• Acting on an Environmental Health Disaster: The Case of the Aral Sea.

      Small, I; van der Meer, J; Upshur, R; Uzbekistan/Turkmenistan and the Aral Sea Area Program, Medecins Sans Frontieres, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. msfh-tashkent@amsterdam.msf.org (Published by National Institute of Environmental Health Sciences, 2001-06)
      The Aral Sea area in Central Asia has been encountering one of the world's greatest environmental disasters for more than 15 years. During that time, despite many assessments and millions of dollars spent by large, multinational organizations, little has changed. The 5 million people living in this neglected and virtually unknown part of the world are suffering not only from an environmental catastrophe that has no easy solutions but also from a litany of health problems. The region is often dismissed as a chronic problem where nothing positive can be achieved. Within this complicated context, Medecins Sans Frontieres, winner of the Nobel Peace Prize in 1999, is actively trying to assess the impact of the environmental disaster on human health to help the people who live in the Aral Sea area cope with their environment. Medecins Sans Frontieres has combined a direct medical program to improve the health of the population while conducting operational research to gain a better understanding of the relationship between the environmental disaster and human health outcomes. In this paper we explore the health situation of the region and the broader policy context in which it is situated, and present some ideas that could potentially be applied to many other places in the world that are caught up in environmental and human health disasters.
    • DOTS in Aral Sea area.

      Shafer, J; Falzon, D; Small, I; Kittle, D; Ford, N (2001-12-08)
    • Not a drop to drink in the Aral Sea.

      Small, I; Falzon, D; van der Meer, J; Ford, N; Upshur, R (2001-11-10)
    • Safe Water for the Aral Sea Area: Could it get Any Worse?

      Small, I; Falzon, D; van der Meer, J; Ford, N; Médecins Sans Frontières, Aral Sea Programme, Tashkent, Uzbekistan. (Published by Oxford University Press, 2003-03)
      The environmental adversities around the Aral Sea in Central Asia have been the subject of recent research. Attempts at sustainable provision of palatable drinking water in low chemical and microbial contaminants for the 4 million people in the two countries around the Aral littoral have been largely unsuccessful. In the last few years, severe drought has further depleted the amount of available water. This shortage has negatively impacted on agriculture, and accentuated the out migration of people. An appeal is made to assist the local population in this arid area to cope with the acute and chronic deterioration of water security.
    • What is the relationship of medical humanitarian organisations with mining and other extractive industries?

      Calain, P; Unité de Recherche sur les Enjeux et Pratiques Humanitaires, Médecins Sans Frontières, Genève, Switzerland. philippe.calain@geneva.msf.org (Public Library of Science, 2012-08-28)
      Philippe Calain discusses the health and environmental hazards of extractive industries like mining and explores the tensions that arise when medical humanitarian organizations are called to intervene in emergencies involving the extractive sector.