• Handle Survivors with Care

      Sprecher, A (Massachusetts Medical Society, 2017-10-12)
    • Having and Fighting Ebola - Public Health Lessons from a Clinician Turned Patient

      Spencer, Craig (Massachusetts Medical Society, 2015-03-19)
    • Hepatitis B virus in the Lao People's Democratic Republic: A Cross Sectional Serosurvey in Different Cohorts.

      Black, Antony P; Nouanthong, Phonethipsavanh; Nanthavong, Naphavan; Souvannaso, Chanthasone; Vilivong, Keooudomphone; Jutavijittum, Prapan; Samountry, Bounthome; Lütteke, Nina; Hübschen, Judith M; Goossens, Sylvie; et al. (BioMed Central (Springer Science), 2014-08-23)
      Despite hepatitis B vaccination at birth and at 6, 10 and 14 weeks of age, hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection continues to be endemic in the Lao People's Democratic Republic (PDR). We carried out a cross-sectional serological study in infants, pre-school children, school pupils and pregnant women to determine their burden of disease, risk of infection and vaccination status.
    • Hepatitis C Virus Diagnosis and the Holy Grail

      Applegate, TL; Fajardo, E; Sacks, JA (Elsevier, 2018-06)
      The world has embraced the call for global elimination of hepatitis C virus by 2030. The unprecedented speed of therapeutic development and increased access to direct-acting antivirals has made elimination a possibility. We must screen hundreds of millions of people to diagnose and treat those currently infected. Global access to hepatitis C virus diagnostics will be a keystone to success. Key challenges must be overcome and systems optimized to ensure widespread access to existing diagnostics. Although promising technologies may soon transform the landscape, innovative strategies are needed to stimulate investment and accelerate the development of point-of-care hepatitis C virus diagnostics.
    • Hepatitis E should be considered a neglected tropical disease.

      Asman, AS; Ciglenecki, I; Wamala, JF; Lynch, J; Aggarwal, R; Rahman, M; Wong, S; Serafini, M; Moussa, AM; Dalton, HR; et al. (Public Library of Science, 2019-07-25)
    • Hepatitis E, Central African Republic.

      Escribà, J M; Nakoune, E; Recio, C; Massamba, P M; Matsika-Claquin, M D; Goumba, C; Rose, A M C; Nicand, E; García, E; Leklegban, C; et al. (2008-04)
    • Hepatitis E: Urgent Action Needed

      Ciglenecki, I (Elsevier, 2017-03)
    • High Hepatitis E Seroprevalence Among Displaced Persons in South Sudan

      Azman, A; Bouhenia, M; Iyer, A; Rumunu, J; Laku, R; Wamala, J; Rodriguez-Barraquer, I; Lessler, J; Gignoux, E; Luquero, F; et al. (American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2017-06)
      AbstractLarge protracted outbreaks of hepatitis E virus (HEV) have been documented in displaced populations in Africa over the past decade though data are limited outside these exceptional settings. Serological studies can provide insights useful for improving surveillance and disease control. We conducted an age-stratified serological survey using samples previously collected for another research study from 206 residents of an internally displaced person camp in Juba, South Sudan. We tested serum for anti-HEV antibodies (IgM and IgG) and estimated the prevalence of recent and historical exposure to the virus. Using data on individuals' serostatus, camp arrival date, and state of origin, we used catalytic transmission models to estimate the relative risk of HEV infection in the camp compared with that in the participants' home states. The age-adjusted seroprevalence of anti-HEV IgG was 71% (95% confidence interval = 63-78), and 4% had evidence of recent exposure (IgM). We estimated HEV exposure rates to be more than 2-fold (hazard ratio = 2.3, 95% credible interval = 0.3-5.8) higher in the camp than in the participants' home states, although this difference was not statistically significant. HEV transmission may be higher than previously appreciated, even in the absence of reported cases. Improved surveillance in similar settings is needed to understand the burden of disease and minimize epidemic impact through early detection and response.
    • High incidence of subcutaneous emphysema in children in a Somali refugee cAMP during measles outbreak.

      Moons, Peter; Thallinger, Monica (Lippincott Williams & Wilkins, 2014-01)
      During an outbreak of measles in a refugee camp in Ethiopia, 9 patients (age range 4 months to 18 years) were diagnosed with subcutaneous emphysema. Incidence of this rare complication of measles in this refugee camp was higher than previously reported. We hypothesize that the high incidence is most likely related to poor physical state of the refugee population with high rates of malnutrition.
    • High mortality associated with an outbreak of hepatitis E among displaced persons in Darfur, Sudan

      Boccia, Delia; Guthmann, Jean-Paul; Klovstad, Hilde; Hamid, Nuha; Tatay, Mercedes; Ciglenecki, Iza; Nizou, Jacques-Yves; Nicand, Elisabeth; Guerin, Philippe Jean; European Programme for Intervention Epidemiology Training, Stockholm, Sweden; Health Protection Agency–Centre for Infection, London, United Kingdom; Epicentre, Paris, France; Medecins Sans Frontieres, Paris, France; National Reference Centre of Enterically Transmitted Hepatitis (Hepatitis E Virus), Teaching Military Hospital Val de Grace, Paris, France; Norwegian Institute of Public Health, Oslo, Norway; Norwegian Field Epidemiology Training Programme, Oslo, Norway; World Health Organization, Khartoum, Sudan (2006-05-12)
      BACKGROUND: Hepatitis E virus (HEV) causes acute onset of jaundice and a high case-fatality ratio in pregnant women. We provide a clinical description of hospitalized case patients and assess the specific impact on pregnant women during a large epidemic of HEV infection in a displaced population in Mornay camp (78,800 inhabitants), western Darfur, Sudan. METHODS: We reviewed hospital records. A sample of 20 clinical cases underwent laboratory confirmation. These patients were tested for immunoglobulin G (IgG) and immunoglobulin M (IgM) antibody to HEV (serum) and for amplification of the HEV genome (serum and stool). We performed a cross-sectional survey in the community to determine the attack rate and case-fatality ratio in pregnant women. RESULTS: Over 6 months, 253 HEV cases were recorded at the hospital, of which 61 (24.1%) were in pregnant women. A total of 72 cases (39.1% of those for whom clinical records were available) had a diagnosis of hepatic encephalopathy. Of the 45 who died (case-fatality ratio, 17.8%), 19 were pregnant women (specific case-fatality ratio, 31.1%). Acute hepatitis E was confirmed in 95% (19/20) of cases sampled; 18 case-patients were positive for IgG (optical density ratio > or =3), for IgM (optical density ratio >2 ), or for both, whereas 1 was negative for IgG and IgM but positive for HEV RNA in serum. The survey identified 220 jaundiced women among the 1133 pregnant women recorded over 3 months (attack rate, 19.4%). A total of 18 deaths were recorded among these jaundiced pregnant women (specific case-fatality ratio, 8.2%). CONCLUSIONS: This large epidemic of HEV infection illustrates the dramatic impact of this disease on pregnant women. Timely interventions and a vaccine are urgently needed to prevent mortality in this special group.
    • High mortality in displaced populations of northern Uganda.

      Nathan, N; Tatay, M; Piola, P; Lake, S; Brown, V (Elsevier, 2004-04-24)
    • High Prevalence of Shigella or Enteroinvasive Escherichia coli Carriage among Residents of an Internally Displaced Persons Camp in South Sudan

      Bliss, J; Bouhenia, M; Hale, P; Couturier, BA; Iyer, AS; Rumunu, J; Martin, S; Wamala, JF; Abubakar, A; Sack, DA; et al. (American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene, 2017-12-04)
      Displaced persons living in camps are at an increased risk of diarrheal diseases. Subclinical carriage of pathogens may contribute to the spread of disease, especially for microbes that require a low infectious dose. Multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect a panel of 20 bacterial, viral, and protozoal targets, and we report a high prevalence of enteropathogen carriage, including Shigella spp. or enteroinvasive Escherichia coli in 14%, among a sample of 88 asymptomatic individuals in an internally displaced persons camp in South Sudan. Further studies are needed to determine the contribution of such carriage to the spread of disease.
    • High sensitivity and specificity of the Pastorex latex agglutination test for Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A during a clinical trial in Niger.

      Borel, T; Rose, A M C; Guillerm, M; Sidikou, F; Gerstl, S; Djibo, A; Nathan, N; Chanteau, S; Guerin, P J; Epicentre, 8 rue St Sabin, 75011 Paris, France. (2006-10)
      There is a great need for a rapid diagnostic test to guide vaccine choice during outbreaks of meningococcal meningitis in resource-poor countries. During a randomised clinical trial conducted during an epidemic of Neisseria meningitidis serogroup A in Niger in 2003, the sensitivity and specificity of the Pastorex latex agglutination test for this serogroup under optimal field conditions were assessed, using culture and/or PCR as the gold standard. Results from 484 samples showed a sensitivity of 88% (95% CI 85-91%) and a specificity of 93% (95% CI 90-95%). Pastorex could be a good alternative to current methods, as it can be performed in a local laboratory with rapid results and is highly specific. Sensitivity can be improved with prior microscopy where feasible. A study specifically to evaluate the Pastorex test under epidemic conditions, using laboratories with limited resources, is recommended.
    • High Seroconversion Rates in Trypanosoma Cruzi Chronic Infection Treated with Benznidazole in People Under 16 Years in Guatemala

      Brum-Soares, L; Cubides, JC; Burgos, I; Monroy, C; Castillo, L; González, S; Viñas, PA; Urrutia, PP (Scielo Brasil, 2016-12-01)
      Geographical, epidemiological, and environmental differences associated with therapeutic response to Chagas etiological treatment have been previously discussed. This study describes high seroconversion rates 72 months after benznidazole treatment in patients under 16 years from a project implemented by Doctors without Borders in Guatemala.
    • High sustained viral response rate in patients with hepatitis C using generic sofosbuvir and daclatasvir in Phnom Penh, Cambodia

      Zhang, M; O'Keefe, D; Iwamoto, M; Sann, K; Kien, A; Hang, V; Brucker, C; Jolivet, P; Ly, S; Chhit, D; et al. (Wiley, 2020-05-02)
      Safe and efficacious pan-genotypic direct-acting antiviral (DAA) regimens, such as sofosbuvir and daclatasvir (SOF+DCV)facilitate simplified models of care for hepatitis C virus (HCV). However, in Cambodia access to HCV testing and treatment has typically been low. In response, Médecins Sans Frontières(MSF) implemented a HCV testing and treatment pilot project in Phnom Penh, Cambodia in 2016. This project provides the first real-world evidence of SOF+DCV effectiveness across a large patient cohort using a simplified care model in Cambodia.Patients treated with SOF+DCV from September 2016 to June 2019 were included in the analysis. Medical standard operational procedures (SOPs) were simplified significantly across the study period. Treatment effectiveness was assessed by sustained viral response at 12 weeks post-treatment (SVR12) according to a modified intention to treat methodology. Treatment safety was assessed by clinical outcome and occurrence of serious and non-serious adverse events (S/AE). Of 9158 patients, median age was 57 years and 39.6% were male. At baseline assessment, 27.2% of patients had compensated cirrhosis and 2.9% had decompensated cirrhosis. Genotype 6 was predominant (53.0%). Among patients analysed according to modified intention to treat (n=8525), treatment effectiveness was high, with 97.2% of patients achieving SVR12. Occurrence of SAE was low (0.7%). Treatment effectiveness and safety was not affected by the iterative simplification to treatment modality. In conclusion, in this large treatment cohort in Phnom Penh, Cambodia, the SOF+DCV regimen showed high rates of treatment effectiveness and safety across patient sub-groups and during progressive simplification.
    • Highly Drug-Resistant Pathogens Implicated In Burn-Associated Bacteremia in an Iraqi Burn Care Unit

      Ronat, Jean-Baptiste; Kakol, Jabar; Khoury, Marwan N; Berthelot, Mathilde; Yun, Oliver; Brown, Vincent; Murphy, Richard A (Public Library of Science, 2014-08-11)
      In low- and middle-income countries, bloodstream infections are an important cause of mortality in patients with burns. Increasingly implicated in burn-associated infections are highly drug-resistant pathogens with limited treatment options. We describe the epidemiology of bloodstream infections in patients with burns in a humanitarian surgery project in Iraq.
    • Hippopotamus bite morbidity: a report of 11 cases from Burundi.

      Haddara, MM; Haberisoni, JB; Trelles, M; Gohou, JP; Christella, K; Dominguez, L; Ali, E (Oxford University Press, 2020-08-10)
      Hippopotamus is one of the most-loved animals in Africa, yet it is aggressive and dangerous. The co-existence of humans in close proximity to their natural habitat increases the probability of human injury. Hippopotamus attacks have long been recognized to cause serious injuries, but its magnitude and burden are still unknown. The medical literature is very scarce when it comes to documenting hippopotamus bite injuries and their outcomes. We present a cohort of 11 patients who suffered hippopotamus bite injuries in Burundi. To our knowledge, this is the largest case series reporting on the clinical presentation, injury patterns and surgical outcomes of hippopotamus bites. The results show a high incidence of wound infections, amputations and permanent disability among other complications. Hippopotamus-inflicted injuries should, therefore, be triaged as major trauma rather than just 'mammalian bites'.
    • Hypertension and treatment outcomes in Palestine refugees in United Nations Relief and Works Agency primary health care clinics in Jordan.

      Khader, A; Farajallah, L; Shahin, Y; Hababeh, M; Abu-Zayed, I; Zachariah, R; Kochi, A; Kapur, A; Harries, A D; Shaikh, I; et al. (Wiley, 2014-07-12)
      In six United Nations Relief and Works Agency (UNRWA) primary health care clinics in Jordan serving Palestine refugees diagnosed with hypertension, to determine the number, characteristics, programme outcomes and measures of disease control for those registered up to 30 June, 2013, and in those who attended clinic in the second quarter of 2013, the prevalence of disease-related complications between those with hypertension only and hypertension combined with diabetes mellitus.
    • 'I treat it but I don't know what this disease is': a qualitative study on noma (cancrum oris) and traditional healing in northwest Nigeria.

      Farley, E; Bala, HM; Lenglet, A; Mehta, U; Abubakar, N; Samuel, J; de Jong, A; Bil, K; Oluyide, B; Fotso, A; et al. (Oxford University Press, 2019-08-24)
      BACKGROUND: Noma, a neglected disease mostly affecting children, with a 90% mortality rate if untreated, is an orofacial gangrene that disintegrates the tissues of the face in <1 wk. Noma can become inactive with early stage antibiotic treatment. Traditional healers, known as mai maganin gargajiya in Hausa, play an important role in the health system and provide care to noma patients. METHODS: We conducted 12 in-depth interviews with caretakers who were looking after noma patients admitted at the Noma Children's Hospital and 15 traditional healers in their home villages in Sokoto state, northwest Nigeria. We explored perceptions of noma, relationship dynamics, healthcare practices and intervention opportunities. Interviews were audiorecorded, transcribed and translated. Manual coding and thematic analysis were utilised. RESULTS: Traditional healers offered specialised forms of care for specific conditions and referral guidance. They viewed the stages of noma as different conditions with individualised remedies and were willing to refer noma patients. Caretakers trusted traditional healers. CONCLUSIONS: Traditional healers could play a crucial role in the early detection of noma and the health-seeking decision-making process of patients. Intervention programmes should include traditional healers through training and referral partnerships. This collaboration could save lives and reduce the severity of noma complications.
    • [Icterus, anemia and acute abdomen].

      Sträuli, C; Richter, H J; Blanc, C (Springer Link, 2014-09)