• Defining priority medical devices for cancer management: a WHO initiative

      Velazquez Berumen, A; Jimenez Moyao, G; Rodriguez, NM; Ilbawi, AM; Migliore, A; Shulman, LN (The Lancet, 2018-12)
    • Leave no one behind: response to new evidence and guidelines for the management of cryptococcal meningitis in low-income and middle-income countries

      Loyse, A; Burry, J; Cohn, J; Ford, N; Chiller, T; Ribeiro, I; Koulla-Shiro, S; Mghamba, J; Ramadhani, A; Nyirenda, R; et al. (The Lancet, 2018-10-18)
      In 2018, WHO issued guidelines for the diagnosis, prevention, and management of HIV-related cryptococcal disease. Two strategies are recommended to reduce the high mortality associated with HIV-related cryptococcal meningitis in low-income and middle-income countries (LMICs): optimised combination therapies for confirmed meningitis cases and cryptococcal antigen screening programmes for ambulatory people living with HIV who access care. WHO's preferred therapy for the treatment of HIV-related cryptococcal meningitis in LMICs is 1 week of amphotericin B plus flucytosine, and the alternative therapy is 2 weeks of fluconazole plus flucytosine. In the ACTA trial, 1-week (short course) amphotericin B plus flucytosine resulted in a 10-week mortality of 24% (95% CI -16 to 32) and 2 weeks of fluconazole and flucytosine resulted in a 10-week mortality of 35% (95% CI -29 to 41). However, with widely used fluconazole monotherapy, mortality because of HIV-related cryptococcal meningitis is approximately 70% in many African LMIC settings. Therefore, the potential to transform the management of HIV-related cryptococcal meningitis in resource-limited settings is substantial. Sustainable access to essential medicines, including flucytosine and amphotericin B, in LMICs is paramount and the focus of this Personal View.
    • Protection Against Cholera From Killed Whole-Cell Oral Cholera Vaccines: A Systematic Review and Meta-Analysis

      Bi, Q; Ferreras, E; Pezzoli, L; Legros, D; Ivers, L; Date, K; Qadri, F; Digilio, L; Sack, D; Ali, M; et al. (The Lancet, 2017-07-17)
      Killed whole-cell oral cholera vaccines (kOCVs) are becoming a standard cholera control and prevention tool. However, vaccine efficacy and direct effectiveness estimates have varied, with differences in study design, location, follow-up duration, and vaccine composition posing challenges for public health decision making. We did a systematic review and meta-analysis to generate average estimates of kOCV efficacy and direct effectiveness from the available literature.