jachym, M; Robert, J; Veziris, N; Khachatryan, N; et al. (Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, 2019-05-01)
      Bedaquiline is recommended by the World Health Organization for the treatment of multidrug-resistant (MDR) and extensively drug-resistant (XDR) tuberculosis (TB). We pooled data from 5 cohorts of patients treated with bedaquiline in France, Georgia, Armenia, and South Africa and in a multicountry study. The rate of culture conversion to negative at 6 months (by the end of 6 months of treatment) was 78% (95% CI 73.5%-81.9%), and the treatment success rate was 65.8% (95% CI 59.9%-71.3%). Death rate was 11.7% (95% CI 7.0%-19.1%). Up to 91.1% (95% CI 82.2%-95.8%) of the patients experienced >1 adverse event, and 11.2% (95% CI 5.0%-23.2%) experienced a serious adverse event. Lung cavitations were consistently associated with unfavorable outcomes. The use of bedaquiline in MDR and XDR TB treatment regimens appears to be effective and safe across different settings, although the certainty of evidence was assessed as very low.